Blog Archives

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Hans Maagendans, Banafood:
Netherlands: “The only winner in the banana price war is the consumer”

Seven years ago, boasting ample experience in the banana sector, Banafood Services started a new banana ripening facility, just across the border in the German town of Straelen. The facility has a capacity of 35,000 boxes per week and the opportunity to expand rapidly. 

According to owner Hans Maagendans, the strength of Banafood is that the company relieves both the retailer and the importer. “For supermarkets, we take care of the entire chain. We ensure that the product is delivered in the right colour, temperature and shelf-life through a tight inventory management system. We do everything we can to deliver the bananas in good condition, but the last couple of steps can make or break the process. To get it right, we pay visits to the shop floor and give advice on how to display the items.”

The customer base consists mainly of Dutch supermarkets supplemented with retailers and wholesalers from Germany. “We basically ripen all brands. We also started maturing other exotics such as mangoes and avocados. For a number of cells, we have adapted the software.”

Declining consumption 

Nielsen figures show that the Dutch purchase of bananas per household has been declining slightly over the last three years. “That’s worrisome. I think it has to do with changing eating habits. Also, exotics like mangoes are offered at competitive prices, and the sale of convenience products is gaining ground,” says Hans. Niche products, however, have yet to emerge. “I don’t see the so-called baby bananas turning into a huge market anytime soon.”


Price wars

“I prefer not to use the word banana war, as I think the term conjures up different connotations,” says Hans, “but yes, the fierce competition is affecting everyone in the sector. The price fixes introduced last year have had a huge impact on free-market trading. The first six months of the year are generally a good time for bananas; they’re sold at a good price. So if a supermarket still offers them for 99 cents, it offsets the market tremendously.”

“For Fairtrade bananas and the organic banana market it’s a blow as well. The only ones to remain relatively unaffected are discounters, but mid-level retailers aren’t able to keep up. In Germany, bananas are sold for a price between 1.49 and 1.79 Euro per kilo. Those are normal selling prices. But over here, things are crazy. Nobody is making any money. The only winner is the consumer.”

www.banafood.eu/ 

Publication date: 5/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

Photo report of conference and a lecture from Cindy van Rijswick (Rabobank)
The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

In partnership with Frugi Venta, the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) set foot on European soil for the first time this year to organise a conference in Rotterdam under the title PMA’s Fresh Connections. Around a hundred interested professionals from the fresh produce sector attended yesterday the event at the Hilton Hotel, with keynote speakers such as Jose Antonio Gomez (Camposol), Boet Mouton (Mouton Citrus), Andrew Reynolds (Total Produce), Elliott Grant (Harvest Mark), Gé Happe (Ahold), Oleen Smethurst (Costco) and Cindy Van Rijswick (Rabobank). Today, the company will arrange a tour including visits to Red Star, Koppert Cress and Wageningen University.

Van Rijswick, Fresh Produce Analyst at Rabobank, kicked off the event with an introduction to Europe’s place in the global trade of fruit and vegetables. She highlighted innovation as the main engine for economic growth in Europe, pointing out that, particularly in emerging countries, the gap in terms of innovation seems to be narrowing. She pointed out that further innovation is needed to reactivate the consumption of fruits and vegetables with stagnant sales; however, the analyst also said to be optimistic about the long term future for the sector, partly due to the growth of convenience products, the focus on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and the greater weight given by professional chefs to vegetables on their menus.

Click here for the photo report

Van Rijswick stated that consumers are difficult to classify into groups. “One and the same person may be a one-time buyer of cheap products at Lidl, but also of an expensive salad another time. Lidl, for example, is doing well in the sale of fruits and vegetables at low prices, but there is also a strong growth in products with higher added value, such as fruit salads. Over the past five years, the fresh-cut market has experienced an annual growth of around 10% (4% in Germany and 7% in the UK, despite the economic crisis. Processed vegetables have also grown by 4% in volume (2.7% in UK and 11% in Germany).”

This growth, according to Cindy, is taking place especially in online, discount and convenience. “Online food trade will double in the coming years and this will have an impact on fruit and vegetable traders.” She also talked about the returns of greenhouse vegetable growers; currently well under pressure, and about the changes in trade flows, which complicate the sourcing. “The fruit and vegetable exporting countries growing the most are mostly outside Western Europe, although in absolute terms, Europe is still a great place for trade. The largest exporter of fresh fruits and vegetables is still Spain, followed by Mexico, Chile, China, Turkey and the Netherlands. In terms of import volumes, Germany tops the list, followed by Russia, Japan, France, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States.”

In conclusion, Western Europe is not the market growing the most, but it remains a large and attractive market. Growth in Europe is only possible through innovation in logistics and efficiency in the value chain and in retail and consumer solutions. Outside Europe, the main growth opportunities for Western European fruit producers lie in the local production and marketing of knowledge-intensive products and in the development of export platforms in producing countries for the worldwide delivery of specific European products.

Later this week there will be reports of other conferences.

Click here for the photo report

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

Photo report of conference and a lecture from Cindy van Rijswick (Rabobank)
The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

In partnership with Frugi Venta, the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) set foot on European soil for the first time this year to organise a conference in Rotterdam under the title PMA’s Fresh Connections. Around a hundred interested professionals from the fresh produce sector attended yesterday the event at the Hilton Hotel, with keynote speakers such as Jose Antonio Gomez (Camposol), Boet Mouton (Mouton Citrus), Andrew Reynolds (Total Produce), Elliott Grant (Harvest Mark), Gé Happe (Ahold), Oleen Smethurst (Costco) and Cindy Van Rijswick (Rabobank). Today, the company will arrange a tour including visits to Red Star, Koppert Cress and Wageningen University.

Van Rijswick, Fresh Produce Analyst at Rabobank, kicked off the event with an introduction to Europe’s place in the global trade of fruit and vegetables. She highlighted innovation as the main engine for economic growth in Europe, pointing out that, particularly in emerging countries, the gap in terms of innovation seems to be narrowing. She pointed out that further innovation is needed to reactivate the consumption of fruits and vegetables with stagnant sales; however, the analyst also said to be optimistic about the long term future for the sector, partly due to the growth of convenience products, the focus on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and the greater weight given by professional chefs to vegetables on their menus.

Click here for the photo report

Van Rijswick stated that consumers are difficult to classify into groups. “One and the same person may be a one-time buyer of cheap products at Lidl, but also of an expensive salad another time. Lidl, for example, is doing well in the sale of fruits and vegetables at low prices, but there is also a strong growth in products with higher added value, such as fruit salads. Over the past five years, the fresh-cut market has experienced an annual growth of around 10% (4% in Germany and 7% in the UK, despite the economic crisis. Processed vegetables have also grown by 4% in volume (2.7% in UK and 11% in Germany).”

This growth, according to Cindy, is taking place especially in online, discount and convenience. “Online food trade will double in the coming years and this will have an impact on fruit and vegetable traders.” She also talked about the returns of greenhouse vegetable growers; currently well under pressure, and about the changes in trade flows, which complicate the sourcing. “The fruit and vegetable exporting countries growing the most are mostly outside Western Europe, although in absolute terms, Europe is still a great place for trade. The largest exporter of fresh fruits and vegetables is still Spain, followed by Mexico, Chile, China, Turkey and the Netherlands. In terms of import volumes, Germany tops the list, followed by Russia, Japan, France, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States.”

In conclusion, Western Europe is not the market growing the most, but it remains a large and attractive market. Growth in Europe is only possible through innovation in logistics and efficiency in the value chain and in retail and consumer solutions. Outside Europe, the main growth opportunities for Western European fruit producers lie in the local production and marketing of knowledge-intensive products and in the development of export platforms in producing countries for the worldwide delivery of specific European products.

Later this week there will be reports of other conferences.

Click here for the photo report

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Peru: Avocado exports to Spain and the Netherlands will amount to 140,000 tons in 2014

Peru: Avocado exports to Spain and the Netherlands will amount to 140,000 tons in 2014

According to Prohass, this year, Hass avocado exports of avocado would amount to 140,000 tonnes, 40 percent more than in 2013′s March to September export season.

This growth would be driven by higher shipments to Europe, as there have already been first shipments to this destination, said Arturo Medina, Prohass’ CEO.

“Normally, Spain and the Netherlands are the main importers of Peruvian Hass avocado in the statistics, but we must take into account that the Netherlands re-exported almost 90 percent of this product, and Spain about 50 percent,” he said.

However, he stressed other positive aspects such as the yearly increase in consumption of Peruvian avocado in Germany.

Regarding the amendment of the Work Plan for the export of the product, Medina explained that it wouldn’t apply only to the U.S. but to all destinations.

“One of the most important points is that the SENASA will check that all the Hass avocados to be exported have a minimum of 21.5 percent dry matter for all export destinations,” he added.

He also ensured that the 2014 procedures included the regions of Piura and Lambayeque as SENASA had authorized them to export avocados to the United States, and that the maximum tolerance of no-quarantine pests for export to the United States and Chile would be at 4 percent.

Finally, he said it was difficult to know, at present, how these markets would behave, as the campaign (March-September 2014) was just the beginning. “All we have to do is to send a product of very good quality and a suitable dry matter if we want to maintain the worldwide good reputation of the Peruvian Hass avocado,” he said.

Source: andina.com.pe

Publication date: 3/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spanish strawberries losing market share in the Netherlands and Belgium

José Beltrán, of Hispalco. “The export campaign kicks off with a lively market and good prices.”
Spanish strawberries losing market share in the Netherlands and Belgium

According to José Beltrán, manager of the exporting company Hispalco, the weather conditions were not ideal during the previous strawberry campaign and this had a notable impact on the fruit’s production volumes and quality. “This reflected on the bad prices registered during almost the entire campaign, which only started improving by the end, when milder temperatures allowed for an improvement in the fruit’s quality.”

For this year’s campaign, which is only just starting, “the markets so far are responding well in terms of prices. Furthermore, supply and demand are balanced”, he explains.

Premium Hispalco strawberries, sold under the brands Monna Lisa© and Unicorn©, are reaching approximately 3.80 Euro per box and around 1.20 Euro per 250 gram container of the Fortuna variety. The firm will then continue with the Splendor, Candonga and Sabrina varieties and finish the campaign with the Camarosa.

The main destinations for these strawberries are Central European countries, “although we also have large clients in other countries, like the United States or Canada,” affirms Beltrán. “The Russian market and the United Arab Emirates are markets where we are now starting to consolidate.”

The Netherlands and Belgium increasingly preferring to consume their own produce
It is becoming more and more difficult to export Spanish strawberries to the Netherlands and Belgium at the same price levels as a few years ago. These countries have considerably increased their own production volumes; a growing trend which will continue, as greenhouse growers discovered how profitable the crop is. Consequently, many have switched from vegetables to strawberries, which can be produced all year round.

“While production volumes in these countries were low, we were not affected, but now they are managing to cover their own domestic demand. There are importers who prefer to pay more for Belgian and Dutch strawberries, as even though they are not as tasty as Spanish strawberries, they have a longer shelf life. This is a handicap for us, as we often need to lower our prices to be able to sell.”

Regarding the impact of competition from other producers, like Egypt or Morocco, the difference lies heavily in that “their quality and presentation are at a lower standard. Israeli strawberries can compete with Spain’s in terms of quality; however, if Spanish strawberries have been produced with care, they will have the advantage.”



New campaign, new packaging formats

“Within the strawberry sector, we are meant to keep up to date with the new packaging formats launched almost every season. Our brands Monna Lisa© and Unicorn© are always very well presented, and although we don’t invent anything, we keep incorporating new formats. This season we have introduced the K-60 container, in 400 and 500 gram formats; the F-500 container for 500 grams, and a compact recycled cardboard box, to be used with our organic strawberries, with a capacity of 1 kilo.”

Fruit Logistica, the place to showcase its slogan QUALITY IS IN OUR DNA
“Hispalco has attended Fruit Logistica for the past 5 years, always surpassing everyone’s expectations in terms of the stand’s presentation, its commitment to satisfy its clients and suppliers and in the quality of the products presented. For this reason, our slogan remains unchanged: QUALITY IS IN OUR DNA.”

“This year we will introduce our CLASSIC EDITION under the Monna Lisa©, Unicorn© and Hispalco®Bio brands: a vintage presentation for oranges and clementines intended to be sold by retailers and which will be available all year round.”

Hispalco S.A. is a family business which “has been growing steadily year after year and has plenty of potential to continue doing so in the future,” affirms its manager. All Hispalco team members “has an entrepreneurial spirit, and that is at the core of our company’s values.”

Hispalco will welcome all visitors at Hall 11.2, stand B-08 of Fruit Logistica 2014, in Messe Berlin, from 5 to 7 February.

For more information:
Ana Beltrán
HISPALCO, S.A.
C/ Barranco Pascual, 45. Pol. Ind. Campo Aníbal.
46530 Puzol, Valencia. Spain.
T: +34 963404422
M: +34606686319
[email protected]
www.hispalco.com

Publication date: 1/27/2014


FreshPlaza.com

The Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importers

TGF-FruitImageThe Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importersIn the period between 2009 and 2012, the Netherlands became the largest worldwide exporter and re-exporter of fruit and vegetables (including citrus), according to data provided by the Statistics Division of the United Nations.

Taking 2012′s exports and re-exports into account, the Netherlands handled 14.6% of the world’s total, followed by Spain, with 12.1%, and China, with 10.9%.

The fourth place in the ranking was for Mexico (9.7%), followed by the United States (8.3%), Canada (5%), France (4.4%), Belgium (3.7%), Italy (2.8%) and Germany, with 1.9%. The remaining 26.5% is distributed between other countries.


Clients

If we take a close look at these exporters’ main clients, the Netherlands covers 34.9% of Germany’s imports, 15.7% of the United Kingdom’s, 7.6% of Belgium’s, 3.8% of Sweden’s and 3.6% of France’s. Only 1.4% of its exports are shipped to Spain.

For its part, Spain covers 24.4% of Germany’s fruit and vegetable needs, while 16.8% is exported to France, 15.8% to the United Kingdom, 11.9% to the Netherlands and 5.4% to Italy.Meanwhile, China covers 17.8% of Japan’s fruit and vegetable imports, 8% of Indonesia’s, 7.2% of Vietnam’s, 6.8% of Malaysia’s and 6.6% of South Korea’s. Only 0.6% of its horticultural exports are shipped to Spain.

Mexico supplies 92.9% of the United State’s horticultural imports, 2% of Canada’s, 0.9% of Guatemala’s, 0.7% of Algeria’s, 0.6% of Turkey’s and around 0.5% of Spain’s.Finally, the United States covers 66.2% of Canada’s horticultural imports, 7.1% of Japan’s, 7.1% of Mexico’s, 2.6% of the United Kingdom’s and 0.7% of Spain fruit and vegetable imports, including citrus.

Source: hortoinfo

Publication date: 1/10/2014

 

FreshPlaza.com

Fifth find of CBS on South African citrus in The Netherlands

No imports stop as yet
Fifth find of CBS on South African citrus in The Netherlands

What citrus exporters have long feared, now seems to have come true. In the Netherlands, the fifth case of black spot in South African oranges has been found. Earlier, the EU threatened an import ban by the discovery of five cases. The ball is therefore now in the court of the European Commission, which has to decide what to do. According to Dutch importers shipments are still coming in as usual.

The consequences are not to be underestimated. Dutch citrus importers have said that it is especially strange to find that the black spot has only been found in the Netherlands. “Everything indicates that the black spot has also been found in other countries, but those countries do not report it. We are the best pupil in the class and the danger is that exporters may want to avoid The Netherlands when unloading. That would be a hard blow to produce companies.

Press officer from the NVWA, (Dutch food agency), Tjitte Mastenbroek said that it was the decision of the European Commission whether or not to declare an import ban. The situation at the moment is that no special measures are in place. When and if these measures have to be taken, we will monitor the situation and give the relevant information, but just now that is not an issue.

Both South Africa and Brazil should get an export ban if five cases are found. Interestingly, the counter in the Argentine citrus is already on seventeen finds. However, they may continue to export.

Author: Izak Heijboer

Publication date: 8/27/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

The Watercress Company to visit The Netherlands

23 – 28 September
The Watercress Company to visit The Netherlands

The Watercress Company with 65 ha globally, is the biggest watercress producer in the UK. The company has built the market supply as demand has increased. The market penetration in the UK has increased by double digits since 2002 and frequency of purchase has increased by 30%. The time has now come to expand the European side of the business.

Tom Amery, Managing Director at The Watercress Company, is confident that ensuring you have a reliable availability is fundamental to opening a new market and also educating the consumer to the benefits of the product. “Maintaining availability and quality throughout the year is also essential. Provenance is often discussed and although very important it’s a fact our strongest sales are during the months of 100% import into the UK.”

Amery will be visiting The Netherlands in week 39, (23- 28 Sept) and meeting a series of businesses interested in pursuing fresh watercress sales. At the moment he expects this to be mainly driven by salad packers, but it’s very likely he will be meeting other areas of industry as the company are also suppliers of nutriceutical watercress powders, and also produce Wasabi which is already exported to The Netherlands. 

“We are looking for businesses wanting to get involved in a unique growing product that has achieved proven performance within Europe. We would like to offer our time to discuss potential opportunities within The Netherlands.

Amery explains how The Watercress Company have contributed to the increased demand for watercress in the UK market, “I would say the fundamental selling point of watercress is the health attributes and flavour, fortunately watercress is brimming with nutritional benefits as well as some very well researched compounds that make it such a healthy product.”

“Availability and quality were two very key parts to launching our watercress campaign. Awareness and marketing is only relevant once there is a supply structure in place. All UK supermarkets stock at least one format of watercress and have given their full support to promotion. The Watercress Alliance was formed in 2002 as a group of watercress farmers who jointly invest capital into marketing and research; this has aided a resurgence, understanding and interest in watercress leading to several successful marketing campaigns and continued growth year on year.”

Watercress has also received good media coverage in the UK, Amery says that due to the unique way their products are grown, the historic farms and passionate growers, they have been lucky enough to attract a huge amount of coverage on television, radio and in print media.

“Our history, provenance and quality of crop has driven interest in our business. Providing topical stories regarding production, farming history and health benefits have kept the PR interest alive since we started. We have been part of an industry project and completed some very significant clinical research into the health benefits of watercress and this combined with the PR attention we have experienced significant increases in sales.”


 
The Watercress Company now produce over 2.5m kg of watercress per year. The splits are heavily in favour of packed bagged of salads in solo and mixed lines. Six supermarket chains buy watercress from the company and the rest of the sales are through sandwich and ready-meal manufacturers, foodservice customers, and the finally some bespoke lines such as frozen products, dried powders or ice cream.

“We have expanded our supply and tailored our specifications to provide crops specific to our customer’s bespoke, and often exacting, standards. We now grow varieties for supermarket mono or mixed bags, small and soft eating for sandwiches,  left long for bunching, specific grades for processing, organic and non-organic and a red watercress variety,” explains Amery.

If you are interested in meeting Tom Amery while he is in the Netherlands contact his office on +44 1929 401400 or [email protected].

www.thewatercresscompany.co.uk
 

Publication date: 8/26/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: Westland Peppers introduces seedless mini peppers

Netherlands: Westland Peppers introduces seedless mini peppers

Westland Peppers has recently launched a new pepper on the market: the Tasty Pep. The special feature of this orange mini pepper is that it is completely seedless. Propagation takes place by means of cuttings.


Co-owner Pieter Boekestijn revealed that the company has been engaged in developing new varieties for years. According to Boekestijn, development of the Tasty Pep has been serendipitous. The company now has the exclusive rights for Europe.

The Tasty Pep does not differ all that much from a ‘normal’ mini pepper. The biggest difference is that it’s seedless and that it is slightly smaller in shape. The new snack pepper is available in various packages and is also grown in Spain. “We are working together with growers in Spain that cultivate exclusively for us. They do the growing and we have the knowledge and do the marketing.”

Publication date: 8/15/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Netherlands: Staay Food Group acquires Van Rijn Trading

Poeldijk activities will be integrated with Barendrecht; Langfruit with Staay Venlo
Netherlands: Staay Food Group acquires Van Rijn Trading

Last Friday, Van Rijn Trading obtained a suspension of payments, Mr. M. Souren of Hoens & Souren was appointed as administrator.

The company has since halted trading. The management of Van Rijn, together with the administrator have been trying to find a solution.
Yesterday, August 14, an oral agreement was made with Staay Food Group to take over the activities – after bankruptcy – of Van Rijn Trading BV. The commercial operation of the facility in Poeldijk will be integrated with the activities of Staay-Hispa BV in Barendrecht. The activities of the former Langfruit will be integrated with those of Van der Staay Venlo BV. The name Van der Staay Venlo BV will be changed to Staay-Van Rijn BV, a 100% subsidiary of Staay Food Group. For this company the normal credit limits will be provided to enable business to go head.

This acquisition means many jobs will be preserved. 

Publication date: 8/15/2013


FreshPlaza.com