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Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

About halfway through the window during which Mexican growers export mangos to the US, the rate at which mangos have arrived in the US is ahead of last year’s pace.

The National Mango Board projects that total shipments of Mexican mangos into the US will reach 42.1 million boxes this season. Shipments for the season reached 35.6 million boxes during the week ending on June 15, and that’s about three million more boxes than were shipped at the same time last year. Last season’s shipments from Mexico were at 35.7 million boxes for mid-June last year. The week ending June 15, 2013 saw Mexican growers ship 3.3 million boxes of mangos into the US, which means this is when shippers approach peak volumes for the season.

The most popular varieties this season have been the Tommy Atkins and Ataulfo, with those two varieties representing almost 70 percent of the mangos coming into the US from Mexico.

Publication date: 6/28/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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“Spanish citrus sales more difficult than last year”

Gert Bouman, Frutaria:
“Spanish citrus sales more difficult than last year”

Demand for Spanish citrus is currently lagging far behind. That’s what Gert Bouman of Spanish private producer Frutaria says. He points to the recession in Europe as an explanation for the difficult sales – “even worse than last season” – because of which, quite simply, less fruit is sold. “But export to markets outside Europe is also difficult.”


“Of course we see nothing is being sold to Russia. Large volumes weren’t going there anyway, but the produce still has to be sold in other countries. Countries like Poland are also lagging behind this year. The mood is just very lacklustre,” Gert says.  ”We are very busy, but it’s all at very low prices. At the moment, we are fully focusing on retail, because there is little demand on the markets, and you only get low prices. But you’re also seeing promotions on 2 kilos for 99 cents in supermarkets in the Netherlands and Germany. You have to wonder whether that’s good for the industry. The consumer thinks this is the price for an orange, undervaluing the product.”


“The production runs in the south of Spain are good. We ended the Clementine season, and stopped with good quality Navelinas. Now we’re getting the Clemenvilla season started, and we’ve begun with the Salustianas,” Gert says. He thinks a further reorganization of the Spanish citrus sector is unavoidable. The past five years, many cooperatives and private companies have disappeared, a trend which will only continue. With prices like that, there’s no future in the sector, and nobody is enthusiastic about investing in citrus productions, quite the contrary.”


For more information:
Gert Bouman
Frutaria
T: (+34) 661 252 509
M: (+34) 661 252 509
[email protected]
www.frutaria.com

Publication date: 12/17/2014


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US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Northwest apple farmers scramble to save last of their fruit

US: Northwest apple farmers scramble to save last of their fruit

An Arctic air mass has swept into the Northwest. Cold air and snow are expected from central Washington through central Oregon and even into Idaho’s central Panhandle.

Workers at Broetje Orchards in southeast Washington pulled some midnight shifts lately to try and save the last of the apples from the recent Arctic air.

That means farmers in the region are rushing to harvest the last of their apples before the fruit freezes.

In southeast Washington, Joe Shelton manages one of the world’s largest fruit orchards. He said few things are colder than a picking bag full of 30 pounds of 30-degree fruit strapped close to your body.

This week, Shelton has been running crews until midnight trying to save the last of the orchard’s Fujis and Braeburns. All together, Shelton said about 30,000 boxes of apples will probably rot on the trees.

“It’s hard, everyone is kind of deflated, ‘cause we’ve all worked so hard,” Shelton said. “Even all the guys that we have out there picking, it’s like a week shorter of harvest, they could have made another week’s wages. You just hate to see them hanging out there and going to nothing.”

Once apples freeze, they can’t go to the fresh market. And Shelton said juice prices are so low this year it doesn’t pay to pick them.

Source: boisestatepublicradio.org

Publication date: 11/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind pace set last year

Imports of mangos from Mexico this year trail behind the pace set by U.S. importers last season. Prices for the fruit have also been up from last season.

For the week ending on July 19, shipments of mangos from Mexico to the U.S. totalled 3.1 million boxes, which brought the total for the season to 46.6 million boxes. As a comparison, shipments for the same time last season totalled 3.3 million boxes for the week and 52.6 million boxes for the season. Less fruit this season has coincided with higher prices.

“We don’t really know the reason for there being less fruit, but there are fewer mangos around this season,” said Jesse Sepulveda of Vision Produce Company. “This whole season has been unusual, with prices higher than in past years.” The average price per box for Ataulfo mangos for the week ending on July 19 was $ 5.40 and $ 5.96 at Texas and Nogales entry points, respectively. Average price for a box of Tommy Atkins mangos was $ 4.58 at the Texas entry point and $ 4.74 at the Nogales entry point, and the average price for a box of Kent mangos was $ 4.60 at the Texas entry point and $ 4.94 at the Nogales entry point.

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US (CA): Strawberry volume ahead of last year’s pace

Though fluctuating weather conditions have made this a tricky year for California’s growers, strawberry production this season is ahead of what it was at this time last year.

“The season has gone very well, considering all of the weather challenges we’re facing,” said Cindy Jewell, director of marketing for California Giant Berry Farms. “Volume has been consistent, and instead of getting sharp peaks and valleys, volume has come off smooth and consistent. So customers have been supplied in a regular fashion, instead of in swings and gaps.” In addition to smooth supplies, volume has also been ahead of last season. While production from the state’s growers reached 88.3 million flats by this week last year, production this season has reached a little over 90 million flats as of May 22. The timing of this year’s spring holidays has also meant this year’s production has sold quickly.

“Easter was late this year and close to Mother’s Day, so that helped build momentum,” said Jewell. “So retailers were ready to promote when volume was there.” Jewell predicted that the lead the state’s growers have over last year’s production will continue through the rest of the season, into October.

“The fact that we had a light cherry deal also meant strawberries had a dominant space in the produce department,” said Jewell. “So far, this season has gone well, flavour of berries has been great and we’re hoping to continue the positive momentum we’ve had.”

For more information:

Cindy Jewell

California Giant Berry Farms

+1 831 728 1965

FreshPlaza.com

Korean fruit exports more than doubled in last 10 years as result of FTA

Korean fruit exports more than doubled in last 10 years as result of FTA

Both the volume and diversity of Korea’s imported fruits have grown in the past decade since the country first began signing free trade agreements in 2003, the Korea Customs Service said Tuesday.

A trend analysis revealed that Korea’s fruit imports have increased 3.3 times in terms of value and 1.5 times in quantity. Korea imported $ 286 million worth of fruits in 2003 and $ 929 million last year, an average annual growth of 12.5 percent.

The United States has remained Korea’s largest fruit source since 2012 when it provided 37.9 percent of Korea’s imports, while the Association of Southeast Asian Nations was close behind with 35.5 percent, followed by Chile with 17.6 percent and Peru with 1.6 percent.

Imports from FTA nations accounted for over 90 percent of Korea’s total imported fruits, according to the KCS. Most of the imports were tropical fruits that can’t be grown locally such as oranges, bananas, kiwis and pineapples.

In 2003, the biggest fruit imports were oranges at 39.4 percent and bananas in second place at 31.8 percent, but the trend has turned, with bananas coming out on top at 27.3 percent last year, followed by oranges at 21 percent. Grape imports also grew a considerable amount from 7.5 percent in 2003 to 20.3 percent in 2013.

Moreover, with the rise in imports of lemons, mangos, grapefruit and other fruit, the selection is proving to have diversified.

Meanwhile, Korea’s fruit exports in 2013 amounted to $ 120 million, which is 2.2 times more than 10 years ago ― primarily due to larger exports of strawberries and persimmons, the KCS said.

Source: theinsidekorea.com

Publication date: 5/14/2014


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Hy-Vee scores high, Roundy’s dead last in new Greenpeace seafood rankings

Hy-Vee ranked fifth in its first appearance in Greenpeace’s Carting Away the Oceans: 2014 Rankings of Seafood Sustainability in U.S. Supermarkets.

“We were surprised at how well Hy-Vee preformed, by essentially rocketing to fifth place, which is a particularly impressive showing for a new entrant to the evaluations,” said James Mitchell, Greenpeace senior seafood campaigner.

Roundy’s, another newcomer, scored the lowest of the 26 retailers on the list, mainly because it lacks a formal seafood sustainability program.

The top four retailers this year were Whole Foods, Safeway, Wegmans and Trader Joe’s.


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Although Kroger has recently touted its efforts on seafood sustainability, Greenpeace ranked the retailer 20th overall. For the third year in a row, Kroger sold the most products on the Red List, a set of 22 species that Greenpeace says shouldn’t be sold for environmental reasons.

“There’s certainly some retailers that performed worse than Kroger in the rankings — and we’re not trying to let those off the hook by any means — but it’s just the sheer scale of Kroger. It’s such a large retailer that any change it makes is far more significant than the ones that come behind it in the rankings,” said Mitchell.

One trend noted in the report is that several retailers are introducing more sustainable private label canned tuna, some for the first time. Hy-Vee, Safeway, Trader Joe’s, Walmart and Whole Foods all offer such products or plan to do so this summer.

These private label items are price competitive, so consumers don’t have to choose between low-cost and sustainable when shopping for seafood, Mitchell said.

“Americans consume more canned tuna than any other nation on Earth, so that’s a huge win area,” said Mitchell.

Greenpeace voiced concern that recent mergers and acquisitions in the retail sector could have a negative impact on seafood sustainability, given that Harris Teeter’s policies rank much higher than Kroger’s, and Safeway greatly outperforms Albertsons.

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Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

French cherries arrive 15 days earlier, with a crop of 33% higher than last year, according to the Ministry of Agriculture.

In the beginning of May the crop estimates reach 51.800 ton. This is an increase of 33% compared to last year and 20% compared to the average of the last 5 years. However the Ministry also points out that the last 2 years crop were among the lowest.

In the three main regions (PACA, Rhône-Alpes, Languedoc-Roussillon), crops are slightly lower, especially in the south where other crops such as vineyards have replaced orchards. However, warm, dry weather conditions have been favourable to production, explaining the expected increase in harvest.

France is the fourth European producer of cherries, behind Poland, Italy and Hungary.

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

French cherries arrive 15 days earlier, with a crop of 33% higher than last year, according to the Ministry of Agriculture.

In the beginning of May the crop estimates reach 51.800 ton. This is an increase of 33% compared to last year and 20% compared to the average of the last 5 years. However the Ministry also points out that the last 2 years crop were among the lowest.

In the three main regions (PACA, Rhône-Alpes, Languedoc-Roussillon), crops are slightly lower, especially in the south where other crops such as vineyards have replaced orchards. However, warm, dry weather conditions have been favourable to production, explaining the expected increase in harvest.

France is the fourth European producer of cherries, behind Poland, Italy and Hungary.

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

Cherry crop 33% bigger than last year in France

French cherries arrive 15 days earlier, with a crop of 33% higher than last year, according to the Ministry of Agriculture.

In the beginning of May the crop estimates reach 51.800 ton. This is an increase of 33% compared to last year and 20% compared to the average of the last 5 years. However the Ministry also points out that the last 2 years crop were among the lowest.

In the three main regions (PACA, Rhône-Alpes, Languedoc-Roussillon), crops are slightly lower, especially in the south where other crops such as vineyards have replaced orchards. However, warm, dry weather conditions have been favourable to production, explaining the expected increase in harvest.

France is the fourth European producer of cherries, behind Poland, Italy and Hungary.

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com