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Using genetic screening to improve Korean white wheat

Visiting scientist Dae Wook Kim hopes to develop a line of Korean wheat that does not sprout when exposed to wet harvest conditions, thanks to genetic screening techniques he learned at South Dakota State University.

He is working with molecular biologist Jai Rohila of the biology and microbiology department through a two-year project sponsored by the National Institute of Crop Science in Suwaon, South Korea. It is part of his country’s effort to increase wheat production.

Korean farmers raise white winter wheat, planting in October and harvesting in June; however, the country’s rainy season begins in June, explained Kim. If the rains hit before the crop has been harvested, the grain begins to sprout in the head.

Korean white winter wheat is particularly susceptible to preharvest sprouting, according to Kim. Preharvest sprouting reduces the quality of the grain and the yield, added Rohila.

Last summer, SDSU spring wheat breeder Karl Glover provided Kim with 40 lines of South Dakota wheat — half tolerant and half susceptible to preharvest sprouting. Kim compared these lines to determine which genes and proteins account for tolerance.

When Kim returned in July for his second three-month stay, he brought seeds from two Korean lines — Sukang, which has more sprouting tolerance, and Baegjoong, which is susceptible.

Looking at both lines, he identified 33 proteins that are differentially expressed in the tolerant cultivar. Kim will quantify the gene expression levels from Glover’s newest lines that are resistant to preharvest sprouting and compare those results with the list of differentially expressed proteins from the Korean cultivars.

If the same proteins are differentially expressed in Glover’s varieties, Kim will validate the genes he identified as important to tolerance in his Korean varieties.

“If it is related to tolerance, the same gene should be in other tolerant varieties.” Kim added. “At that level, we know the gene is expressed in the same way.”

His work at SDSU will decrease the time it takes to improve preharvest sprouting tolerance in Korean white wheat.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by South Dakota State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

South Korean farmers protest China FTA in Seoul

South Korean farmers protest China FTA in Seoul

Thousands of South Korean farmers rallied in Seoul on Thursday, protesting Chinese demands for more access to the local agricultural market as part of a planned free trade agreement (FTA) with South Korea.

About 5,000 farmers who grow chilli peppers, onions, and garlic gathered in Seoul’s financial district of Yeouido, protesting China’s reported move to ask for greater access for its agricultural products at the next round of negotiations for a bilateral FTA.

The 12th round of FTA talks between the two countries will be held in Daegu, 300 kilometres south of Seoul, next week, according to the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy.

“It is reported that China will demand the removal of tariffs on chilli peppers, garlic, and onions while reducing the number of agricultural products in the proposed market opening at the 12th round of the FTA talks,” the farmers said.

The farmers, who travelled by bus and plane to take part in Thursday’s rally, demanded that vegetables used for seasoning be excluded from the negotiations and that a special law be enacted to prevent illegal distribution of imported vegetables.

South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed at their summit in Seoul last week to make efforts for an early conclusion of their FTA talks, setting a goal of this year.

The South Korea-China FTA negotiations began in May 2012.

The countries agreed late last year to liberalize their markets for about 90 percent of all products traded between them but have since hit a stumbling block, partly over which products will be excluded from the proposed market opening.

Source: www.koreaherald.com

Publication date: 7/11/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Korean fruit exports more than doubled in last 10 years as result of FTA

Korean fruit exports more than doubled in last 10 years as result of FTA

Both the volume and diversity of Korea’s imported fruits have grown in the past decade since the country first began signing free trade agreements in 2003, the Korea Customs Service said Tuesday.

A trend analysis revealed that Korea’s fruit imports have increased 3.3 times in terms of value and 1.5 times in quantity. Korea imported $ 286 million worth of fruits in 2003 and $ 929 million last year, an average annual growth of 12.5 percent.

The United States has remained Korea’s largest fruit source since 2012 when it provided 37.9 percent of Korea’s imports, while the Association of Southeast Asian Nations was close behind with 35.5 percent, followed by Chile with 17.6 percent and Peru with 1.6 percent.

Imports from FTA nations accounted for over 90 percent of Korea’s total imported fruits, according to the KCS. Most of the imports were tropical fruits that can’t be grown locally such as oranges, bananas, kiwis and pineapples.

In 2003, the biggest fruit imports were oranges at 39.4 percent and bananas in second place at 31.8 percent, but the trend has turned, with bananas coming out on top at 27.3 percent last year, followed by oranges at 21 percent. Grape imports also grew a considerable amount from 7.5 percent in 2003 to 20.3 percent in 2013.

Moreover, with the rise in imports of lemons, mangos, grapefruit and other fruit, the selection is proving to have diversified.

Meanwhile, Korea’s fruit exports in 2013 amounted to $ 120 million, which is 2.2 times more than 10 years ago ― primarily due to larger exports of strawberries and persimmons, the KCS said.

Source: theinsidekorea.com

Publication date: 5/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Slightly lower South Korean citrus production

Though citrus production for the 2013-2014 season in South Korea is expected to be lower than last season’s production, a combination of factors will contribute to a higher quality crop.

Citrus production for the 2013-2014 season could reach 645,000 tons, according to a report by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. That’s 3.3 percent less than last year’s total, which was 667,000 tons. That dip is due to the cyclical nature of citrus seasons in Korea, where large crops crops are typically followed by lighter crops. Because last year’s crop was large, it’s normal that the 2013-2014 season’s crop is smaller.

But despite less fruit, the fruit will likely be of better quality this year due to no damage incurred during typhoon season. Sugar content is also expected to be higher than in previous years thanks to a 50-day drought during September and October. Combined with less imported fruit, citrus prices are likely to be higher than last year’s prices.

FreshPlaza.com

Slightly lower South Korean citrus production

Though citrus production for the 2013-2014 season in South Korea is expected to be lower than last season’s production, a combination of factors will contribute to a higher quality crop.

Citrus production for the 2013-2014 season could reach 645,000 tons, according to a report by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. That’s 3.3 percent less than last year’s total, which was 667,000 tons. That dip is due to the cyclical nature of citrus seasons in Korea, where large crops crops are typically followed by lighter crops. Because last year’s crop was large, it’s normal that the 2013-2014 season’s crop is smaller.

But despite less fruit, the fruit will likely be of better quality this year due to no damage incurred during typhoon season. Sugar content is also expected to be higher than in previous years thanks to a 50-day drought during September and October. Combined with less imported fruit, citrus prices are likely to be higher than last year’s prices.

FreshPlaza.com

Slightly lower South Korean citrus production

Though citrus production for the 2013-2014 season in South Korea is expected to be lower than last season’s production, a combination of factors will contribute to a higher quality crop.

Citrus production for the 2013-2014 season could reach 645,000 tons, according to a report by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. That’s 3.3 percent less than last year’s total, which was 667,000 tons. That dip is due to the cyclical nature of citrus seasons in Korea, where large crops crops are typically followed by lighter crops. Because last year’s crop was large, it’s normal that the 2013-2014 season’s crop is smaller.

But despite less fruit, the fruit will likely be of better quality this year due to no damage incurred during typhoon season. Sugar content is also expected to be higher than in previous years thanks to a 50-day drought during September and October. Combined with less imported fruit, citrus prices are likely to be higher than last year’s prices.

FreshPlaza.com

Slightly lower South Korean citrus production

Though citrus production for the 2013-2014 season in South Korea is expected to be lower than last season’s production, a combination of factors will contribute to a higher quality crop.

Citrus production for the 2013-2014 season could reach 645,000 tons, according to a report by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. That’s 3.3 percent less than last year’s total, which was 667,000 tons. That dip is due to the cyclical nature of citrus seasons in Korea, where large crops crops are typically followed by lighter crops. Because last year’s crop was large, it’s normal that the 2013-2014 season’s crop is smaller.

But despite less fruit, the fruit will likely be of better quality this year due to no damage incurred during typhoon season. Sugar content is also expected to be higher than in previous years thanks to a 50-day drought during September and October. Combined with less imported fruit, citrus prices are likely to be higher than last year’s prices.

FreshPlaza.com

Philippines: Korean paprika okay for import

Philippines: Korean paprika okay for import

Philippines will now allow fresh paprika imports from South Korea, an Agriculture official said yesterday.

“This is the first time that we will allow paprika imports to enter the country. We have not allowed paprika imports in the past,” Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) Director Clarito M. Barron said in a text message.

The Department of Agriculture (DA) yesterday issued Administrative Circular No. 1, Series of 2013, the rules and regulations governing the importation of fresh paprika from Jeju Island, Korea.

The circular stated that all exporters and processing facilities that intend to ship to the Philippines shall be registered with the Korean Animal, Plant, and Fisheries Quarantine and Inspection Agency (QIA), as only those included in the list shall be allowed to export to the country.

The issuance also stated that paprika to be exported to the Philippines should be packed within 48 hours of harvest.

The spice must also be stored at 18 degrees Celsius or below.

All inbound Korean paprika must also undergo inspections by the QIA.

Source: www.bworldonline.com

Publication date: 8/6/2013


FreshPlaza.com