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Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US: Northwest apple farmers scramble to save last of their fruit

US: Northwest apple farmers scramble to save last of their fruit

An Arctic air mass has swept into the Northwest. Cold air and snow are expected from central Washington through central Oregon and even into Idaho’s central Panhandle.

Workers at Broetje Orchards in southeast Washington pulled some midnight shifts lately to try and save the last of the apples from the recent Arctic air.

That means farmers in the region are rushing to harvest the last of their apples before the fruit freezes.

In southeast Washington, Joe Shelton manages one of the world’s largest fruit orchards. He said few things are colder than a picking bag full of 30 pounds of 30-degree fruit strapped close to your body.

This week, Shelton has been running crews until midnight trying to save the last of the orchard’s Fujis and Braeburns. All together, Shelton said about 30,000 boxes of apples will probably rot on the trees.

“It’s hard, everyone is kind of deflated, ‘cause we’ve all worked so hard,” Shelton said. “Even all the guys that we have out there picking, it’s like a week shorter of harvest, they could have made another week’s wages. You just hate to see them hanging out there and going to nothing.”

Once apples freeze, they can’t go to the fresh market. And Shelton said juice prices are so low this year it doesn’t pay to pick them.

Source: boisestatepublicradio.org

Publication date: 11/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Northwest pear production drops slightly in 2012

Northwest pear production drops slightly in 2012

Although Summer pear production in the Pacific Northwest increased in 2012 when compared to the previous season, a drop in production for Winter pears meant a slight decrease for overall pear production in 2012. With less production, prices were higher than those from the previous season.

Summer pear production rose from 2011′s total of 4.2 million boxes to 4.4 million boxes in 2012. Though Red Bartlett production was 16 percent less than the five-year average for the area, the totals for Green Bartletts and Starkrimson pears were more than their respective five-year averages. The boost from Summer varieties, however, wasn’t enough to buoy the region’s overall pear numbers for 2012.

Total Winter pear production for the Pacific Northwest reached 14.9 million boxes in 2012. That’s down from 2011′s total of 16.3 million boxes, though 2012′s production was still higher than the region’s five-year average of 14.7 million boxes. Anjou and Bosc pears, the most prevalent Winter varieties, were less numerous in 2012, and that contributed to the overall decline in production when compared to the 2011 season. Total production for 2012 was 19.3 million boxes, which was down from the previous season’s total of 20.6 million boxes.

Publication date: 6/25/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mather leaving post at Pear Bureau Northwest

Cristie Mather is leaving her post as communications director at Pear Bureau Northwest, based in Portland, OR, to take the role of managing director at The Fiction Tribe, a creative agency with offices in Portland and Santa Clara, CA.

Mather has led the marketing communications programs for Pear Bureau Northwest since 2006. During her eight-year tenure, she directed numerous successful public relations, marketing and advertising activities targeting trade and consumer audiences. Her work with Pear Bureau Northwest has won awards from the National Agri-Marketing Association and the PR Society of America.MarketingOverviewCristie Mather

In 2012, she participated as a fellow in the United Fresh Produce Association’s Leadership Program sponsored by DuPont. She holds a seat on the marketing and merchandising committees for United Fresh Produce Association and the Canadian Produce Marketing Association, and has also volunteered her time with the Produce for Better Health Foundation, the International Foodservice Editorial Council and the U.S Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate national communications committee.

“When I considered my future, it was important for me to continue to make contributions to the produce industry,” Mather said in a press release. “I am dedicated to the overarching mission of increasing produce consumption, and I will continue to give back to the industry that has given me so much. With its current client roster, The Fiction Tribe is allied with the produce industry, and I look forward to helping more organizations achieve their marketing goals in my new role.”

The Fiction Tribe has partnered with Pear Bureau Northwest in several projects over the past several years, including the design and development of its full portfolio of websites and digital content. The group also partnered with the California Strawberry Commission, the U.S. Apple Association, the California Table Grape Commission and the Washington Apple Commission in developing the U.S. Fresh Fruit Basic Training Program for global export markets, which has been translated into seven languages.

The Fiction Tribe is a full-service creative agency that develops content marketing, print and digital advertising, and video production for its clients. In addition to produce industry and commodities work, The Fiction Tribe has a strong presence in the technology sector, with clients that include Microsoft, Intel, Parallels and FireEye.

“Cristie brings a wealth of expertise in marketing strategy and content development that will be valuable to our clients,” James Rice, cofounder of The Fiction Tribe, said in a press release. “I am thrilled to have her join our hardworking team in a leadership role.”

“We wish Cristie the best in her new role, and are grateful to her for her contributions to the Northwest pear industry’s success over the past several years,” Kevin Moffitt, president and chief executive officer of Pear Bureau Northwest, added in the press release.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Northwest pear growers forecast larger crop than originally expected

With harvest currently underway, representatives of the Northwest pear industry have officially updated their initial projections for the 2014 fresh pear crop yield.

Reports of a crop of excellent quality have been confirmed from all corners of the pear-growing regions in Washington and Oregon, and the updated projection is showing a crop larger than previously forecast in the spring.

The revised estimate points to more than 20.2 million standard 44-pound box equivalents (or 445,144 tons) of pears for the fresh market. This estimate is 2 percent larger than the five-year average, and 6 percent smaller than last year’s record crop. The Northwest pear industry’s initial spring projection showed a crop of 18.7 million boxes.

Harvest began in late July with the Starkrimson and Bartlett pear varieties. Anjou, Red Anjou, Bosc, Comice, Concorde, Forelle and Seckel will be picked from late August through mid-October. No significant weather issues have affected the crop to date.

The top three varieties in terms of production remain the same as in previous years: Green Anjou pears are anticipated to make up 53 percent of the total 2014 crop, while Bartlett and Bosc pears are expected to yield 22 percent and 15 percent, respectively.

The updated estimates for the organic portion of the Northwest pear crop have increased proportionally, showing a total of 976,780 standard 44-pound box equivalents (21,489 tons) of organic pears in the 2014 harvest. This is an increase of about 3 percent when compared to the 2013 record organic crop, and a 16.6 percent increase over the five-year average.

“Compared to last year’s record crop, this crop is more consistent with the five-year average,” Kevin Moffitt, president and chief executive officer of the Pear Bureau Northwest, said in a press release. “We’re looking forward to another crop of excellent quality and fruit size to meet the demands of the domestic and export markets. Our representatives across North America and around the world have a full season of promotions in place to help boost sales, and we’re looking forward to working with our retail partners in another successful pear season.”

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US: Northwest pear season kicks off early, less production expected

Like many summer crops in Pacific Coast states, the pear season in the Pacific Northwest began earlier than usual. The alternating nature of the crop also means that this year’s production will likely be less than what was harvested during last year’s big season.

Pears from the Pacific Northwest are usually harvested from July through October, though picking began a little earlier than normal. But that head start wasn’t huge, noted Cristie Mather, director of communications for Pear Burea Northwest, and the timing is in line with typical harvest timing. Production, however, is expected to be less than what was achieved last season.

“The dip in production is due to the natural cyclical nature of pear tree production,” explained Mather. “Crop yields alternate between larger crops and smaller crops each year. Last year was a larger crop year, so this year we can expect to see a smaller crop year. Next year we will be back into a larger crop yield.” Estimates put this year’s fresh pear production at 18.7 million 44-pound equivalent boxes, or 411,400 tons. That’s 13 percent smaller than last year’s crop and six percent smaller than the five-year production average for the region.

Demand this season is expected to build on the upward trend established over the past few years in both the domestic market and the export market.

“The 2013-2014 season will be the second consecutive season that total Northwest pear exports have surpassed the $ 200 million mark,” noted Jeff Correa, international marketing director for Pear Bureau Northwest. “The 2013-14 season will near the record established last season, but will most likely end up being the second highest export value season for the industry.” With nearly 42 percent of exports going to Mexico, Correa predicted that about 4.0 million boxes will reach that market this season. Canada will likely come in second with 2.1 million boxes, and Russia, the United Arab Emirates, Colombia, Brazil, India and China round out the list of export destinations. The latter market is of particular note, considering it was only fairly recently that Northwest growers were able to ship pears there.

“Northwest pear shippers sent a few containers initially after the opening of the market in January 2013, and the 2013-14 season was the first full season for Northwest pear shipments to the market, with 184,840 boxes shipped to China – substantially higher than our initial expectations,” said Correa. “While we expected China to emerge as one of the industry’s top Red Pear markets, it also emerged as a better than expected market for the Green Anjou variety as well. China ended this past season as the industry’s sixth largest Green Anjou export market, the second-largest Red Anjou export market and top export market for Starkrimson pears.”

For more information:

Cristie Mather

Pear Bureau Northwest

+1 503 652 9720

FreshPlaza.com

Conditions favorable for Northwest crop of blues

Blueberry production continues to be a growth industry in the Pacific Northwest. “Freshly harvested Oregon blueberries, one of the joys of summer, are on the way, and this year’s crop is looking bigger and better than ever,” said the Oregon Blueberry Commission on its website. “In fact, Oregon growers are expected to harvest more than 70 million pounds of blueberries this year, another production record.”

According to the Washington Blueberry Commission, eastern Washington has approximately 4,300 acres planted to blueberries, and the 2013 season is anticipated to be a good one. Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla and Yakima counties are among the leading production areas.

Crop-OverviewInput from blueberry growers in the Pacific Northwest reveals that the 2013 crop is expected to be one of good volume and high quality. Weather conditions have been termed ideal, and product movement is already underway. (Photo courtesy of California Giant Berry Farms)The region’s growers are enthusiastic about the year’s production prospects. Suzanne Wolter, director of marketing for Rainier Fruit Co. in Yakima, WA, said the company will see a surge in its volume in 2013. She said weather conditions have been ideal for blueberry production, and maturing acreage will account for increased production. “It’s been an ideal growing season, and we’re looking at quality that’s as good as or better than we’ve ever had,” she stated.

According to Bruce Turner, director of sales for Curry & Co. in Brooks, OR, favorable growing conditions mean producers will ramp up production a week earlier than they did in 2012. “We have already written several ads for July 4th, something we haven’t been able to do for several years,” he commented.

And Cindy Jewell, director of marketing for California Giant Blueberry Farms in Watsonville, CA, said consumer demand continues to grow, and retail is responding. “While strawberries still lead the berry category, blueberries are a very strong second year-in and year-out,” she stated.

In July, 2012, the Oregon Department of Agriculture released its publication, Oregon Agriculture: Facts and Figures. The report provided a snapshot of agricultural production for 2011. The Beaver State ranked third nationally for its blueberry production that season, accounting for 19 percent of domestic production. Oregon ranked blueberries as its eighth top commodity at a value of $ 116.8 million in 2011. Blueberries were produced on 7,800 acres, and production was set at 65.5 million pounds.

The Washington Department of Agriculture released its report, The Pride of Washington State, in October 2012. In 2011, Washington was the nation’s fifth-largest blueberry producer, accounting for 14.1 percent of national supplies. The commodity ranked 15th among the Evergreen State’s top agricultural commodities with a value of production set at $ 122 million.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture provided some insights into blueberry production in 2012. According to the report, Noncitrus Fruits and Nuts 2012 Preliminary Summary, which was issued this past January, Oregon harvested 7,900 acres of blues in 2012 with utilized fresh production set at 37.5 million pounds. Washington harvested 8,000 acres, and its utilized fresh production was 35 million pounds.

In 2012, the price per pound for fresh blues was $ 2.04 in Oregon and $ 1.49 in Washington.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Northwest cherry growers gain airlift capacity into Shanghai

Northwest cherry growers gain airlift capacity into Shanghai

Northwest cherry growers gained airlift capacity into China with the launch today of weekly service between Seattle and Shanghai on China Eastern Airlines. The new service serving Seattle-Tacoma International Airport will carry more than 400 metric tons of cherries to China from Northwest shippers.chinaeasternair-logo

In addition, China Eastern runs an e-commerce site, Eastern Origin Express,  seeking to provide a means for consumers to order agricultural products directly from producers from around the world, an effort to reduce costs, improve efficiency and maintain product quality.

The inaugural flight of Seattle-Shangai service was scheduled for a welcome ceremony in Shanghai on June 12. On the following day, China Eastern Airlines’ passengers will be provided free northwest cherry tastings on selected flights.

Northwest Cherry Growers, which markets cherries for growers, welcomed the news.

“The northwest cherry harvest season is just the beginning,” said Keith Hu, director of international operations at Northwest Cherry Growers. “We’re excited to provide the first agricultural product exported to China as part of China Eastern’s new service, and we look forward to providing 1.3 billion Chinese citizens delicious northwest cherries.”

Source: goodfruit.com
 

Publication date: 6/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Northwest cherry growers gain airlift capacity into Shanghai

Northwest cherry growers gain airlift capacity into Shanghai

Northwest cherry growers gained airlift capacity into China with the launch today of weekly service between Seattle and Shanghai on China Eastern Airlines. The new service serving Seattle-Tacoma International Airport will carry more than 400 metric tons of cherries to China from Northwest shippers.chinaeasternair-logo

In addition, China Eastern runs an e-commerce site, Eastern Origin Express,  seeking to provide a means for consumers to order agricultural products directly from producers from around the world, an effort to reduce costs, improve efficiency and maintain product quality.

The inaugural flight of Seattle-Shangai service was scheduled for a welcome ceremony in Shanghai on June 12. On the following day, China Eastern Airlines’ passengers will be provided free northwest cherry tastings on selected flights.

Northwest Cherry Growers, which markets cherries for growers, welcomed the news.

“The northwest cherry harvest season is just the beginning,” said Keith Hu, director of international operations at Northwest Cherry Growers. “We’re excited to provide the first agricultural product exported to China as part of China Eastern’s new service, and we look forward to providing 1.3 billion Chinese citizens delicious northwest cherries.”

Source: goodfruit.com
 

Publication date: 6/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com