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Mexico launches anti-dumping probe on U.S. apples

WASHINGTON — Mexico’s Economy Secretariat has launched an anti-dumping investigation on U.S. apples in response to a petition filed by fruit growers alleging U.S. apples entered the Mexican market at below fair market rate, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA’s notice says Mexico initiated the antidumping duty investigation on Dec. 4 on U.S. fresh apples shipped from January to December 2013.

The latest action is in response to a petition filed by a regional producer association, the Unión Agrícola Regional de Fruticultores del Estado de Chihuahua, or UNIFRUT. The state of Chihuahua is the largest producer of apples in Mexico.

Interested parties have until Jan. 16, 2015 to submit responses or arguments for consideration by Economía’s Unidad de Prácticas Comerciales Internacionales.

In the meantime, U.S. apple exports are expected to increase this year by 4 percent to 875,000 tons, primarily on rising shipments to Mexico, said a USDA report released this month on the world apple market.

However, USDA said Mexico’s apple production is forecast to drop 22 percent to 670,000 tons, while imports are expected to increase 15 percent to 260,000 tons.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexico Blocks U.S. Hogs at Border Over Diarrheal Disease

U.S. hog farmers exporting to Mexico are going to have more hoops to jump through.

In reaction to a multistage outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea, or PED, among piglets in the U.S., Mexico has officially imposed a ban on further hog imports. This will mean more restrictions and more inspections of U.S. hogs entering Mexico; clearing the border will only occur on a case-by case basis.

PED is a fairly common illnesses among hog populations, with symptoms said to be similar to
gastroenteritis. The current outbreak involves hogs in 13 states. It was first identified by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) on May 17.

Mexico’s National Food Health, Safety and Quality Service (Senasica) has asked USDA for technical information about the PED outbreak and measures being used in the U.S. to prevent it from spreading. The Mexican agency also wants information on actions taken by the U.S. to ensure that exports are safe.

PED is not a reportable disease under the rules of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). It is typically spread by animal-to-animal contact or by contaminated equipment they come into contact with.

In announcing its action at the border, Mexico said it was thing the following preventive actions, including:

  • Asking USDA for its risk mitigation strategies.
  • Increasing epidemiological surveillance of hog farms to spot any spike in pig mortality.
  • Keeping hogs imported prior to May 17 under quarantine.
  • Inspecting locations where hogs were brought into Mexico during the last three months.

So far, Mexico has no reported cases of the disease and plans what it calls “extreme vigilence to keep it that way.

Officially called the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), the illness in hogs has no effect on port safety.”

“Since PEDV is widespread in many countries, it is not a trade-restricting disease, but rather a production-related disease,” according to a National Pork Board statement.

Food Safety News

Mexico becoming first raspberry and blackberry exporter to China

Mexico becoming first raspberry and blackberry exporter to China

SVA Fruits is a joint venture between the Chilean fruit producer San Clemente and Hortifrut. “The company in Shanghai started about 7 years ago with San Clemente, which was one of the first Chilean companies to focus on China as a primary market, and was actually Chile’s largest exporter to Shanghai for many years,” affirms David Smith, Operations Manager at SVA Fruits.

Currently, San Clemente is the fourth largest apple producer in Chile, with around 2.7 million boxes; they also grow cherries, grapes, kiwis, clementines and some other products. “The other parent company, Hortifrut, is the world’s largest blueberry grower, with around 23% of Chile’s entire production, as well as farms in countries like Argentina, Peru, Mexico and Spain. It also owns 30% of Naturipe in the U.S., which means that Hortifrut is their primary representative in China,” explains David.

The big news is that a protocol has been signed between the Mexican and Chinese governments allowing the export of Mexican raspberries and blackberries to China, as no other country has access. David believes that “it is an exciting opportunity that nobody knows how big is going to be, but if we manage to get the right product into their hands, they are going to go crazy for it.”

Blackberries and raspberries have not been grown in China for long, and neither volumes nor quality are very high. According to David, “growing practices are not very developed, so they have a long way to go before catching up with the Western world, but because it’s a new product, consumers are really curious about it.”
David finds the situation comparable to that of blueberries, which only started to take off about 3 to 4 years ago. “I have seen some presentations about blueberry production in China which reveal that, in terms of acreage, they are now the world’s second largest grower, which shows there’s a lot of belief in that product.”

In China, 20% of SVA Fruits’ business goes directly to big name retailers, while the rest goes to wholesalers, which means it already has a wide network of customers. “Conversations about raspberries are still short, but now with the protocol, and only 1-2 months before shipments start, we are definitely ready to go,” concludes David.

Publication date: 11/28/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Avocados from Mexico will run eight major promotions for 2014-15

In the most aggressive marketing plan yet for Mexican avocados in the United States, Avocados from Mexico — which expects to capture a 70 percent market share for the current marketing year, has plans to run eight major promotions this season in what Avocados from Mexico President Alvaro Luque called “the boldest plan we have ever had.”

The campaign consist of five national promotions for the general market presented in key stores throughout the country and three promotions specifically for the Hispanic market.06-MexAvos-AvosFromMex-AlvaAlvaro Luque

The first promotion of the series was launched Sept. 15 in conjunction with Hispanic Heritage month, “and we’ll go up to June without stopping,” Luque said. “We don’t have one month of the year until June 2015 that we are not going to have a promotion out there.”

The next promotion was rolled out Oct. 15. “We are partnering with Conagra RoTel” in RoTel’s sports-related promotion called Hungry for Football, he said. That promotion will feature “our joint recipe” called  Rock & Guac.

Luque said he expects Avocados from Mexico to have more than 7,000 bins of product in the stores for the promotion. It will also involve a free-standing insert and some in-store coupons.

“Right after that promotion, we are going to start one called Guac Fiesta” for the months of December and January, leading up to the Super Bowl weekend. That will be a partnership between Avocados from Mexico and Old El Paso, who is “a great partner. We are going to have a lot of excitement around it.” Old El Paso is “a company, so we are going to have a lot of extra communications in radio and digital that we are working out with them,” Luque said.

“We wanted to develop something different for the brand this year,” so immediately after Guac Fiesta, Avocados from Mexico will roll out a promotion called Fanwich. Having focused on “owning” guacamole during the football season, “we want to  make the switch from guacamole to sandwiches,” he said.

The objective, according to a written statement by Avocados from Mexico to The Produce News, is “to keep momentum strong after the big game through an in-store program and an attractive consumer promotion supported by national media.”

Simultaneously, “we are going to have a crepe promotion, probably partnering with Mission Foods, and we are also  going to have  a foodservice promotion that we are working out with some big partners,” he said. “It is going to be the first time” that Avocados from Mexico has worked promotions “at three different levels at the same time.”

After the Fanwich promotion, “we go immediately into Cinco mode,” Luque said. For the Cinco de Mayo holiday, a prommotion called Ultimate Mexican Fiesta will run April and May with Heiniken and possibly another major brand as partners.

Following Cinco, in May and June Avocados from Mexico will  run a promotion called Summer Salad Festival “to inspire consumers with fresh, healthy new summer salad ideas” using Mexican avocados, according to the written statement.

In parallel with the general market promotions, Avocados from Mexico will run promotions specifically for stores  catering to the Hispanic market, he said. Those will include a Hispanic version of the Cinco festival and, in April and May, a soccer-related promotion “where we are probably going to bring back again, the soccer stars to partner with us” as was the case in 2014.

Supporting the promotions will be an extensive communications strategy, Luque said. It will include an advertising campaign with seven new television ads. “The first four are ready to roll, and we are going to launch our first ad Nov. 11 during the pregame show of the Notre Dame football game,” introducing the new “Made with Love” campaign theme.

In addition to television, starting in October and continuing through May, the campaign will include print and digital ads. The combined effort is expected to build up 16 billion impressions, he said.

Avocados from Mexico will also be doing an extensive re-design of its website, expanding the one website into four: one for the general market, one for Hispanics, one exclusively for the trade, and “for the first time,” one for foodservice, he said. The concepts were unveiled at PMA Fresh  Summit in October and the websites will go live in November.

“The core focus of our plan is to influence avocado consumers to eat more avocados more frequently,” said the written statement.

“We are concentrating our efforts in increasing penetration and frequency with the avocado medium consumers and in building more avocado baskets with the heavy consumers.”

Avocados from Mexico is committed to maintaining and accelerating the growth of avocado consumption in the United States, the statement said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Avocados from Mexico will run eight major promotions for 2014-15

In the most aggressive marketing plan yet for Mexican avocados in the United States, Avocados from Mexico — which expects to capture a 70 percent market share for the current marketing year, has plans to run eight major promotions this season in what Avocados from Mexico President Alvaro Luque called “the boldest plan we have ever had.”

The campaign consist of five national promotions for the general market presented in key stores throughout the country and three promotions specifically for the Hispanic market.06-MexAvos-AvosFromMex-AlvaAlvaro Luque

The first promotion of the series was launched Sept. 15 in conjunction with Hispanic Heritage month, “and we’ll go up to June without stopping,” Luque said. “We don’t have one month of the year until June 2015 that we are not going to have a promotion out there.”

The next promotion was rolled out Oct. 15. “We are partnering with Conagra RoTel” in RoTel’s sports-related promotion called Hungry for Football, he said. That promotion will feature “our joint recipe” called  Rock & Guac.

Luque said he expects Avocados from Mexico to have more than 7,000 bins of product in the stores for the promotion. It will also involve a free-standing insert and some in-store coupons.

“Right after that promotion, we are going to start one called Guac Fiesta” for the months of December and January, leading up to the Super Bowl weekend. That will be a partnership between Avocados from Mexico and Old El Paso, who is “a great partner. We are going to have a lot of excitement around it.” Old El Paso is “a company, so we are going to have a lot of extra communications in radio and digital that we are working out with them,” Luque said.

“We wanted to develop something different for the brand this year,” so immediately after Guac Fiesta, Avocados from Mexico will roll out a promotion called Fanwich. Having focused on “owning” guacamole during the football season, “we want to  make the switch from guacamole to sandwiches,” he said.

The objective, according to a written statement by Avocados from Mexico to The Produce News, is “to keep momentum strong after the big game through an in-store program and an attractive consumer promotion supported by national media.”

Simultaneously, “we are going to have a crepe promotion, probably partnering with Mission Foods, and we are also  going to have  a foodservice promotion that we are working out with some big partners,” he said. “It is going to be the first time” that Avocados from Mexico has worked promotions “at three different levels at the same time.”

After the Fanwich promotion, “we go immediately into Cinco mode,” Luque said. For the Cinco de Mayo holiday, a prommotion called Ultimate Mexican Fiesta will run April and May with Heiniken and possibly another major brand as partners.

Following Cinco, in May and June Avocados from Mexico will  run a promotion called Summer Salad Festival “to inspire consumers with fresh, healthy new summer salad ideas” using Mexican avocados, according to the written statement.

In parallel with the general market promotions, Avocados from Mexico will run promotions specifically for stores  catering to the Hispanic market, he said. Those will include a Hispanic version of the Cinco festival and, in April and May, a soccer-related promotion “where we are probably going to bring back again, the soccer stars to partner with us” as was the case in 2014.

Supporting the promotions will be an extensive communications strategy, Luque said. It will include an advertising campaign with seven new television ads. “The first four are ready to roll, and we are going to launch our first ad Nov. 11 during the pregame show of the Notre Dame football game,” introducing the new “Made with Love” campaign theme.

In addition to television, starting in October and continuing through May, the campaign will include print and digital ads. The combined effort is expected to build up 16 billion impressions, he said.

Avocados from Mexico will also be doing an extensive re-design of its website, expanding the one website into four: one for the general market, one for Hispanics, one exclusively for the trade, and “for the first time,” one for foodservice, he said. The concepts were unveiled at PMA Fresh  Summit in October and the websites will go live in November.

“The core focus of our plan is to influence avocado consumers to eat more avocados more frequently,” said the written statement.

“We are concentrating our efforts in increasing penetration and frequency with the avocado medium consumers and in building more avocado baskets with the heavy consumers.”

Avocados from Mexico is committed to maintaining and accelerating the growth of avocado consumption in the United States, the statement said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Avocados from Mexico will run eight major promotions for 2014-15

In the most aggressive marketing plan yet for Mexican avocados in the United States, Avocados from Mexico — which expects to capture a 70 percent market share for the current marketing year, has plans to run eight major promotions this season in what Avocados from Mexico President Alvaro Luque called “the boldest plan we have ever had.”

The campaign consist of five national promotions for the general market presented in key stores throughout the country and three promotions specifically for the Hispanic market.06-MexAvos-AvosFromMex-AlvaAlvaro Luque

The first promotion of the series was launched Sept. 15 in conjunction with Hispanic Heritage month, “and we’ll go up to June without stopping,” Luque said. “We don’t have one month of the year until June 2015 that we are not going to have a promotion out there.”

The next promotion was rolled out Oct. 15. “We are partnering with Conagra RoTel” in RoTel’s sports-related promotion called Hungry for Football, he said. That promotion will feature “our joint recipe” called  Rock & Guac.

Luque said he expects Avocados from Mexico to have more than 7,000 bins of product in the stores for the promotion. It will also involve a free-standing insert and some in-store coupons.

“Right after that promotion, we are going to start one called Guac Fiesta” for the months of December and January, leading up to the Super Bowl weekend. That will be a partnership between Avocados from Mexico and Old El Paso, who is “a great partner. We are going to have a lot of excitement around it.” Old El Paso is “a company, so we are going to have a lot of extra communications in radio and digital that we are working out with them,” Luque said.

“We wanted to develop something different for the brand this year,” so immediately after Guac Fiesta, Avocados from Mexico will roll out a promotion called Fanwich. Having focused on “owning” guacamole during the football season, “we want to  make the switch from guacamole to sandwiches,” he said.

The objective, according to a written statement by Avocados from Mexico to The Produce News, is “to keep momentum strong after the big game through an in-store program and an attractive consumer promotion supported by national media.”

Simultaneously, “we are going to have a crepe promotion, probably partnering with Mission Foods, and we are also  going to have  a foodservice promotion that we are working out with some big partners,” he said. “It is going to be the first time” that Avocados from Mexico has worked promotions “at three different levels at the same time.”

After the Fanwich promotion, “we go immediately into Cinco mode,” Luque said. For the Cinco de Mayo holiday, a prommotion called Ultimate Mexican Fiesta will run April and May with Heiniken and possibly another major brand as partners.

Following Cinco, in May and June Avocados from Mexico will  run a promotion called Summer Salad Festival “to inspire consumers with fresh, healthy new summer salad ideas” using Mexican avocados, according to the written statement.

In parallel with the general market promotions, Avocados from Mexico will run promotions specifically for stores  catering to the Hispanic market, he said. Those will include a Hispanic version of the Cinco festival and, in April and May, a soccer-related promotion “where we are probably going to bring back again, the soccer stars to partner with us” as was the case in 2014.

Supporting the promotions will be an extensive communications strategy, Luque said. It will include an advertising campaign with seven new television ads. “The first four are ready to roll, and we are going to launch our first ad Nov. 11 during the pregame show of the Notre Dame football game,” introducing the new “Made with Love” campaign theme.

In addition to television, starting in October and continuing through May, the campaign will include print and digital ads. The combined effort is expected to build up 16 billion impressions, he said.

Avocados from Mexico will also be doing an extensive re-design of its website, expanding the one website into four: one for the general market, one for Hispanics, one exclusively for the trade, and “for the first time,” one for foodservice, he said. The concepts were unveiled at PMA Fresh  Summit in October and the websites will go live in November.

“The core focus of our plan is to influence avocado consumers to eat more avocados more frequently,” said the written statement.

“We are concentrating our efforts in increasing penetration and frequency with the avocado medium consumers and in building more avocado baskets with the heavy consumers.”

Avocados from Mexico is committed to maintaining and accelerating the growth of avocado consumption in the United States, the statement said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Officials anticipate slightly reduced New Mexico onion volume

Katie Goetz, public information officer for the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, said the effects of winter weather are expected to reduce the state’s onion volume slightly in 2013. “New Mexico experienced a cooler-than-normal winter which affected the crop yield for over-winter onions,” she told The Produce News. “Yields are down a bit but not drastically. Some of the early onions might not size like they normally do. But spring-seeded onions should yield and size normally.”

New Mexico is home to approximately 20 onion growers and shippers concentrated in the southern part of the state. “A little more than half of the state’s onion acreage is typically in Dona Ana County, while the remainder is grown in Luna and Sierra counties,” she said. The majority of production is conventional.

OpenerShot-NM-OnionsAt the peak of summer harvest, New Mexico is a major onion supplier for the nation. (Photo courtesy of 20/20 Produce Sales Inc.)All onions grown are non-storage. “New Mexico onion growers produce mostly yellows,” Goetz went on to say. “But there are some whites and some reds. The major varieties of commercially grown New Mexico onions include Grano, Granex, Sweet Spanish and midsummer hybrids such as the popular Nu-Mex variety.”

The state’s onion shipping season begins in late May and generally continues to late August. According to Goetz, some sheds can ship through mid-September. “The retail market is the biggest market for New Mexico onions,” she said. “But a few shippers also sell them through the foodservice and/or processing channels.”

In addition to the domestic marketplace, onions grown in New Mexico are marketed in Canada and Mexico.

On June 10, the National Agricultural Statistics Service New Mexico Field Office of the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported on the condition of New Mexico’s onion crop. “Onion conditions ranged from fair to excellent,” the report stated, noting that 22 percent of the crop had been harvested.

On June 17, the National Potato and Onion Report provided data about pricing of the 2013 New Mexico Onion crop. Demand that day was moderate. Pricing for yellow Grano 50-pound sacks of super colossals was $ 12; colossals were $ 9-$ 10; jumbos were $ 8-$ 9; and mediums were $ 9. Repack sizes were $ 7-$ 8.

Fifty-pound sacks of jumbo white onions sold for $ 12-$ 14, and mediums sold for $ 10-$ 12. Twenty-five pound sacks of Red globe jumbos sold for $ 9-$ 10, and mediums sold for $ 7-$ 9.

In its report, Vegetables (September 2012), NASS provided historical data on New Mexico’s onion crop. According to the report, growers planted a total of 5,500 acres in 2012, down 10 percent from 2011. Growers harvested 5,400 acres in 2012, down 9 percent from the previous crop year. The production level for 2012 was set at 2.9 million hundredweight, up 9 percent from 2011.

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US: Short crop from Mexico makes for tight mango market

With fewer mangos coming from Mexico, the market for mangos in the United States is tight. Peak volumes from Brazil are still a couple of weeks away and peak volumes from Ecuador are more than a month away, so the gap in supplies could mean strong prices for several weeks.

“Supplies from Mexico are finishing up,” said Gary Clevenger of Freska Produce International. “Overall volume is down from last year.” As of the fourth week in September, mango imports from Mexico totalled just over 57 million boxes. The total imports from Mexico for the same week last year were almost 15 million boxes more than that. While imports this year kept pace with those from last year for most of the season, the last couple of months have seen a drop in the amount of fruit arriving from Mexico. While imports from Mexico were almost 700,000 boxes for the fourth week of September in 2013, this year’s weekly shipments for the fourth week of September were just over 250,000 boxes.

Because supplies from Mexico dropped off earlier than usual, there’s a larger gap between the Mexican season and the Brazilian season.

“Brazil is at peak packing this week, so we’ll see those arrivals around the middle of October,” said Clevenger. “Ecuador won’t peak until mid to late November.” That’s making for stiff prices. As of October 2, F.O.B. prices for fruit arriving in Philadelphia from South America ranged between $ 9.00 and $ 10.50 for a box of Tommy Atkins mangos.

“Prices are higher due to less volume and Mexico ending earlier,” explained Clevenger. “We’re going to have a serious gap for the next couple of weeks, so prices will remain high. The market will remain steady from now until the middle of October, then we’ll have peak volumes out of Brazil.”

For more information:

Gary Clevenger

Freska Produce International

+1 805 650 1040

FreshPlaza.com

Mexico: Raspberries and blackberries to be shipped to China

Mexico: Raspberries and blackberries to be shipped to China

Mexican raspberries and blackberries will start being shipped to the Chinese market not later than November, after officials of the Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food and of the Administration for Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) of China approved the necessary protocols. 

It is worth noting that the future is looking bright for red fruit exports, a worldwide consumption levels are on the rise and Mexico has established itself as a major supplier.

Mexico’s blueberry, strawberry and blackberry production was the highest in history last year, growing at an annual rate of 22.1%. The country’s main customers are the United States, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, which together account for 475 million dollars in revenue. 

The visit of the chief director of the National Health Service, Food Safety and Quality, Enrique Sanchez Cruz to the AQSIQ’s offices in the People’s Republic of China, confirmed the “friendship and good understanding between the two organisations, which has developed for over six years,” the entity said.

During this period we have successfully negotiated health protocols for avocados, grapes, pears, apples, pork, beef, and recently, raspberry and blackberry.

Both delegations confirmed that solid steps have been taken in recent years to facilitate safe bilateral trade in sanitary terms, generating increasing trust and understanding.

The signing of the protocols will entail great opportunities for Mexican producers and will help in strengthening the country’s position as a leading horticultural exporter.


Source: eleconomista.com.mx

Publication date: 9/24/2014


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Mexico: Oil spill affects 10,000 tons of orange in Nuevo Leon

Mexico: Oil spill affects 10,000 tons of orange in Nuevo Leon

Producers from the Township of Cadereyta Jiménez estimated that at least 10,000 tons of oranges had been lost because of the lack of irrigation caused by the oil spill into the San Juan River that a clandestine outlet on Pemex’s pipeline caused. 

The producers presented their estimates at a meeting with deputies of the Special Investigative Committee of the oil spill in the San Juan River.  According to Francisco Javier Limon Guzman, deputy of Santa Isabel’s common land, the orange trees haven’t been irrigated since August 16, when the clandestine outlet on kilometre 463.5 of the Madero-Cadereyta pipeline was detected. 

“There are two or three early orange varieties, one is cut at the beginning of the month, and, in fact we already lost that one. Then there is the late orange, which we can start cutting from December 15. We are talking about 20,000 tons in all the area,” he said. 

Half of that amount, he said, would result in beeing affected by the ecological contingency in the San Juan River, so we would need to bring citrus from other areas of the country to supply local demand. Limón Guzmán noted that the authorities are aware of the issue and have been waiting for Pemex to perform actions to clean up the affected area. 

Within this process, he said, the landowners have presented documents that show which plots have been affected and are expecting compensation from Pemex. 

“We need to water the trees so that the fruit can develop and so that the trees can bloom next year. Hence, this is affecting us,” he said in an interview. 

“Yes we will be affected. One of our production is its developmental stage and the other is about to be cut, but when the tree lacks water it feeds from itself so the oranges become loose and start lacking juice,” he said. 

It was agreed, at the meeting with local representatives, that the needs of the affected population would be monitored in order to try the ecological problem more quickly. 

Source: 20minutos.com.mx

Publication date: 9/15/2014


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Mexico: Price of oranges increased by 90% compared to 2013

Mexico: Price of oranges increased by 90% compared to 2013

The price of oranges in Mexico continues to rise. According to the SNIIM, last week prices increased by 5.49 percent, amounting to an average 90.24 percent from a year ago. 

The agency detailed in its most recent report that the wholesales prices for the small calibres of Valencia orange were at 9.10 pesos per kilogram, 4.6 percent more than the 8.70 pesos price they had a week ago. 

The records detail that the same fruit was being traded at an average of 4.22 pesos per kilogram a year ago, so the current price for this variety has increased by 115.63 percent. 

The SNIIM said that the prices of the medium calibres of this citric rose from 9.40 pesos to 10 pesos per kilogram; i.e. a 6.38 percent increase. 

A year ago, this fruit was worth 5.82 pesos per kilogram, thus its price has increased by 71.82 percent in one year. 

In its report, the agency explained that the country’s supply of this fruit is limited because, currently, only the mayera variety from Veracruz is in its harvest season. 

The report also said that this harvest was smaller in magnitude compared to the 2,150,000 tons harvested in the same cycle last year. 

“Consequently, the average price increased a little more,” stated the report. 

“We expect that some volumes of the ramillete orange, also from Veracruz, will enter the market in the next fortnight, which might help stop or moderate the upward trend in prices.” 

Source: noticiasnet.mx

Publication date: 8/26/2014


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As California avocado crop winds down, Mexico gearing up to fill demand

With a total crop volume at only 60 percent of a year ago, the California avocado season is winding down as Mexico gears up to fill demand.

Ron Araiza, director of sales for Mission Produce Inc. in Oxnard, CA, told The Produce News Aug. 20 that California was expected to send around 6 million cartons of fruit to market this week and reduce its volume by around 1 million cartons per week for the next several weeks. That means California would send around 4 million cartons to market during the Labor Day week of Sept. 1.

That’s a far cry from the typical demand of about 35 million cartons per week.

“During September, we [avocado shippers] are going to be looking to Mexico to provide 25 [million] to 28 million cartons per week,” he said.

The total California crop is expected to come in somewhere around 300 million pounds when all is said and done, which is 40 percent less than last year’s volume of close to 500 million pounds.

Phil Henry, president of Henry Avocado Corp. in Escondido, CA, said that by mid-August, California growers were at about 273 million pounds. He anticipated shipments throughout September, albeit at a relatively low level.

“Three hundred million is possible,” he said. “We may get there.”

Like most of the industry, Henry Avocado sources from many different countries of origin and attempts to fill the orders of its customers relatively seamlessly. While there is a market price differential depending upon origin, the key is simply to fill demand.

As August turns into September, there will still be some Peruvian avocados being sold from inventory and Chile is expected to have a very limited volume of avocados for sale within the United States by early September.

Henry said Mexico will supply most of the country, while most shipments of California avocados will stay close to home to fill the Golden State’s cavernous demand for the fruit.

One California area gearing up for that September time slot is the Morro Bay avocado deal from California’s Central Coast, marketed under that name. Over the last couple of years, growers in California’s furthest avocado-producing region have been creating a niche market for their fruit, which they claim has superior taste because climatic conditions require the fruit to stay on the tree almost twice as long as other areas.

Jim Shanley of Shanley Farms in Morro Bay, CA, said a couple of growers are out of the deal this year because of drought issues, but he has added two other growers and should have volume similar to what the deal had last year for the eight-week shipping season. The deal was expected to kick off on Labor Day and last through October.

“It will be similar to last year, but we won’t be able to grow it this year,” he said.

Shanley is expecting get a premium for that fruit in the high $ 30s. In fact, in mid-August California fruit was selling for top dollar in the high $ 30s. Peruvian fruit was at least $ 10 less per carton than that, and Mexican avocados were somewhere in between, with that price dependent on the origin of the fruit.

As September unfolds, Mexican growers will be shipping from several different blooms depending upon the location of the trees where the crop is harvested. By the end of September, the new crop for the new season will be on the market.

Chile, which comes into the U.S. market during the fall months, is expected to have less volume this year than last, according to Henry. He said the Chilean drought is still affecting volume and Chilean shippers have several options for their fruit, including Europe and other South American countries. They are no longer so heavily dependent on the U.S. market.

While promotions from the California avocado industry will wind down after Labor Day, Mexico is increasing its visibility in the marketplace. Its first promotion of the season is sports-themed and designed to kick off the U.S. football season as well as the Mexican avocado season.

 

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