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NZ: KVH looks at new “Far North” exclusion zone Psa protection

The board of Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has said it will consider a proposal for a new “Far North” exclusion region that could potentially form part of its National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP).

In a release last Thursday, KVH said it would discuss the matter this week.

“This proposal was requested by an industry body operating in the far north area and follows consultation with local interested parties,” the group said in a release.

“The proposed new region would extend from Ahipara on the West coast across to Taipa in on the East coast and up to Cape Reinga.”

The proposal looks to establish a high level of protection for new commercial growing areas where new commercial orchards are starting to be established, as well as for other areas of importance to the industry such as sites that supply plant material that is free of the disease Psa.

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FreshFruitPortal.com

North Bay Produce partners with the Produce Mom

The Produce Mom announced the addition of North Bay Produce Inc. to her family of trusted partners. North Bay offers its customers a year-round supply of a variety of fresh produce, thanks to its network of domestic and Latin American growers.The-Produce-Mom-North-Bay-Produce-Infographic

“There’s so much culture represented in this company,” Lori Taylor, The Produce Mom, said in a press release. “Together we will raise consumer confidence and understanding of import produce.”

“Fresh from the Farm, Year Around” is more than a slogan to North Bay. The company currently offers customers a year-round supply of apples, asparagus, blackberries, snow peas, sugar snap peas and blueberries, one of North Bay’s signature items.

The company’s ready-to-eat blueberry snack packs were featured during one of The Produce Mom’s Indy Style segments this summer. North Bay supplies customers with blueberries from its domestic growers spring through fall, then imports fresh blueberries from its Latin American growers during the winter months. Raspberries are offered seasonally, September through June.

“North Bay Produce is committed to providing the world with an uninterrupted supply of high-quality produce,” Sharon Robb, national marketing manager for North Bay, said in the press release. “Partnering with The Produce Mom will allow us to better educate consumers on the year-round freshness, availability and safety of produce.”

The “Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools” initiative, a public health campaign to increase salad bars in schools across the country, is another common goal for the two companies. Mark Girardin, President of North Bay Produce, is a Midwest campaign co-chair for the initiative and serves as a captain for the state of Michigan. Taylor takes every opportunity to promote the initiative, whether it’s on her Indy Style morning show segment, her blog or at a speaking engagement such as The Indiana School Nutrition Association Conference.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Photo report State Farmers Market Raleigh, North Carolina

4.8 million visitors a year
Photo report State Farmers Market Raleigh, North Carolina

The Farmers Market still plays a prominent role in the United States. Last week I visited the State Farmers Market of Raleigh, the largest in the state of North Carolina. The Farmers Market in Raleigh has a consumer and a wholesale section. In 2013, the market was visited by 4.8 million people. The market is open seven days a week. You could find 30,000 people walking around the Farmers Market on any given Saturday. Restaurants and retailers buy there, but many families and schools also treat a visit to the Farmers Market as a day out.

Click here for the photo report


The consumer market only has farmers from North Carolina. Farmers rent a unit per day or week. Others (twelve out of a hundred) are there year-round. Remarkably, nearly all farmers have a wide range of products, often with one main product. The market’s organizers try to maintain a balance in the products on offer. For instance, there’s a waiting list for growers of pumpkins, strawberries and Christmas trees. The wholesalers at the Farmers Market also offer a wide range of imported fruit. Special events are held, such as a ‘Pumpkin Night’ and ‘Strawberry Day’.



Owner Ronnie Yokeley of R&H Produce is one of the wholesalers at the market. Potatoes, apples and oranges are his main products, but he also imports bananas, pineapple, melons, grapes and stonefruit


Click here for the photo report

There was a particularly large supply of local new-crop sweet potatoes, pumpkins and apples. In addition, there was a wide range of local fruit and open field vegetables. For instance, you see a lot of Collards (marrow-stem kale), a product that you don’t see at all in the Netherlands. Unlike retailers in the area, the supply of organic produce at the market was very limited. One of the reasons for this was, according to the manager of the market, that the farmers at the market represent a significant acreage, and not many organic farmers have this kind of capacity.


This Farmers Market has been in existence since 1955, and is managed by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. All in all, the market has an area of 30 hectares, a large part of which is indoors. In restaurants at the Farmers Market, products from the market are served. Opening hours are from Monday until Saturday from 5 am until 8 pm, and on Sunday between 8 am and 6 pm.



Click here for the photo report

For more information:
State Farmers Market
1201 Agriculture Street
Raleigh (North Carolina) 27603
Tel: 919-733-7414
Fax: 919-733-9932
www.statefarmersmarket.org

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Izak Heijboer
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Family Fare expands in North Dakota

SpartanNash on Monday said it would hold ribbon-cutting ceremonies at three North Dakota sites this week where it has rebranded SunMart stores to its Family Fare banner.

The stores — two in Fargo and one in Moorhead — are former SunMart sites into which SpartanNash invested $ 5 million in renovations.


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Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


The conversions follow similar rebannerings earlier this year in West Fargo and Dickinsion, N.D., resulting from last year’s merger of Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Spartan Stores and Minneapolis wholesaler Nash Finch. SunMart was Nash Finch’s former banner.

The three new stores have opening ceremonies planned for Thursday.

Ted Adornato, SpartanNash EVP of retail operations, oversaw the stores’ redevelopment.



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North Carolina Firm Recalls Nearly 150 Food Products for Potential Listeria Contamination

SunBurst Foods of Goldsboro, NC, is recalling numerous food products sold under several brands because of the potential of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes. The recall includes the food services firm’s SunBurst, Fresh Bites and Private labeled products, which were sold in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia.

This recall was initiated as a result of sampling and testing performed by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
The recalled products include sandwiches, hamburgers, chili dogs, salads and a long list of other items, which can be found here.

All codes, all sell-by dates and sizes of SunBurst and Fresh Bites brands are being recalled. Products not manufactured but distributed by SunBurst such as cakes, burritos, and chips are not part of this recall.

Private label products are identified by the following brand names: River Edge Farms, CFW, Southern Zest, CJ’s Vending, Binford Street Deli, Middle Georgia Vendors, Roanoke Foods, Select Foods, and Jesse Jones (Double Chili Dogs).

Consumers who have purchased the affected products are urged to destroy them or return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. EDT at 1-919-778-2151.

Listeria cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. To date, SunBurst is unaware of any illnesses related to these products.

Food Safety News