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Do alternate varieties offer opportunities for California avocado growers?

It’s no secret that the Hass avocado is the darling of the world. More than 50 years ago, California growers began planting the variety and Mexico followed suit as it eyed the U.S. market, as did Peru and Chile. Colombia began adding Hass acreage to its prodigious supply of native avocados about a decade ago, and it is now also trying to gain access to the lucrative U.S. marketplace.

But is the Hass avocado really the only avocado that consumers will eat?

BellamoreTom BellamoreIn fact, Florida does grow and market its thin-skinned, large green fruit with some success. And at this time of year, some California shippers do have alternate varieties and have experienced good success.

California Avocado Commission President Tom Bellamore believes alternative varieties may offer at least a niche market for California growers as they continue to compete against the growing tide of Hass avocados from various sources.

While California growers argue that their Hass avocado is better during much of their season in the late spring to early fall vs. fruit that travels to the United States from thousands of miles away, no such argument is needed with the other varieties.

Currently only the Hass variety can be imported from Mexico or the other countries.

Bellamore said there is very little worry that a California avocado of the Reed variety, for example, will face direct competition of the same variety from foreign soil. He said CAC board members, as well as others in the industry, are discussing opportunities with other varieties and the concept has some strong advocates.

Bellamore said California is already attempting to distinguish its avocados to discriminating customers by touting its freshness and local appeal, especially to U.S. consumers in the West.

He said adding varieties would expand the portfolio — because they are often harvested at a different time of the year — and also add some year-round marketing punch to the California avocado brand.

“From a marketing perspective, it would be very advantageous to be able to continue talking to consumers all year round about our brand,” he said. “Right now it is very difficult to do that because we don’t have avocados all year round.”

A few shippers are already experiencing success with these “off” varieties.

Jared Bray who handles sales for Stehly Farms Organic in Valley Center, CA, said his packingshed does very well with five different avocado varieties: Zutanos, Bacons, Fuertes, Reeds and Pinkertons.

“It’s a very nice niche for us,” he said. “We actually have a huge following for our Reed avocados.”

Though there are not accurate numbers concerning the total California production of these “off” varieties, some estimate that it could be as high as 5 percent of total volume at this point. This year, that could represent as much as 25 million pounds. Currently much of that production ends up in farmers markets.

Stehly is a producer of organic avocados and Bray said much of the company’s production of organic Reed avocados is sold to Whole Foods, which apparently is very happy with that variety. Bray said it grows larger than the typical Hass with some of the fruit getting as large as two pounds.

“It is my favorite avocado,” he said. “It is nutty and buttery.”

Stehly leaves its Reed variety avocados on the tree as long as possible and tries to market them in the September-through-November time frame, which is at the back end of the California deal.

“By then the oil content is very good and it is just a great piece of fruit,” he said. “I could absolutely ship more if I had them.”

And he added that he always gets a premium for that fruit. He said the other varieties also do well, but the Reed is the real star.

Singing the same tune was Bob Lucy, a partner at Del Rey Avocado Co. in Fallbrook, CA.

“The non-Hass varieties are a very important part of our program,” he said.

Del Rey sells both organic and conventional avocados, and Lucy said the organic production of Reeds is also sold mostly to Whole Foods. But he also has conventional production, which sells for a premium to other retailers predominantly on the West Coast, but there is interest everywhere.

Lucy called the Reed “a big Florida-looking avocado with a pulp that doesn’t quite get as green as the Hass.”

He said the Reed variety has been around for a while but his firm, as well as others, did it a disservice by initially picking it too early.

“We picked it way too early and it didn’t do well,” said Lucy. “Now we keep it on the tree until at least late June and market it in July and August, and it does very well.”

Lucy is quick to say that it has its flaws, including the yellow pulp color that needs to be blended with a Hass for the right guacamole colors. But he said it does offer a niche opportunity for California growers fighting for market share and better pricing.

In fact, Del Rey has made a commitment to that variety, as well as other “off” varieties, by investing in its own nursery to grow root stock.

“One-third of the acreage in that nursery is devoted to Reed,” he said.

Rob Wedin, who is in charge of fresh sales for Calavo Growers in Santa Paula, CA, believes in the concept of expanding California’s variety diversity, but he doesn’t believe the state’s growers have found the right variety yet.

Wedin said most California growers have converted their acreage of Reeds and Fuertes and other varieties to Hass simply because of the economics.

“All other varieties are extremely minor and I don’t really see much opportunity, but I know people are working on some new things and we’d like to see that,” he said. “I just don’t think it is anything we already have.”

He was quick to point out that he does not put the Lamb Hass in that category.

The Lamb Hass is different than the regular Hass, as it has a slightly smoother skin and does tend to grow larger in the early part of the season. But by late June and into July, it behaves like a Hass and is marketed as such.

During the middle of the season, Wedin said the Lamb Hass can account for as much as 15 percent of Calavo’s volume during that period. But again it is largely marketed as a Hass avocado and doesn’t seem to qualify for “off” variety status.

Bellamore said he would like to see more growers add small acreage of the Reed variety precisely to expand the marketing opportunities for growers and the commission.

He said it will take several years to ramp up the volume “even if we start today,” but he added that could coincide perfectly with a growing of that market by shippers and the commission.

And at the end of the day, it could give the “California Avocado” brand an additional way to differentiate itself in the marketplace.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

End of Cuban embargo poses US agricultural export opportunities

End of Cuban embargo poses US agricultural export opportunities

Most trades between Cuba and the United States have been frozen for the last fifty years. 1962 saw a strict increase on restrictions for imported and exported produce between both countries. In 2001 very few agricultural trades were allowed to Cuba.

Despite maintaining small trades, the United States lost over a $ 1billion in potential trade a year.  Cuba suffered similarly with over $ 600million in losses. “From my professional point of view, I am very pleased to see it end. Normal trade relations will open the door to opportunities for importers and exporters within the industry,” explains John Vena, an American importer/exporter at John Vena, Inc. “Currently we export some specialty produce items to Puerto Rico. I believe many of these items will find a market with Cuba as trade relations redevelop.”

The end of the embargo will make it infinitely easier for American fruit and vegetable growers to export to Cuba, as well as for Cuban produce to be imported. “Cuba will have the ability to grow products American importers are searching for, especially tropical and ethnic varieties that we currently import from further markets.”

Since Cuba is the largest Caribbean country, exporters are enthusiastic about prospective trade relations. However, which items to be imported may vary, “it will depend on the first companies to invest and develop the logistic infrastructure needed., states Vena, “there should be an opportunity to redevelop the tomato industry which flourished before the embargo took effect.”

Publication date: 12/23/2014
Author: Kayleigh Csaszar
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Industry leaders see abundant opportunities for fresh produce and floral in 2015

Around the globe, the new year is celebrated in vastly different ways and at different times. Despite our diverse traditions though, I believe December is always a good time to reflect on the past year and prepare for what lies ahead (both good fortune and challenges).

Since members drive PMA’s direction, I asked some U.S. member-leaders what they think are the biggest opportunities for the fresh produce and floral industries in 2015.silbermannBryan Silbermann The lenses they each use to view their world reflect the wonderful diversity that they bring to bear.

 

Kevin Fiori, vice president of sales and marketing, Sunkist Growers and PMA Board of Directors chairperson
As befits a world-class marketer, Kevin focused on connecting with consumers. A few words surfaced when discussing the opportunities of 2015 — food safety, organic vs. conventional, sustainable, local, social responsibility.

Keeping those thoughts in mind, Kevin sees the way we connect to the consumer is changing rapidly. There are various social media conversations taking place that affect the fresh produce industry — some are fact based and others are not.fioreKevin Fiore He stresses that we need to get better at telling our story or it will be told for us, so we must make sure it’s honest and fact-based. There’s no need for embellishment, we have a great story to tell.  

Making sure our honest and compelling story is told is how we’ll boost consumer confidence, according to Kevin.

 

Tim Riley, president, The Giumarra Cos.
Tim likes to kid himself about his focus on technology and operational focus, so we shouldn’t be surprised that he identifies emerging technologies as a major area of focus in the years ahead. He sees further upgrades to more sophisticated software systems for use on-farm and in distribution, and he echoes the comments heard at PMA events this year where Big Data will be coupled with CRM to provide solid process management.  

rileyTim RileyAdvanced dashboards in ERP systems will deliver business intelligence and analytics, and even more importantly, will be built around the business processes of our industry (not off-the-shelf packages modified for us).

Tim calls out the advances being made in aeroponics and recommends we all pay attention to the advances being made in protected agriculture generally as a game-changer.

Tim channels the optimism of Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and sees a bright future for our industry as it adopts the new tools coming its way.

 

Alec Leach, president, Taylor Farms
Alec’s view reflects the big-picture perspective that’s so typical of him personally and his company. He proposed that one of the most important topics for 2015 facing our industry will still be increasing consumption of fresh produce.alecleachAlec Leach

In noting that there are a few ways to help with this ongoing critical goal for both the health of the nation as well as our respective companies, Alec shared his excitement about what programs like eat brighter! can do to help sell fresh produce to a new generation of customers. He also took time to point out our need to successfully understand and implement the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act requirements to enhance both customer and consumer confidence in our fresh products.

 

Debora Coleman, floral sales manager, Albertsons
Debora’s comments are important because they reflect how integral the floral sector has become to driving a fresh image at retail. She commented on the struggle with talent, as sourcing talent remains an ongoing issue. She noted that as the economy has recovered, we have seen some of the talented store-level associates leave for other companies and often leave the industry entirely.

Debora also mentioned that developing a program that helps attract young people to the industry through better advertising and working with area schools will become vital as we all move to increase the talent in our industry. In commenting about some high schools in her area that offer floral design programs, she said that no one is working with them to pull that talent over to our industry, so developing a national campaign will be vital.

 

John Oxford, president and CEO, L&M Cos.
John’s big-picture view parallels that of his fellow PMA vice chair Alec Leach, with its focus on building consumption.oxford  johnJohn Oxford John noted that while it’s hard to single out just one issue as the most important facing the fresh produce industry, increasing consumption is certainly one of them.

He went on to comment that while the problem is difficult because it’s so broad and all encompassing, it’s also not a short-term problem and there doesn’t appear to be any easy low-hanging fruit.

That being said, John believes that the bigger the challenge the bigger the opportunity. Therefore, he stated, as an industry we must combine all of our resources from great tasting, innovative, easy-to-eat products to marketing movements like eat brighter! to leading the way in low-cost production. We must keep our eye on the prize of a thriving fresh fruit and vegetable industry in a healthier, more productive global economy.

 

Drew Yurko, CFO, FreshPoint
Drew-YurkoDrew YurkoPMA’s new treasurer, Drew Yurko, shares Debora’s focus on talent, not surprising for someone who was a standout at the PMA Foundation’s first Emerging Leaders Program a few years ago.

Drew noted that attracting enough top talent to fill our leadership pipeline is a key priority because once people get into the produce industry, they tend to love it. The trick is enlisting quality individuals who haven’t been exposed to our industry through family or friends. To work toward filling this need, Drew plans to continue to network in our communities both formally and informally, and focus on mining the candidate pool that is available through the PMA Foundation for Industry Talent.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com