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Polish apple growers focus on Far and Middle East

Polish apple growers focus on Far and Middle East

The Russian ban on European goods has made it tough for Polish apple exporters. The of those exporters, Elpa Fruit, will look to weather the tough situation by diverting some of the fruit that was destined for the Russian market to the Far East.

 

“It will be a difficult year with a lot of challenges,” said Michal Grodzki, manager for Elpa Fruit. “It will be very difficult for Polish growers who sent their apples to Russia, and I’m especially worried for smaller growers, for whom bankruptcy is a very real possibility.” About 60 to 70 percent of the apples grown in Poland go to Russia and Belarus during normal years, so a huge part of this year’s crop will need to go elsewhere. The domestic market only takes five percent of production, so it’s not likely it can absorb much of what used to go to Russia. Western Europe has plenty of fruit of its own, so the competition there doesn’t make that market a realistic option. But the Far and Middle East and North Africa are good options.


“Most Polish companies will focus on markets where they’ve already sent fruit,” said Grodzki. “You’re always trying to find new markets, but we’ve already exported to the Netherlands, France, Italy, United Arab Emirates, Egypt,Tunisia and Scandinavia around 20% while 10% of our production to the domestic market.”


Serbia, Romania, Kuwait, India and China are all examples of new markets that could take additional fruit in the future, but the difficulty of securing new contacts and building an export program in a new territory means most exporters will focus on the Middle East.


“There are a lot of possibilities, but it’s not easy to establish a new market. It takes a lot of time and a lot of work to find and work with new customers,” explained Grodzki. “So at the moment the main targets are the Emirates and Egypt, because they know our apples.” He noted that consumers in that region are familiar with their varieties and prefer red apples, like Royal Gala, Gloucester, Red Jonaprince, Golden Delicious and Ida Red varieties. Those apples are favored because consumers there know those varieties through their dealings with Western European brokers. But introducing new varieties may be an option, as consumers in the region simply aren’t aware of most other varieties.

Without Russia as an export destination, there’s more competition for the markets available. As a result, prices this year have been 40 to 50 percent lower than in previous years. It’s a grim market, at the moment, but one which Polish growers are doing everything they can to weather.

“Russia is such a huge market, so I don’t think we’ll be able to switch all of the fruit we sent there to other markets – I wish it were possible, but it’s probably not,” said Grodzki. “I just hope that the situation gets better in a few months.”

Contact details:

Michał Grodzki
Elpa Fruit Co. Ltd
Poland
Tel./fax: +48 48 668 00 04
Mobile : +48 +48 502 093 397
E-mail: [email protected],
[email protected]
www.elpafruit.pl
Skype: elpafruit1

Author: Yzza Ibrahim / Carlos Nunez


 

Publication date: 10/10/2014


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Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East

Grupo Fischer
Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East


The Brazilian Grupo Fischer was created in 1932 by the German Carl Fischer, but only started expanding exponentially from the 1960’s with the construction of Citrosuco’s juice processing plant.
                    
The Citrosuco division, devoted to the production of orange juice, introduced the means for offshore transportation, and in 1985 it started working also with apples in Fraiburgo, Santa Catarina. Today the group is formed by both the orange juice and apple production segments.

The Apple Businesses currently owns around 2,500 hectares of apple plantations, almost 3,000 hectares of pines (for wood extraction); it produces about 1,200 tonnes of kiwis per year and another part is devoted to seeds, soya beans, corn, etc., although apples are the core of the business.

Fischer’s apple production reaches 150,000 tonnes per year; 60% Gala and 40% Fuji. “We believe that the Royal Gala in our country is the best in the world, not only in terms of colour, but also flavour. When it comes to Fuji, it has a good colour and flavour as well, although the shape is flat.  explains Wilson Passos, commercial manager of Fischer.

80% of the fruit (both Gala and Fuji) is distributed in the domestic market and 20% is exported, mostly to Europe (Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands and Germany) and the Middle East. Wilson affirms that “we are also trying to expand to India and Russia for next year.”

Winnie Hsia , export analist, adds that “we already had some business with Russia six years ago, and it is not an easy market, as they demand cheaper fruit and big sizes. We also ask for advanced payment of 90% of the costs.” Rafael Negrini says that we are working with a government agency  APEX to find potential importers. We are also going to Moscow’s next fair in September.”

One of Fischer’s most noteworthy aspects in terms of marketing is its brand “Turma da Monica” (Monica’s gang), based on a famous character in Brazil. “We have had this brand for 20 years, and its main principle is to promote fruit consumption amongst children. All the small-sized Cat-1 fruit ranging between 150 and 216 goes directly to this brand,” affirms Wilson.


Las Manzanas “Turma da Monica”

Despite being targeted at children, the brand has however become famous amongst other segments, mainly because “the fruit is smaller and suitable for a snack and it has a great sweet taste; it can also be easily stored in the refrigerator,” explains Rafael.

Wilson assures that Fischer is also constantly in touch with consumers by means of a phone number, which they can use to report problems or give suggestions. “We also frequently conduct market researches in collaboration with supermarkets when we introduce new varieties, and this is another way to be in contact with the market.”

“We are always working in the development of new varieties to improve aspects such as colour, reducing the application of agricultural pesticides, improving their resistance to pests and increasing their shelf life,” affirms Wilson.

Fischer also makes great efforts in terms of traceability, which is enforced for the entire production. Wilson assures that “we also strive to meet the requirements for every certification that our clients demand, including Global G.A.P., BRC or HACCP and the enforcement of good practices in both packing houses and plantations.” Rafael adds that “Fischer is really oriented towards sustainability and reducing waste, inspecting all processes from harvest to final sale, including sorting and transport.”
In terms of future plans, Fischer is currently researching new clones in an effort to expand its range of varieties, focusing on Royal Gala apples, aiming to increase its market share by 20-30%, both domestically and internationally and to cover the growing demand from its clients.

“Russia and India are promising markets for us in this direction. We already have a good relationship with a company in India, but the problem in that market is that there is a need of more clarity about what to include in the phytosanitary certification, as there are numerous rules in place to protect the domestic production, ” explains Wilson.

Rafael adds that “we have asked the Brazilian authorities to negotiate to make the process easier. Last season we were not able to get the necessary certifications, but next year we expect to be able to enter the Indian market.”

 “Fischer’s main philosophy is to always deliver what was committed with our customers,” concludes the commercial manager.
 

Publication date: 9/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East

Grupo Fischer
Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East


The Brazilian Grupo Fischer was created in 1932 by the German Carl Fischer, but only started expanding exponentially from the 1960’s with the construction of Citrosuco’s juice processing plant.
                    
The Citrosuco division, devoted to the production of orange juice, introduced the means for offshore transportation, and in 1985 it started working also with apples in Fraiburgo, Santa Catarina. Today the group is formed by both the orange juice and apple production segments.

The Apple Businesses currently owns around 2,500 hectares of apple plantations, almost 3,000 hectares of pines (for wood extraction); it produces about 1,200 tonnes of kiwis per year and another part is devoted to seeds, soya beans, corn, etc., although apples are the core of the business.

Fischer’s apple production reaches 150,000 tonnes per year; 60% Gala and 40% Fuji. “We believe that the Royal Gala in our country is the best in the world, not only in terms of colour, but also flavour. When it comes to Fuji, it has a good colour and flavour as well, although the shape is flat.  explains Wilson Passos, commercial manager of Fischer.

80% of the fruit (both Gala and Fuji) is distributed in the domestic market and 20% is exported, mostly to Europe (Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands and Germany) and the Middle East. Wilson affirms that “we are also trying to expand to India and Russia for next year.”

Winnie Hsia , export analist, adds that “we already had some business with Russia six years ago, and it is not an easy market, as they demand cheaper fruit and big sizes. We also ask for advanced payment of 90% of the costs.” Rafael Negrini says that we are working with a government agency  APEX to find potential importers. We are also going to Moscow’s next fair in September.”

One of Fischer’s most noteworthy aspects in terms of marketing is its brand “Turma da Monica” (Monica’s gang), based on a famous character in Brazil. “We have had this brand for 20 years, and its main principle is to promote fruit consumption amongst children. All the small-sized Cat-1 fruit ranging between 150 and 216 goes directly to this brand,” affirms Wilson.


Las Manzanas “Turma da Monica”

Despite being targeted at children, the brand has however become famous amongst other segments, mainly because “the fruit is smaller and suitable for a snack and it has a great sweet taste; it can also be easily stored in the refrigerator,” explains Rafael.

Wilson assures that Fischer is also constantly in touch with consumers by means of a phone number, which they can use to report problems or give suggestions. “We also frequently conduct market researches in collaboration with supermarkets when we introduce new varieties, and this is another way to be in contact with the market.”

“We are always working in the development of new varieties to improve aspects such as colour, reducing the application of agricultural pesticides, improving their resistance to pests and increasing their shelf life,” affirms Wilson.

Fischer also makes great efforts in terms of traceability, which is enforced for the entire production. Wilson assures that “we also strive to meet the requirements for every certification that our clients demand, including Global G.A.P., BRC or HACCP and the enforcement of good practices in both packing houses and plantations.” Rafael adds that “Fischer is really oriented towards sustainability and reducing waste, inspecting all processes from harvest to final sale, including sorting and transport.”
In terms of future plans, Fischer is currently researching new clones in an effort to expand its range of varieties, focusing on Royal Gala apples, aiming to increase its market share by 20-30%, both domestically and internationally and to cover the growing demand from its clients.

“Russia and India are promising markets for us in this direction. We already have a good relationship with a company in India, but the problem in that market is that there is a need of more clarity about what to include in the phytosanitary certification, as there are numerous rules in place to protect the domestic production, ” explains Wilson.

Rafael adds that “we have asked the Brazilian authorities to negotiate to make the process easier. Last season we were not able to get the necessary certifications, but next year we expect to be able to enter the Indian market.”

 “Fischer’s main philosophy is to always deliver what was committed with our customers,” concludes the commercial manager.
 

Publication date: 9/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Solarelli stonefruit doing well in the Middle East

Ilenio Bastoni (Apofruit)
Italy: Solarelli stonefruit doing well in the Middle East

“After the positive test of 2013, this year we have increased the stores in the UAE that sell our Solarelli products,” explains Ilenio Bastoni from Apofruit Italia.


Promotions were carried out also throughout the Ramadan, which will end on 27th July: “in one single month, we shipped 150 pallets of stonefruit (peaches, nectarines, apricots and cherries), i.e. over 75 tons of fruit.”


“We have also increased our exports to Saudi Arabia. We currently reach these markets by air, but we are also considering shipping the medium-late varieties by sea.”


In a normal season, the 2-3 weeks needed for maritime transports should not be a problem even for perishable goods, but the bad weather this year affected shelf-life.”


“Internalisation is helping tackle the summer fruit crisis, but the fact that flight costs are high means less countries can afford them. The Middle East is a strategic market, which can guarantee interesting prices for high-quality produce, but we cannot put all our hope on that. Still, we will dedicate a lot of attention to it.”


Contacts:
Apofruit Italia

Viale della Cooperazione, 400
47522 Pievesestina di Cesena (FC)
Tel.: (+39) 0547 414822
Fax: (+39) 0547 414867
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.apofruit.it

Publication date: 7/22/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Opportunities and difficulties for exporters in the Middle East

Opportunities and difficulties for exporters in the Middle East

For the French fruit producer and exporter Blue Whale, as well as for many others, the Middle East has become an area of great interest with key trading partners. It is, however, a region with many countries in different circumstances offering various conditions for exporters.

“In the Middle East, only a few countries are able to import quantities of quality fruit and pay the right price; countries such as Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates, where the situation looks stable, and there is no risk of currency crisis (as linked to US$ ), are among them,” explains Marc Peyres, of Blue Whale.

Marc affirms that, “it is difficult to assess whether economic difficulties significantly affect the fresh fruit business, as for us, the most influential factors are the fruit supply, the currency situation (Euro against US$ ) or when the stock from the Southern Hemisphere will become available.”

Naturally, both the global and the domestic situations affect the Gulf area. “Dubai, for instance, is a big regional hub, and if countries around it suffer crises, it disturbs regional business. On the other hand, if Europe’s currency offers better conditions, less fruit is imported from America and other regional markets (e.g. Iran apples etc.) resulting in a better balance between supply and demand for me,” assures Marc.

In the end, political turbulences are bad for everybody, but mostly for the local population. “Political and economic circumstances, like the weather, are always changing, so businesses need to learn to be flexible and to adapt,” concludes Marc.
For his part, a South African citrus exporter dealing with the Middle East, stated that, “all our customers are nervous about the situation in Iraq, as more than 20% of fruit re-exported out of Dubai goes to Iraq. If the Iraq conflict escalates, this business will be affected.”

Meanwhile, the Syrian conflict has been ongoing for 4 years and it has led to businesses not being able to sell on the scale that they could before. “The Syrian conflict has definitely affected the fruit/vegetable business between Turkey and the Middle East, in particular for lemons,” affirms the exporter. “The current situation in Egypt, however, has not affected its export business too much.”

The bulk of trade in the Middle East is done in Saudi Arabian Riyals (SR) and UAE Dirhams (Dhs) both of which are strong and fixed to the US$ permanently at US$ 1.00 = SR/Dhs 3.674. The Kuwaiti Dinar and the Oman/Qatar/Bahrain currencies are all very strong, as well.

In terms of logistics, transportation problems can occur when trucking, for example, from Turkey to the Middle East, as the trucks have to go through Syria, which is a risk. Likewise, trucking into Iraq entails similar risks and this increases the cost and prices of fruit.

All in all, and as stated by Marc Peyres, the Middle East is a region offering great opportunities for business, but also where companies need to be prepared to be flexible to tackle any problems that are always sure to surface.

Publication date: 7/11/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Jordan: Logistical challenges and opportunities for Middle East produce

Jordan: Logistical challenges and opportunities for Middle East produce

Some of the challenges of fresh produce growers in the Middle East have to do with water scarcity, which is partly due to the situation in the region. Within this context, the company AgriJordan, based in Amman, has become a pioneer in the promotion of sustainable agricultural practices. The company employs the most updated technologies and strategies in water management, packing, export and marketing.

AgriJordan produces many kinds of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers, melons and aubergines and two of its most important destinations are currently Turkey and Eastern Europe, where the produce from the Jordan Valley, shipped in refrigerated trucks, has found some good market opportunities.
The company’s logistics strategy, however, has been tremendously affected since Syria’s problems started and consequently, attempts have been made to find alternative routes to reach its destinations in the shortest time, striving for the produce to arrive in its freshest state, but without pushing costs to unsustainable levels.

According to Mohammed Bataineh, from AgriJordan, “we have been working with the governments of Turkey and Israel to promote the use of the route via Haifa, despite the fact that it also has some drawbacks, such as some delays and an increase in costs because of border controls.”

A lot of the company’s produce is shipped to the Gulf market, which only requires two to three days shipping time from Jordan and this gives it an advantage over its competitors in Egypt (and other African countries) and even Israel which cannot ship directly to GCC countries.

The firm has been trying to capitalise on Jordan’s stability and security compared to its neighbouring countries, trying to turn the situation into a stepping stone, not only for its agricultural produce, but also to attract others to establish themselves in the country and serve the area from Jordan.

Interest has been growing amongst European producers to expand in countries in the Middle East, like United Arab Emirates, and this is also the case for AgriJordan, which has been gaining market share in various destinations in the area, including UAE, Qatar, Kuwait and even Saudi Arabia, which had enforced prohibitions on Jordanian products for many years.

“We are finding that, despite the risks involved, the boom in the Gulf market provided Jordan with a great chance to explore new opportunities that are currently turning out to be quite lucrative for us,” concludes Mohammed Bataineh.

For more information:
Zahran Plaza, 7th circle
P.O. Box: 140825, Amman, 11814, Jordan
Tel: +962 6 5503245
agrijordan.com/welcome

Publication date: 4/29/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Jordan: Logistical challenges and opportunities for Middle East produce

Jordan: Logistical challenges and opportunities for Middle East produce

Some of the challenges of fresh produce growers in the Middle East have to do with water scarcity, which is partly due to the situation in the region. Within this context, the company AgriJordan, based in Amman, has become a pioneer in the promotion of sustainable agricultural practices. The company employs the most updated technologies and strategies in water management, packing, export and marketing.

AgriJordan produces many kinds of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers, melons and aubergines and two of its most important destinations are currently Turkey and Eastern Europe, where the produce from the Jordan Valley, shipped in refrigerated trucks, has found some good market opportunities.
The company’s logistics strategy, however, has been tremendously affected since Syria’s problems started and consequently, attempts have been made to find alternative routes to reach its destinations in the shortest time, striving for the produce to arrive in its freshest state, but without pushing costs to unsustainable levels.

According to Mohammed Bataineh, from AgriJordan, “we have been working with the governments of Turkey and Israel to promote the use of the route via Haifa, despite the fact that it also has some drawbacks, such as some delays and an increase in costs because of border controls.”

A lot of the company’s produce is shipped to the Gulf market, which only requires two to three days shipping time from Jordan and this gives it an advantage over its competitors in Egypt (and other African countries) and even Israel which cannot ship directly to GCC countries.

The firm has been trying to capitalise on Jordan’s stability and security compared to its neighbouring countries, trying to turn the situation into a stepping stone, not only for its agricultural produce, but also to attract others to establish themselves in the country and serve the area from Jordan.

Interest has been growing amongst European producers to expand in countries in the Middle East, like United Arab Emirates, and this is also the case for AgriJordan, which has been gaining market share in various destinations in the area, including UAE, Qatar, Kuwait and even Saudi Arabia, which had enforced prohibitions on Jordanian products for many years.

“We are finding that, despite the risks involved, the boom in the Gulf market provided Jordan with a great chance to explore new opportunities that are currently turning out to be quite lucrative for us,” concludes Mohammed Bataineh.

For more information:
Zahran Plaza, 7th circle
P.O. Box: 140825, Amman, 11814, Jordan
Tel: +962 6 5503245
agrijordan.com/welcome

Publication date: 4/29/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Ancient African cattle first domesticated in Middle East, study reveals

TGF-FruitImageGeneticist and anthropologists previously suspected that ancient Africans domesticated cattle native to the African continent nearly 10,000 years ago. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers has completed the genetic history of 134 cattle breeds from around the world. In the process of completing this history, they found that ancient domesticated African cattle originated in the “Fertile Crescent,” a region that covered modern day Iraq, Jordan, Syria and Israel.

Lead researcher Jared Decker, an assistant professor of animal science in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, says the genetics of these African cattle breeds are similar to those of cattle first domesticated in the Middle East nearly 10,000 years ago, proving that those cattle were brought to Africa as farmers migrated south. Those cattle then interbred with wild cattle, or aurochs, which were native to the region, and changed their genetic makeup enough to confuse geneticists.

In their study published in PLOS Genetics, Decker and a team of international researchers compared the similarities and differences among the genetics of many different cattle breeds to determine how the breeds are related. Their research found mixing of native cattle in Indonesia with imports from India, European and African cattle in Italy and Spain, and European and Asian cattle in Korea and Japan. The MU researchers also determined that unique American cattle breeds, such as Texas longhorns, are the result of breeding between Spanish cattle, transported from Europe by explorers in the 16th century, and breeds of Zebu, or Brahman cattle from India imported into the U.S. from Brazil in the late 1800s. Decker says these discoveries help advance genetics and uncover important information about human history.

“In many ways, the history of cattle genetics mirrors human history,” Decker said. “In the case of African cattle, anthropologists and geneticists used to suspect that domesticated African cattle were native to the continent, when in fact, they were brought by migrating peoples thousands of years ago. By better understanding the history of the animals we domesticate, we can better understand ourselves.”

Decker also said that cattle breeding is important for animal farmers looking to maximize their herds’ meat and dairy production. He says that understanding the genetic history of cattle breeds is important when looking for solutions to agricultural issues.

“Now that we have this more complete genetic history of cattle worldwide, we can better understand the diversity of the species,” Decker said. “By understanding the variations present, we can improve cattle for agricultural purposes, whether that is through breeding more disease-resistant animals or finding ways to increase dairy or beef production.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Australia: Significant rise in exports to Asia and Middle East

Ben O’Brien, Alfred E Chave
Australia: Significant rise in exports to Asia and Middle East

Alfred Edward Chave opened a fruit and vegetable stall at Brisbane’s busy Roma street market over 100 years ago, today the company has become one of Australia’s leading wholesale fruit and vegetable companies and works closely with some of Australia’s best growers ensuring the highest standards in quality and flavour.

Whilst Alfred E Chave has a long history of exporting fresh produce, recent years have seen significant growth in the export side of the business owing to enduring customer relationships, major investments in state of the art storage and packing facilities at their Brisbane base. Building an experienced operations team to handle the increased exports has been a focus of management.

As Ben O’Brien, International Trader at Alfred E Chave explains, fresh produce exports have increased significantly in the last three years. “We have invested heavily in building a sustainable export business that has allowed us to meet the growing demand from our customers across Asia, the Middle East and New Zealand. Consistency and quality of produce has been crucial to our success as it is highly valued by our customers.”

Alfred E Chave have built upon their domestic expertise in the handling and marketing of mangoes as a core focus for export markets by partnering with some of the finest mango growers in the Northern Territory and Queensland. Expectations ahead of this year’s mango season are very positive.

The company has enjoyed a twenty year relationship with the Jurgen family who grow Veejays tomatoes, one of Australia’s premier tomato brands.

The main exports are fruit – mango, grapes, mandarins, oranges and stone fruit which go to Asia Pacific, Dubai and New Zealand.

Ben explains that Dubai has been a great market for the business, despite a few years of financial turbulence in the region. “This market is on the increase again and is the hub for other Middle Eastern and North African countries. We have been fortunate in building strong relationships with the right customers. Vietnam, the Philippines and the rest of South East Asia are also growing markets for our business. We go to great lengths to understand the requirements of our international customers and then work closely with our growers to ensure that together we satisfy these customers and build value in the relationship.”

For more information:
Ben O’Brien
Alfred E. Chave
Tel: +61 408 450 420
Email: [email protected]
www.alfredechave.com.au

Publication date: 9/27/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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