Blog Archives

Fish integration: Nature adores a hybrid

Overfishing, climate change and pollution have reduced fish populations in Canadian lakes and rivers. While hatchery-raised fish could return numbers to normal, they aren’t as well adapted to their new environments, and there’s been concern that the wild population is “tainted” once it breeds with its domesticated counterparts.

But new research from Concordia, published in the journal Evolutionary Applications, shows that after a few generations of breeding and natural selection, these hybrid fish are genetically as robust as their purely wild forefathers.

Fishing for results

Under the leadership of biology professor Dylan Fraser, the research team — which included Concordia graduate student Andrew Harbicht and research scientist Chris Wilson from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry — headed to Algonquin Provincial Park, a fisherman’s paradise of lakes stocked generations ago with hatchery salmon and trout.

The team transplanted combinations of wild, domesticated and hybridized populations of Algonquin Park vbrook trout to new environments. The researchers then compared survival rates and physical characteristics to determine whether hybridization affects a fish’s potential to adapt after multiple generations of natural selection in the wild.

It turns out that within five to 11 generations of fish (about 25 to 50 years), the foreign genes introduced into wild populations through hybridization are removed by natural selection. That means fish populations previously bolstered by hatchery stock are, genetically speaking, indistinguishable from purely wild populations.

The implications for conservation

Fraser, himself an avid fisherman, says these results provide hope for wild populations that were initially negatively affected by human-induced hybridization.

“If we can stop the incoming flow of foreign genes while maintaining an environment similar to what was there pre-hybridization, wild populations are likely to recover — possibly in less time than previously thought,” he says.

And it looks like that’s true for more than just fish. Similar conclusions have recently been made about wolf species previously exposed to hybridization.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Concordia University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Fish integration: Nature adores a hybrid

Overfishing, climate change and pollution have reduced fish populations in Canadian lakes and rivers. While hatchery-raised fish could return numbers to normal, they aren’t as well adapted to their new environments, and there’s been concern that the wild population is “tainted” once it breeds with its domesticated counterparts.

But new research from Concordia, published in the journal Evolutionary Applications, shows that after a few generations of breeding and natural selection, these hybrid fish are genetically as robust as their purely wild forefathers.

Fishing for results

Under the leadership of biology professor Dylan Fraser, the research team — which included Concordia graduate student Andrew Harbicht and research scientist Chris Wilson from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry — headed to Algonquin Provincial Park, a fisherman’s paradise of lakes stocked generations ago with hatchery salmon and trout.

The team transplanted combinations of wild, domesticated and hybridized populations of Algonquin Park vbrook trout to new environments. The researchers then compared survival rates and physical characteristics to determine whether hybridization affects a fish’s potential to adapt after multiple generations of natural selection in the wild.

It turns out that within five to 11 generations of fish (about 25 to 50 years), the foreign genes introduced into wild populations through hybridization are removed by natural selection. That means fish populations previously bolstered by hatchery stock are, genetically speaking, indistinguishable from purely wild populations.

The implications for conservation

Fraser, himself an avid fisherman, says these results provide hope for wild populations that were initially negatively affected by human-induced hybridization.

“If we can stop the incoming flow of foreign genes while maintaining an environment similar to what was there pre-hybridization, wild populations are likely to recover — possibly in less time than previously thought,” he says.

And it looks like that’s true for more than just fish. Similar conclusions have recently been made about wolf species previously exposed to hybridization.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Concordia University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Getting more out of nature: Genetic toolkit finds new maximum for crop yields

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today announced a new way to dramatically increase crop yields by improving upon Mother Nature’s offerings. A team led by Associate Professor Zachary Lippman, in collaboration with Israeli colleagues, has discovered a set of gene variations that can boost fruit production in the tomato plant by as much as 100%.

Plant breeders will be able to combine different gene variants among the set to create an optimal plant architecture for particular varieties and growing conditions. The set of mutations will enable farmers to maximize yield in tomatoes and potentially many other flowering plants, including staple crops like soybeans.

“Traditionally, plant breeders have relied on natural variation in plant genes to increase yield, but yield gains are plateauing,” Lippman notes. “There is an immediate need to find new ways for plant breeders to produce more food.” Worldwide more than 842 million people do not receive adequate nourishment, about 1 person in 8 alive today. The cost of food is expected to increase and hunger is likely to become more widespread as the global population expands to beyond 9 billion by 2050.

Ancient humans and early plant breeders recognized that selecting plants with modified architectures could have a major impact on the amount of fruit they produce. In general scientific terms, Lippman explains, “Plant architecture results from a delicate balance between vegetative growth – shoots and leaves – and flower production. To increase crop yields, we want plants to produce as many flowers and fruits as possible, but this requires energy – energy that is produced in leaves.”

In tomatoes and all other flowering plants, the balance between vegetative growth and flowers is controlled by a pair of opposing hormones, called florigen and anti-florigen. Prior work by Lippman and Israeli colleagues showed that a mutation in florigen can shift the balance between vegetative growth and flowering, modifying plant architecture in a way that increases yield. This suggested that the balance between florigen and anti-florigen might not yet be optimal in tomato plants, despite centuries of breeding with natural variants.

In a study published in Nature Genetics, Lippman’s team identifies an array of new gene mutations that allow, for the first time, a way to fine-tune the balance of florigen to anti-florigen. This maximizes fruit production without compromising the energy from leaves needed to support those fruits. “We mixed and matched all of the mutations,” explains Lippman. “And we were able to produce plants with a broad range of architectures. Together, our collection of mutations forms a powerful toolkit for breeders to pinpoint a new optimum in flowering and architecture that can achieve previously unattainable yield gains.”

The breakthrough benefit of the toolkit, says Lippman, is that it allows farmers to customize genetic variations for particular varieties and growing conditions. “For example, we found that different combinations boost yields for cherry tomatoes and other fresh-market tomatoes compared to tomatoes that are processed for sauce, ketchup, and other canned products. We’ve tested this in multiple genetic backgrounds, in multiple years, and in multiple environments – and the toolkit always provides a new maximum yield.”

These results are likely to be broadly applicable to other flowering crops, Lippman says. Mutations that affect florigen and anti-florigen are already known to play a role in controlling plant architecture for the oil crops rapeseed and sunflower, and can be applied in those. But the team is anxious to move on to critical food crops, specifically soybeans, which share many growth similarities with tomato.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Chris Veillon to head marketing at Nature Fresh Farms

Nature Fresh Farms, a greenhouse vegetable grower located in Leamington, ON, announced that Chris Veillon will lead the company’s brand marketing efforts. With more than 17 years of senior marketing communications experience across a variety of industries, Veillon is a seasoned marketer with a proven track record of success.CHRIS VEILLON-Photo

“We are excited to add an experienced marketing professional like Chris to our expanding team at Nature Fresh Farms,” Peter Quiring, president of Nature Fresh Farms, said in a press release. “We have seen our business evolve considerably over the last few years, and in doing so we are putting more effort in to connecting with consumers via strategic marketing efforts.”

Long known as one of the leading greenhouse Bell pepper growers in North America, Nature Fresh also grows and markets an array of tomatoes, cucumbers, hot peppers and seasonal lettuce.

“I am very excited to be joining the Nature Fresh team and look forward to helping grow the company,” Veillon added in the press release.

Veillon will be based at the company’s headquarters office in Leamington.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Del Monte launches ‘Nature Made’ fresh-cut offerings, expands Dallas facility

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A. Inc. is expanding its extensive fresh cut fruit and vegetable product offerings to include complete meal single-serve salad bowls as well as fresh fruit and protein snack packs under the “Nature Made’ brand. The new products coincide with the expansion of operating facilities and production lines in Dallas and will also include new bagged single-serve Del Monte fresh cut fruit and vegetables.

Nature-Made-Single-Serve-SaThe salad bowl range, made with Del Monte fresh fruits and vegetables, will include the Nature Made Caesar Salad with White Chicken and Nature Made Turkey and Bacon Cobb Salad among others.

“We are excited to launch our newest product line that will include salads and snack packs,” Dennis Christou, vice president of marketing, North America for Del Monte, said in a press release. “Our focus is the on-the-go consumer seeking a convenient, healthy and complete meal. Our new product range makes it easy to eat healthy, with delicious and nutritious salads made with premium-quality ingredients complete with a fork, dressing, and even an after-meal breath mint. As one of the largest fresh-cut suppliers, extending our product line to include salads and snacks for the on-the-go consumer was a logical move.”

The new snack pack product range will include fresh fruit and protein combinations such as its Nature Made Turkey & Swiss Snack Pack, which includes red grapes, red apple slices, turkey slices, Swiss cheese and crackers.  They will also have the innovative Nature Made Turkey Sausage Links & Pancakes Pack that includes grapes, buttermilk pancakes, apples, turkey breakfast sausage and syrup.

In addition, Del Monte is also expanding its fresh-cut produce capabilities and providing a larger variety of fresh cut items and blends for their customers.  New state-of-the-art equipment has increased production and allows Del Monte to process bagged, single-serve, fresh-cut fruit and vegetables that are perfect for schools, traditional retailers, convenience stores and other foodservice venues.

These significant new product introductions were made possible by the expansion of Del Monte’s Dallas operations with an entirely new USDA-certified facility to process a broader variety of products. The new products will initially be available in the South Central and Midwest and there are plans for future expansion in other markets.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Del Monte launches ‘Nature Made’ fresh-cut offerings, expands Dallas facility

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A. Inc. is expanding its extensive fresh cut fruit and vegetable product offerings to include complete meal single-serve salad bowls as well as fresh fruit and protein snack packs under the “Nature Made’ brand. The new products coincide with the expansion of operating facilities and production lines in Dallas and will also include new bagged single-serve Del Monte fresh cut fruit and vegetables.

Nature-Made-Single-Serve-SaThe salad bowl range, made with Del Monte fresh fruits and vegetables, will include the Nature Made Caesar Salad with White Chicken and Nature Made Turkey and Bacon Cobb Salad among others.

“We are excited to launch our newest product line that will include salads and snack packs,” Dennis Christou, vice president of marketing, North America for Del Monte, said in a press release. “Our focus is the on-the-go consumer seeking a convenient, healthy and complete meal. Our new product range makes it easy to eat healthy, with delicious and nutritious salads made with premium-quality ingredients complete with a fork, dressing, and even an after-meal breath mint. As one of the largest fresh-cut suppliers, extending our product line to include salads and snacks for the on-the-go consumer was a logical move.”

The new snack pack product range will include fresh fruit and protein combinations such as its Nature Made Turkey & Swiss Snack Pack, which includes red grapes, red apple slices, turkey slices, Swiss cheese and crackers.  They will also have the innovative Nature Made Turkey Sausage Links & Pancakes Pack that includes grapes, buttermilk pancakes, apples, turkey breakfast sausage and syrup.

In addition, Del Monte is also expanding its fresh-cut produce capabilities and providing a larger variety of fresh cut items and blends for their customers.  New state-of-the-art equipment has increased production and allows Del Monte to process bagged, single-serve, fresh-cut fruit and vegetables that are perfect for schools, traditional retailers, convenience stores and other foodservice venues.

These significant new product introductions were made possible by the expansion of Del Monte’s Dallas operations with an entirely new USDA-certified facility to process a broader variety of products. The new products will initially be available in the South Central and Midwest and there are plans for future expansion in other markets.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Del Monte launches ‘Nature Made’ fresh-cut offerings, expands Dallas facility

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A. Inc. is expanding its extensive fresh cut fruit and vegetable product offerings to include complete meal single-serve salad bowls as well as fresh fruit and protein snack packs under the “Nature Made’ brand. The new products coincide with the expansion of operating facilities and production lines in Dallas and will also include new bagged single-serve Del Monte fresh cut fruit and vegetables.

Nature-Made-Single-Serve-SaThe salad bowl range, made with Del Monte fresh fruits and vegetables, will include the Nature Made Caesar Salad with White Chicken and Nature Made Turkey and Bacon Cobb Salad among others.

“We are excited to launch our newest product line that will include salads and snack packs,” Dennis Christou, vice president of marketing, North America for Del Monte, said in a press release. “Our focus is the on-the-go consumer seeking a convenient, healthy and complete meal. Our new product range makes it easy to eat healthy, with delicious and nutritious salads made with premium-quality ingredients complete with a fork, dressing, and even an after-meal breath mint. As one of the largest fresh-cut suppliers, extending our product line to include salads and snacks for the on-the-go consumer was a logical move.”

The new snack pack product range will include fresh fruit and protein combinations such as its Nature Made Turkey & Swiss Snack Pack, which includes red grapes, red apple slices, turkey slices, Swiss cheese and crackers.  They will also have the innovative Nature Made Turkey Sausage Links & Pancakes Pack that includes grapes, buttermilk pancakes, apples, turkey breakfast sausage and syrup.

In addition, Del Monte is also expanding its fresh-cut produce capabilities and providing a larger variety of fresh cut items and blends for their customers.  New state-of-the-art equipment has increased production and allows Del Monte to process bagged, single-serve, fresh-cut fruit and vegetables that are perfect for schools, traditional retailers, convenience stores and other foodservice venues.

These significant new product introductions were made possible by the expansion of Del Monte’s Dallas operations with an entirely new USDA-certified facility to process a broader variety of products. The new products will initially be available in the South Central and Midwest and there are plans for future expansion in other markets.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Nature Fresh offers wide range of hot peppers

Nature Fresh offers wide range of hot peppers

Nature Fresh Farms is turning up the heat with many of the hottest speciality peppers, intended to add the right level of zest to any recipe. The range includes peppers varying in pungency in accordance with the Scoville scale, which measures the capsaicin content of chilli peppers and other spicy foods, from the Trinidad Scorpion, the spiciest with 1.4 million units, to the Padron/Shishito, the mildest with just between 500 and 1,000 units.

Some other varieties supplied by the company include the Poblano, Japapeño, Spanish Chilli, Pencil Hot, Habanero, Scotch Bonnet and Ghost.

All hot peppers are available from April to November in various formats, such as bulk packs of 3 and 5 lbs for those who would like to use their own packaging, but also retail ready clamshells or tray packs. Popular mixed packs are also available.

For more information:
Ray Wowryk
Nature Fresh
Tel: +1 519.326.1111 x1377
Fax: +1 519.326.2070
Email: [email protected]
www.naturefresh.ca

Publication date: 5/28/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Wild by Nature to replace closed King Kullen

King Kullen Grocery Co. said it would open its natural/organic banner Wild by Nature later this year at a site previously occupied by its King Kullen conventional store.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


The 22,000-square-foot store in West Islip, N.Y., is expected to open in late summer or early fall, King Kullen said. It would be the fifth in the chain. The store will occupy a portion of the building occupied by a larger King Kullen store the company closed last month.

“We are very excited to be opening our first south shore location in mid-Suffolk County,” Wild by Nature co-president Joseph Brown said. “We’ve had many requests for a store in the area and we feel this location will be ideal. West Islip residents and their neighbors in the surrounding communities will be able to enjoy the same fresh, healthy foods and environmentally sound products as shoppers at our other four locations.”

The proposed West Islip location will include a produce center featuring organic fruits and vegetables; a complete selection of meats and poultry; a deli and appetizers department; a wok station; fresh-caught seafood; sushi; a full-service bakery with fresh baked breads; a wide array of groceries; a café with a juice and smoothie bar; an extensive all-natural nutrition and supplement department; health and beauty care products; and a large selection of gluten-free foods.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News