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DNE kicks off Australian citrus season

DNE World Fruit LLC kicked off its 2013 Australian summer citrus program with the recent arrival of the first vessel into the port of Long Beach in California.

The season will run from late June through October starting with Daisies and Navels. Daisies will peak on size 70s followed by 54s. Peak promotion period for Daisies will run early July through early August.

Australian Navels will begin arriving early July but due to intermittent rains heavier volume won’t arrive until later in July.

“The quality has been excellent in the packing sheds in Australia,” said Stu Monaghan, Australian citrus program manager for DNE. “We’re seeing high color and great flavor right from the start from each of the growing regions. Peak sizing will be 56s followed by 48s then 72s. We’ll see that shift to higher volumes of 72s and fewer 48s in our August arrivals.”

DNE recommends promoting Aussie Navels from late July through the first week of October. Minneolas will be ready to promote the second week of July through September. Tangelo peak sizes will be 53 followed by 63 and packed in 10-kilo cartons. Three-pound bags are available throughout the program.

As the back-to-school timeframe approaches, Cara Cara Navels and blood oranges will be included in DNE’s Australian citrus lineup.

DNE, a leading importer of Australian citrus, plans to bring in more than 500,000 cartons of Navels for the season along with specialty varieties of Daisies, Minneolas, Cara Caras and blood oranges.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Whole Foods kicks off school food fundraisers

Whole Foods Market said Monday that its Whole Kids Foundation would seek to raise $ 3 million toward funding salad bars and gardens for schools, and nutrition education for teachers.

The effort is part of the foundation’s annual campaign aimed at raising awareness around the importance of childhood nutrition and helping schools provide healthier food choices for students.

The fundraiser will run throughout September at Whole Foods Market stores, which will will host a variety of educational and interactive fundraising events, the retailer said. Shoppers can get involved by making a donation at store checkouts or online at wholekidsfoundation.org.


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“Well-nourished kids miss fewer days of school and are better able to pay attention in class, improving academic performance, and as Whole Kids Foundation celebrates its third anniversary, we’re excited to see visible results from our work,” said Nona Evans, executive director of Whole Kids Foundation. “School salad bars are getting kids excited about school lunches and eating fresh fruits and vegetables, and school gardens are not only connecting kids to the roots of their food and how nutrition helps their bodies, they are increasing their curiosity around trying new foods.”



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US: Northwest pear season kicks off early, less production expected

Like many summer crops in Pacific Coast states, the pear season in the Pacific Northwest began earlier than usual. The alternating nature of the crop also means that this year’s production will likely be less than what was harvested during last year’s big season.

Pears from the Pacific Northwest are usually harvested from July through October, though picking began a little earlier than normal. But that head start wasn’t huge, noted Cristie Mather, director of communications for Pear Burea Northwest, and the timing is in line with typical harvest timing. Production, however, is expected to be less than what was achieved last season.

“The dip in production is due to the natural cyclical nature of pear tree production,” explained Mather. “Crop yields alternate between larger crops and smaller crops each year. Last year was a larger crop year, so this year we can expect to see a smaller crop year. Next year we will be back into a larger crop yield.” Estimates put this year’s fresh pear production at 18.7 million 44-pound equivalent boxes, or 411,400 tons. That’s 13 percent smaller than last year’s crop and six percent smaller than the five-year production average for the region.

Demand this season is expected to build on the upward trend established over the past few years in both the domestic market and the export market.

“The 2013-2014 season will be the second consecutive season that total Northwest pear exports have surpassed the $ 200 million mark,” noted Jeff Correa, international marketing director for Pear Bureau Northwest. “The 2013-14 season will near the record established last season, but will most likely end up being the second highest export value season for the industry.” With nearly 42 percent of exports going to Mexico, Correa predicted that about 4.0 million boxes will reach that market this season. Canada will likely come in second with 2.1 million boxes, and Russia, the United Arab Emirates, Colombia, Brazil, India and China round out the list of export destinations. The latter market is of particular note, considering it was only fairly recently that Northwest growers were able to ship pears there.

“Northwest pear shippers sent a few containers initially after the opening of the market in January 2013, and the 2013-14 season was the first full season for Northwest pear shipments to the market, with 184,840 boxes shipped to China – substantially higher than our initial expectations,” said Correa. “While we expected China to emerge as one of the industry’s top Red Pear markets, it also emerged as a better than expected market for the Green Anjou variety as well. China ended this past season as the industry’s sixth largest Green Anjou export market, the second-largest Red Anjou export market and top export market for Starkrimson pears.”

For more information:

Cristie Mather

Pear Bureau Northwest

+1 503 652 9720

FreshPlaza.com

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA fruit grower disaster aid program kicks off

WASHINGTON — Beginning July 22, eligible fruit growers who experienced losses in 2012 due to frost and freeze, and who did not have access to crop insurance, will be able to apply for disaster relief from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The latest farm bill included a provision — penned by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) — that allows farmers without access to crop insurance and living in primary and adjacent counties that received a Secretarial disaster designation because of frost or freeze in 2012 to be eligible for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program assistance. The program focuses on fruit crops grown on a tree or bush that suffered low yields due to damaging weather, though it also extends to natural occurrences such as earthquakes and floods.

“Family farms and businesses shouldn’t have to go under because of a few days of bad weather,” Stabenow said. “That’s why it was so crucial when writing the 2014 farm bill to make sure that growers of all crops have access to relief to keep their farms running.”

Stabenow said cherry and apple crops in Michigan and across the country were destroyed in frosts and freezes in 2012, leaving growers without crop insurance few options.

USDA said launching the farm bill program was a priority.

“After the 2014 farm bill was enacted into law, USDA expedited the restart of disaster assistance programs as a top priority,” Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan Garcia said in a statement.

NAP enrollment begins July 22, and all applications must be submitted to a FSA county office by Sept. 22. FSA has a 17-page list of counties in the nation that were designated in 2012 for freeze or frost disaster.

Producers are encouraged to gather records documenting these losses to expedite the process, and to contact their FSA county office to schedule an appointment.

“Limited resource, socially disadvantaged and beginning producers are eligible for premium reductions and also may be eligible for fee reductions,” FSA said.

Interested producers are encouraged to check FSA’s website for more information on the program.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New Mexico kicks off an early onion season

Onion production is ramping up for New Mexico’s 17 shippers. “Many of those are also growers, while other growers broker their onions,” said Katie Goetz, public information officer for the New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

Onion movement began early this year. “The shipping season started in mid-May this year and will run through late August for the most part, although some sheds will ship through mid-September,” she said.

Goetz said production is primarily concentrated in Doña Ana, Luna, and Sierra counties.onCropOverviewNew Mexico onion production is concentrated in Doña Ana, Luna, and Sierra counties. Good weather translated to an early start to the 2014 shipping season with initial supplies moving in mid-May. The season is expected to continue through mid-September. (Photo courtesy of Andrea Rojas/New Mexico State University)

“New Mexico onion growers produce mostly yellows, but there are some whites and some reds,” she said. “The major varieties of commercially grown New Mexico onions include Grano, Granex, Sweet Spanish and mid-summer hybrids such as the popular Nu-Mex variety.”

The majority of these onions are conventional.  

Weather conditions have been conducive to onion production. “We had mild temperatures in the fall and winter, and it’s been a warm spring — all good for yield and quality,” Goetz stated.

New Mexico onion producers primarily service the retail sector. “A few shippers also sell them through the foodservice and/or processing channels,” Goetz noted. Onions are sold throughout the United States and exported to Canada and Mexico.

Onions are among New Mexico’s top ten cash producing crops.

On June 13, the National Potato and Onion Report provided data about the 2014 New Mexico onion crop. Demand was described as moderate, and the market was reported as steady. Pricing for yellow Grano 50-pound sacks of super colossals was $ 11-12; colossals were $ 9-10; jumbos were $ 8-9; and mediums were $ 6-8.  Repack sizes were $ 5.50-7.

Fifty-pound sacks of jumbo white onions sold for $ 12-13, and mediums sold for $ 10-12. Twenty-five pound sacks of Red Globe jumbos sold for $ 7-8, and mediums sold for $ 5-7.

This past March, NASS issued its report, Vegetables 2013 Summary. According to the report, growers planted a total of 6,200 acres to summer non-storage onions in 2013, up 13 percent from 2012.

Growers harvested 6,100 acres in 2013, also up 13 percent from the previous crop year. The production level for 2013 was set at approximately 2.6 million hundredweight, down 8 percent from 2012. Yield per acre in 2013 was 430 hundredweight. The value of production in 2013 was $ 40.9 million.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New Mexico kicks off an early onion season

Onion production is ramping up for New Mexico’s 17 shippers. “Many of those are also growers, while other growers broker their onions,” said Katie Goetz, public information officer for the New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

Onion movement began early this year. “The shipping season started in mid-May this year and will run through late August for the most part, although some sheds will ship through mid-September,” she said.

Goetz said production is primarily concentrated in Doña Ana, Luna, and Sierra counties.onCropOverviewNew Mexico onion production is concentrated in Doña Ana, Luna, and Sierra counties. Good weather translated to an early start to the 2014 shipping season with initial supplies moving in mid-May. The season is expected to continue through mid-September. (Photo courtesy of Andrea Rojas/New Mexico State University)

“New Mexico onion growers produce mostly yellows, but there are some whites and some reds,” she said. “The major varieties of commercially grown New Mexico onions include Grano, Granex, Sweet Spanish and mid-summer hybrids such as the popular Nu-Mex variety.”

The majority of these onions are conventional.  

Weather conditions have been conducive to onion production. “We had mild temperatures in the fall and winter, and it’s been a warm spring — all good for yield and quality,” Goetz stated.

New Mexico onion producers primarily service the retail sector. “A few shippers also sell them through the foodservice and/or processing channels,” Goetz noted. Onions are sold throughout the United States and exported to Canada and Mexico.

Onions are among New Mexico’s top ten cash producing crops.

On June 13, the National Potato and Onion Report provided data about the 2014 New Mexico onion crop. Demand was described as moderate, and the market was reported as steady. Pricing for yellow Grano 50-pound sacks of super colossals was $ 11-12; colossals were $ 9-10; jumbos were $ 8-9; and mediums were $ 6-8.  Repack sizes were $ 5.50-7.

Fifty-pound sacks of jumbo white onions sold for $ 12-13, and mediums sold for $ 10-12. Twenty-five pound sacks of Red Globe jumbos sold for $ 7-8, and mediums sold for $ 5-7.

This past March, NASS issued its report, Vegetables 2013 Summary. According to the report, growers planted a total of 6,200 acres to summer non-storage onions in 2013, up 13 percent from 2012.

Growers harvested 6,100 acres in 2013, also up 13 percent from the previous crop year. The production level for 2013 was set at approximately 2.6 million hundredweight, down 8 percent from 2012. Yield per acre in 2013 was 430 hundredweight. The value of production in 2013 was $ 40.9 million.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Frieda’s kicks off ‘Eat One Fruit a Day That Scares You’ campaign

EatOneFruit FearNoFruitfudaFrieda’s Specialty Produce takes another step to further its mission to change the way America eats fruits and vegetables with its new campaign, “Eat One Fruit a Day That Scares You.”

Frieda’s new consumer campaign aims to challenge consumers to put specialty fruits like Dragon Fruit, Kiwanos or Mangosteens in their grocery shopping carts and on plates in their favorite restaurants, and to share their stories about fearing no fruit on social media.

Consumers can join in the conversation, get tips from other consumers and share their own adventures by using #FearNoFruit on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

“We want to encourage people to explore the produce department for something new and exciting, and take a chance with an item on the menu you haven’t tasted before,” Karen Caplan, president and chief executive officer of Frieda’s, said in a press release. “After all, what better way to eat more fruits and vegetables than to keep trying new things? The next new fruit you try might just end up being your new favorite.”

Frieda’s encourages interested retailers, wholesalers and foodservice distributors to join in the mission to change the way America eats fruits and vegetables by providing consumers with unique produce.

Contact Frieda’s for key merchandising recommendations, promotional ideas, a product list, and marketing tools all designed to support the “Eat One Fruit a Day That Scares You” campaign.

Also available from Frieda’s are extensive product information, high-resolution images and a recipe database to assist with marketing needs.

More information is available at http://www.friedas.com/fearnofruit.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Curry & Co. kicks off Vidalia sweet carrot deal

Despite the highly publicized winter weather extremes that occurred in Georgia this year, Curry & Co. is off to a good start with its Vidalia sweet carrot season. Growing conditions have been good for carrots and the 2014 season is expected to run from late February into June.

Vidalia-Sweet-Carrots-tableOver 450 acres of Vidalia sweet carrots will be harvested exclusively in Georgia, and Curry & Co.’s packing warehouse is located in Statesboro, GA.

“We are excited about the great flavor of our sweet carrots, and so are our customers,” Adam Blocker, carrot sales manager for Curry & Co., said in a press release. “Demand is up over 2013 as retailers like having something new and unique in their full-sized carrot category. We discovered this niche in 2011 and it continues to create excitement.”

The emphasis in 2014 will be on cello carrots, and Curry & Company offers one-, two-, three- and five-pound carrot bags for consumers. There are also 25- and 50-pound bulk packages. In 2013, two-pound bags were the leading sales item for Curry & Co.

Curry & Co., headquartered in Brooks, OR, is a year-round supplier of sweet onions, onions and blueberries, and it has a seasonal blackberry program.

The company will feature its Vidalia sweet carrots at the Southeast Produce Council’s upcoming Southern Exposure conference in Orlando, FL.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Staay-Hispa kicks off Costa Rican melon season.

Fred Rennen: “Expecting same volumes as last year”
Staay-Hispa kicks off Costa Rican melon season.

Tholen – Last week, Staay-Hispa kicked off the Costa Rican melon season with Cantaloupe melons, from grower Exporpack, under the brand Delicia. The first watermelons came from Dulce and this week the yellow melons will arrive.

“Everything will be postponed for a little while, certainly when it comes to yellow and water melons. There aren’t many products on the market right now,” said Fred Rennen, who recently visited the Costa Rican production areas.

“The grower-conditions in Costa Rica were fine until now, the productions look very good. The first Cantaloupe melons are good quality, sweet and have a high brix. I am very positive about the follow-up for the season. I see now, that prices are stabilizing and rising,” said Fred.

Staay-Hispa expects to receive the same volumes of melons from Costa Rica as last year. “We are focussed on Costa Rica and offer a wide packet of several varieties, such as Charentais, Cantaloupe, Galia, yellow and watermelons, with or without pips,” said Fred.

“The season takes until the middle of May. Because of the continuity and the volume of reliable partners, we are capable to close off large programs with our clients, inland and abroad.”

SFG- DULCE, share of Staay Food Group, produces melons, watermelons, mango’s and pineapple under the brand DULCE in Costa Rica. Export of these products focusses on Europe and the USA.

For more information
Staay Hispa B.V.
Handelscentrum ZHZ
2991 LD Barendrecht
T  +31 (0)180 679 117
F  +31 (0)180 679 101
[email protected]
www.staay-hispa.nl

Publication date: 2/10/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Safmarine kicks off the New Year with yet another award

Safmarine kicks off the New Year with yet another award

Shipping line Safmarine has celebrated the start of 2014 with yet another award, this time a 2013 bronze Hellmann Worldwide Logistics Carrier of the Year award. The award – presented to Safmarine at an event held in Hamburg, Germany – marked the fifth consecutive year in which Safmarine has received awards from Hellmann.


From left to right: Marcus Leaver (Hellmann Director Global Seafreight), Jost Hellmann (Managing Owner, Hellmann), Michael Amri (Hellmann Vice President Seafreight Europe), Steve Knight (Safmarine Global Head of Sales) and Sammy Reynaert (Safmarine Director Key Accounts)

According to Safmarine CEO, Grant Daly, “The consistent recognition of Safmarine as one of Hellmann’s top three carriers is proof that the Safmarine team’s hard work, customer care, passion and commitment is being recognized by Hellmann and we greatly appreciate their acknowledgement thereof.”

Michael Amri, Hellmann’s Vice President Seafreight Europe, expressed similar sentiments and also lauded Safmarine for its excellent Key Client Programme and relationships at country level. “Together we go places and look forward to doing so in 2014, thanks to Safmarine’s continued support,” he concluded.

For more information please visit www.safmarine.com

Publication date: 1/10/2014

FreshPlaza.com

Stemilt kicks off 50th year with anniversary box

Stemilt Growers is kicking off its 50th year with the introduction of a retro anniversary carton for apples.

A white box adorned with the Stemilt logo and ladybug was originally designed by Stemilt’s late founder Tom Mathison and used for many years to distinguish the brand at retail and other worldwide markets.White-Anniversary-Box

The anniversary carton follows the original design but keeps the “World Famous Fruit” tagline with the company logo and shows off a special 50th anniversary emblem that highlights this important company milestone.

The “World Famous Fruit” tagline was the vision of Tom Mathison’s son and fourth-generation apple, pear and cherry grower Kyle Mathison, who felt the company’s journey was to grow and pack fruit with world famous qualities each day.

According to Stemilt marketing director Roger Pepperl, the apple anniversary carton will start showing up at retail in mid-January. In addition to the white box, there is a blue and a red version for other grades.

The company plans to use the 50th anniversary emblem with its traditional white box for cherries this summer and will have a retro pear label to match the 50th year look beginning in August.

“The anniversary carton series is just one way we will be celebrating this milestone in 2014,” Pepperl said in a press release. “The 50 year emblem, designed in-house, will appear throughout our marketing efforts, including cartons, collateral and website.”

The journey to the golden anniversary year started back in 1964 when third-generation apple, pear and cherry grower Tom Mathison began a tree fruit packing and shipping operation on Stemilt Hill in Wenatchee, WA. The Mathison family had been farming on Stemilt Hill since homesteading 160 acres there in 1893.

Mathison chose Stemilt Growers as the name of the company in order to honor the land that his family had been farming for so long and to share with the world the great locale that his fruits originated.

Always the innovator, Mathison spent most of his life working to advance Stemilt and the tree fruit industry as a whole. He was a driving force behind bringing Washington apples, pears and cherries to the global marketplace, and an early adopter in both organic farming and sustainable agriculture.

In 2005, Mathison’s grandson, West Mathison, succeeded his grandfather as Stemilt president. He has carried on the traditions that his grandfather began while elevating Stemilt’s leadership position in apples, pears, cherries, stone fruits, and organics. He has been instrumental in bringing new varieties and packing technologies to Stemilt in order to continue fulfilling the company’s mission — maximize return to the land by building consumer demand.

“The 50th year anniversary is a huge milestone for our family and the entire Stemilt team,” West Mathison added in the press release. “2014 will be an exciting year as we honor our past accomplishments, while continuing to build toward the future.”

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