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Difficult for Hawaii pineapples to ship to mainland

Difficult for Hawaii pineapples to ship to mainland

Pineapple sales in Hawaii remain stable-year round as demands are high, however, the pineapple market on mainland America, particularly the west coast is not so dependable. “The mainland market demand depends on the pineapples America has imported from Central America and Mexico,” states Darren Strand from Maui Gold, “Right now prices are stable, but in a week or two they can change depending on the amount imported.”

Most of the domestically grown pineapple remains in Hawaii, but it is not unusual for growers to ship outside America to Asia. Hawaiian growers are at a disadvantage when shipping within America. “We are eight to twelve days away from America if we ship by boat. South American countries can ship to Los Angeles within three or four days, so they save on length of travel and cost.”

Maui Gold grows pineapples in its 1300 acres of plantation. Despite the fluctuating mainland market, the pineapples are unique through their growing condition. “We are a little further away from the equator than our Central America competitors,” explains Strand, “Along with our fertile volcanic soil, Hawaii’s natural climate of cool nights and hot days help to grow great pineapples.”  

For more information:
Darren Strand
Maui Gold
Phone: (808) 877-3805
[email protected]

Publication date: 10/22/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Jaguar, ‘the fresh company’ set foot in mainland China

Jaguar, ‘the fresh company’ set foot in mainland China

Jaguar tfc have taken their time to study the different options and find the best approach to successfully enter the Chinese market. The two Chinese employees who work at the office in Ridderkerk carried out a lot of preparation which resulted in a full flow of trade from diverse areas of the world to mainland China. The first containers of South African citrus have been well received and sold in China with more to follow.

Jaguar tfc works with a fixed number of importers in remote parts of the country, and tries to link them logistically with containers destined for the general market in  Zhejiang province where they can be loaded as soon as possible at the modern and fast port of Ningbo. The relatively unknown port of Ningbo is the second largest port in the world. They are currently considering a branch office in Shanghai or Ningbo, in order to be more able to monitor the incoming supplies to customers and to keep a closer eye on financial flow and tax benefits.

From 11 to 13 October, Jaguar participated in the Fruveg Expo in Shanghai, a trend setting fair which focuses on the Zhejiang province, where around 50 million people live, but there were also people from other areas of China who visited the Jaguar tfc stand, establishing the possibilities to import good products under the lovely Jaguar brand. The Jaguar brand is particularly well received because it sounds good in Chinese and people appreciate the familiar black boxes with gold print.  Jaguar tfc agrees with its suppliers on which specifications the fruit reaching the Chinese market must meet. At the fair, Jaguar tfc handed out cups of fresh orange juice, which appeared to be a great success!

www.jaguarthefreshcompany.com

Publication date: 10/23/2013


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AU: Mainland cherry growers seek better market access

Caernarvon Cherry Company
AU: Mainland cherry growers seek better market access
Caernarvon Cherry Company cherry season begins in late October and runs through until mid January with the peak harvest period being December. Andrew Gartrell, export development manager at the company and president of the NSW Cherry Growers Association said this year the crops are a little early following the mild Winter conditions. Key export varieties include Tulare, Rons, Chelan, Samba, Bing, Lapin and Sweetheart.


NSW Deputy Premier Andrew Stoner, cherry growers Terry Rossi, Peter West, local member of parliament Andrew Gee, Caernarvon export manager Andrew Gartrell and Caernarvon principal Fiona Hall met recently to discuss improvements to market access protocols and quarantine research for mainland cherry growers to be better able to access export markets with airfreight cherries.

“Caernarvon Cherry Company is based at Orange in central west NSW, drawing fruit from 30 producers across the region and is hopeful that the 2013 harvest will exceed 1500 metric tons or around 15% of the likely Australian cherry crop,” explains Gartrell.

Caernarvon has purchased a GP optical sorting cherry line to ensure that their customers receive the style of cherry best suited to their market.

“We are currently shipping cherries by air to Asia, Europe and the Middle East with key markets being Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia. This season we are supporting our export sales program with extensive promotional activities in a number of Asian supermarket chains. We have identified Indonesia as a key potential growth market for 2013,” said Gartrell.


Sweetheart cherries in full bloom at a Nashdale orchard allied to the Caernarvon Cherry Company.

He goes on to say that they are working with industry associations and the government to develop better airfreight protocols to key Asian markets such as China, Thailand, Taiwan and Philippines, which remain off limits to mainland Australian cherry growers due to non commercial cherry export protocols having been previously developed by industry and government.

Caernarvon was pleased to host a visit recently by deputy NSW premier Andrew Stoner to discuss the current problems confronting mainland Australian cherry growers with market access and the need for government to assist with more targeted quarantine research to aid the development of more workable air freight cherry export protocols. “Fresh airfreight cherries as opposed to cool stored sea freight cherries needs to be our point of difference if we are to carve out a niche in an increasingly more competitive Southern Hemisphere cherry export supply window.”

For more information:
Andrew Gartell
Caernarvon Cherry Company
Tel: + 61 401 338 684
Email: [email protected]
www.cherryco.com.au

Publication date: 10/3/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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