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U.S.: Stable start for Chilean orange season despite higher volume

While recent reports suggest quality problems have set back pricing for Chilean lemons and easy peelers, the first weeks of the season showed a strong footing for the country’s oranges in the U.S.

According to figures from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Chilean orange prices stood at US$ 22/15kg (33lbs) box last week, which is similar to the level they were at for the same period in 2015.

South African orange prices were also within the historic two-year average at US$ 24/15kg (33lbs) box.

Chilean orange shipments started in June and until the first week of July they reached 7,483 metric tons (MT), representing a rise of 11% year-on-year, according to Chilean statistics agency Odepa.

As has been the trend at this time of year, the U.S. has accounted for 85% of Chile’s shipments.

In 2015, Chile finished the orange season with 69,170MT exported, recovering from a low of 57,445MT in 2014.

In terms of easy peelers, a representative from the Chilean Citrus Committee has told the local press there has been a lot of fruit with seeds this year due to cross-pollination.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

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US: Larger orange production expected in 2014-2015

The latest USDA orange forecast predicts the 2014-2015 crop will be slightly bigger than the 2013-2014 one.

Last season’s orange production in the United States reached 156.4 million boxes, and, if the the latest USDA forecast pans out, the upcoming season’s production will be 2.5 percent larger than that. Production for the 2014-2015 orange season is expected to reach 160.4 million boxes, with gains in both Valencia and non-Valencia orange production. Florida, the state with the largest production of oranges in the country, is expected to have 108.0 million boxes of oranges for the upcoming season.

Grapefruit production is forecast to dip to 24.8 million boxes for the upcoming season – down from the previous season’s production of 25.4 million boxes. Florida’s production of grapefruit is expected to decrease only slightly, from 15.7 million boxes last season to 15.0 million boxes for 2014-2015.

Lemon production is expected to decrease by 800,000 boxes for the upcoming season, with production in California, the state that grows the most lemons, remaining unchanged at 19.0 million boxes.

FreshPlaza.com

Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Experts predict a spike in the price of Florida’s citrus this upcoming harvest season, meaning slightly more revenue for the state’s farmers. But an unexpected increase in orange production could keep retail prices low.

Citrus greening is a bacterial disease that’s cut Florida’s citrus crops in half since it first struck the state’s trees in 2005. The lower supply has helped farmers fetch higher prices per orange. But, former University of Florida professor of agricultural economics Tom Spreen says farmers are still having a hard time breaking even.

But a bit of relief could come in this upcoming harvest, with the most recent projection showing a slightly higher orange output. That means retail prices on orange products could stabilize, even though wholesale prices might be higher. Florida Department of Citrus economist Marisa Zansler says the increased production is unexpected after several seasons of decline. She adds scientific advances in the fight against citrus greening disease, and a government replanting program, give hope for a revitalization of the industry.

Some remain more cautiously optimistic. Retired UF professor Spreen says the citrus industry is in need of help sooner, rather than later.

“My guess is that a solution will be found, or it may even be solutions,” Spreen says. “There may in fact be a number of tactics that are developed. It’s just the question right now is how soon is it going to come?”

Spreen says some orange juice producers have begun offering subsidies to encourage wary farmers to plant more trees.

Please visit www.wfsu.org for more information.

Publication date: 10/30/2014


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Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Experts predict a spike in the price of Florida’s citrus this upcoming harvest season, meaning slightly more revenue for the state’s farmers. But an unexpected increase in orange production could keep retail prices low.

Citrus greening is a bacterial disease that’s cut Florida’s citrus crops in half since it first struck the state’s trees in 2005. The lower supply has helped farmers fetch higher prices per orange. But, former University of Florida professor of agricultural economics Tom Spreen says farmers are still having a hard time breaking even.

But a bit of relief could come in this upcoming harvest, with the most recent projection showing a slightly higher orange output. That means retail prices on orange products could stabilize, even though wholesale prices might be higher. Florida Department of Citrus economist Marisa Zansler says the increased production is unexpected after several seasons of decline. She adds scientific advances in the fight against citrus greening disease, and a government replanting program, give hope for a revitalization of the industry.

Some remain more cautiously optimistic. Retired UF professor Spreen says the citrus industry is in need of help sooner, rather than later.

“My guess is that a solution will be found, or it may even be solutions,” Spreen says. “There may in fact be a number of tactics that are developed. It’s just the question right now is how soon is it going to come?”

Spreen says some orange juice producers have begun offering subsidies to encourage wary farmers to plant more trees.

Please visit www.wfsu.org for more information.

Publication date: 10/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Forecast shows unexpected growth in Florida orange crops

Experts predict a spike in the price of Florida’s citrus this upcoming harvest season, meaning slightly more revenue for the state’s farmers. But an unexpected increase in orange production could keep retail prices low.

Citrus greening is a bacterial disease that’s cut Florida’s citrus crops in half since it first struck the state’s trees in 2005. The lower supply has helped farmers fetch higher prices per orange. But, former University of Florida professor of agricultural economics Tom Spreen says farmers are still having a hard time breaking even.

But a bit of relief could come in this upcoming harvest, with the most recent projection showing a slightly higher orange output. That means retail prices on orange products could stabilize, even though wholesale prices might be higher. Florida Department of Citrus economist Marisa Zansler says the increased production is unexpected after several seasons of decline. She adds scientific advances in the fight against citrus greening disease, and a government replanting program, give hope for a revitalization of the industry.

Some remain more cautiously optimistic. Retired UF professor Spreen says the citrus industry is in need of help sooner, rather than later.

“My guess is that a solution will be found, or it may even be solutions,” Spreen says. “There may in fact be a number of tactics that are developed. It’s just the question right now is how soon is it going to come?”

Spreen says some orange juice producers have begun offering subsidies to encourage wary farmers to plant more trees.

Please visit www.wfsu.org for more information.

Publication date: 10/30/2014


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Fresh Summit exhibitors donate 217,667 pounds of produce to help Orange County families

Following the Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit Convention & Expo held Oct. 17-19 in Anaheim, CA, exhibitors donated 217,667 pounds of produce to Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County. Over the past decade, PMA exhibitors have donated more than 2.9 million pounds of fresh produce to communities in need in the United States.

pmadonationPMA Fresh Summit exhibitors donated 217,667 pounds of produce to Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County.More than 277,000 people in Orange County, CA, need the help of Second Harvest and its community partners to feed themselves and their families, according to a new study by Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County and Feeding America. Some of those families will benefit from the generous donation.

The fresh produce was collected from the convention center expo hall by approximately 300 volunteers from the Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County. The food bank is a chapter of Feeding America, a national non-profit organization that works to feed more than 37 million people a year.  

“Feeding America is extremely grateful to PMA’s exhibitors who have gone to great effort to provide this generous donation of fresh produce to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County,” Bob Aiken, chief executive officer of Feeding America, said in a press release. “PMA goes to great lengths every year to rescue, package and transport a considerable amount of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables to our member food banks, so that they can be distributed to low-income Americans, who are in need of food assistance. Feeding America will provide food to 46 million Americans this year, including 12 million children and 7 million seniors.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA predicts larger Florida orange crop for 2014-15

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its initial forecast for 2014-15, pegging the orange crop at 108 million boxes, up from last season’s total of 104.4 million.

Early-mid varieties accounted for 52 million boxes, while Valencias came in at 56 million boxes.

“This is a positive number as the Florida citrus grower continues to battle citrus greening disease,” Michael W. Sparks, executive vice president and chief executive officer of Florida Citrus Mutual, said in a press release. “It’s been a tight few years for production and 2014-15 is no different.”

The USDA makes its initial estimate in October of each year and revises it monthly as the crop takes shape until the end of the season in July. The full estimate can be found at http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Florida/Publications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for the complete USDA estimate.

The USDA’s estimate of the 2014-15 Florida grapefruit crop came in at 15 million boxes. Specialty fruit is estimated at 3.7 million boxes. The yield for frozen concentrate orange juice is anticipated to be 1.60 gallons per 90-pound box.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

USDA predicts larger Florida orange crop for 2014-15

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its initial forecast for 2014-15, pegging the orange crop at 108 million boxes, up from last season’s total of 104.4 million.

Early-mid varieties accounted for 52 million boxes, while Valencias came in at 56 million boxes.

“This is a positive number as the Florida citrus grower continues to battle citrus greening disease,” Michael W. Sparks, executive vice president and chief executive officer of Florida Citrus Mutual, said in a press release. “It’s been a tight few years for production and 2014-15 is no different.”

The USDA makes its initial estimate in October of each year and revises it monthly as the crop takes shape until the end of the season in July. The full estimate can be found at http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Florida/Publications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for the complete USDA estimate.

The USDA’s estimate of the 2014-15 Florida grapefruit crop came in at 15 million boxes. Specialty fruit is estimated at 3.7 million boxes. The yield for frozen concentrate orange juice is anticipated to be 1.60 gallons per 90-pound box.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexico: Oil spill affects 10,000 tons of orange in Nuevo Leon

Mexico: Oil spill affects 10,000 tons of orange in Nuevo Leon

Producers from the Township of Cadereyta Jiménez estimated that at least 10,000 tons of oranges had been lost because of the lack of irrigation caused by the oil spill into the San Juan River that a clandestine outlet on Pemex’s pipeline caused. 

The producers presented their estimates at a meeting with deputies of the Special Investigative Committee of the oil spill in the San Juan River.  According to Francisco Javier Limon Guzman, deputy of Santa Isabel’s common land, the orange trees haven’t been irrigated since August 16, when the clandestine outlet on kilometre 463.5 of the Madero-Cadereyta pipeline was detected. 

“There are two or three early orange varieties, one is cut at the beginning of the month, and, in fact we already lost that one. Then there is the late orange, which we can start cutting from December 15. We are talking about 20,000 tons in all the area,” he said. 

Half of that amount, he said, would result in beeing affected by the ecological contingency in the San Juan River, so we would need to bring citrus from other areas of the country to supply local demand. Limón Guzmán noted that the authorities are aware of the issue and have been waiting for Pemex to perform actions to clean up the affected area. 

Within this process, he said, the landowners have presented documents that show which plots have been affected and are expecting compensation from Pemex. 

“We need to water the trees so that the fruit can develop and so that the trees can bloom next year. Hence, this is affecting us,” he said in an interview. 

“Yes we will be affected. One of our production is its developmental stage and the other is about to be cut, but when the tree lacks water it feeds from itself so the oranges become loose and start lacking juice,” he said. 

It was agreed, at the meeting with local representatives, that the needs of the affected population would be monitored in order to try the ecological problem more quickly. 

Source: 20minutos.com.mx

Publication date: 9/15/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian orange crop expected to increase

Brazilian orange crop expected to increase

Despite a dip in production from the two largest orange-producing regions in Brazil, the fresh orange crop for the 2014-2015 season is expected to be larger than the one from the previous season.

The fresh orange crop for the 2014-2015 season is expected to reach 425 million boxes, according to a report released by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. That haul, if it pans out, would be an increase of six percent over the previous season’s crop. The two largest orange-producing regions in the country, Sao Paulo and the western part of Minas Gerais, are expected to produce 310 million boxes, which is 10 million boxes short of what they produced the previous season.

Domestic prices for fresh oranges for the first quarter of 2014 were reported as being the highest they’ve been during a first quarter of the year since 2011. Fruit yield for the 2013-2014 is estimated at 2.07 boxes per tree, and planted area is expected to hold steady at 715,000 hectares.

Publication date: 7/4/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian orange crop expected to increase

Brazilian orange crop expected to increase

Despite a dip in production from the two largest orange-producing regions in Brazil, the fresh orange crop for the 2014-2015 season is expected to be larger than the one from the previous season.

The fresh orange crop for the 2014-2015 season is expected to reach 425 million boxes, according to a report released by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. That haul, if it pans out, would be an increase of six percent over the previous season’s crop. The two largest orange-producing regions in the country, Sao Paulo and the western part of Minas Gerais, are expected to produce 310 million boxes, which is 10 million boxes short of what they produced the previous season.

Domestic prices for fresh oranges for the first quarter of 2014 were reported as being the highest they’ve been during a first quarter of the year since 2011. Fruit yield for the 2013-2014 is estimated at 2.07 boxes per tree, and planted area is expected to hold steady at 715,000 hectares.

Publication date: 7/4/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Florida orange crop estimate drops again

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s forecast of the 2013-14 Florida orange crop decreased 6 million boxes to 104.3 million boxes. While early-mid varieties accounted for 53.3 million boxes, Valencias dropped 6 million boxes to 51 million boxes.

“This decrease is about what we expected with the continuing effects of HLB, or citrus greening so we are not surprised,” Michael W. Sparks, executive vice president and chief executive officer of Florida Citrus Mutual, said in a press release. “The flip side is without the resiliency and superior production methods of the Florida citrus grower it could have been worse. The crop is still very high quality.”

More than 750 people are gathered June 11-13 for the Florida Citrus Industry Annual Conference at the Hyatt Coconut Point in Bonita Springs to discuss the state of the Florida citrus industry. The annual event mixes business, industry issues and camaraderie.

“Our record Conference attendance even in these trying times is a testament to our commitment to the future of our $ 9 billion industry and the 76,000 jobs it supports,” Sparks said in the release.

During the 2012-13 season, Florida produced 133.6 million boxes of oranges.

The USDA’s estimate of the 2013-14 Florida grapefruit crop stayed at 15.6 million boxes, and specialty fruit held steady at 3.83 million boxes.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Spain: 80% of Huelva’s late orange still unharvested

Andalusia
Spain: 80% of Huelva’s late orange still unharvested

80% of Huelva’s late oranges are still on the tree, as “the price paid at origin is so low that producers are considering whether or not it is worth harvesting them.” 

This was stated by the president of the Citrus Growers Association of Huelva, Lorenzo Reyes, who explained that the situation is not final. “Much of it will be harvested gradually, depending on how the market evolves.” However, Reyes describes the current campaign as “terrible, because prices have remained at rock bottom prices.” In fact, orange prices at origin have oscillated between 0.16 and 0.17 Euro / kilo, and in recent weeks they have dropped even lower, down to between 0.11 and 0.12 Euro / kilo; well below the production costs, which according to growers, stand at around 0.18-0.20 Euro / kilo.” The average profitable price to be able to face the next season is of about 0.30 Euro / kilo.

“These prices will cause many growers to have serious funding problems next season,” lamented Lorenzo Reyes. And this despite having achieved a good production in the province, with 295,000 tonnes; 2.5% more than last year, but consumption levels have remained very low, which has led to a sharp drop in prices. 

The quality of the production this campaign has suffered because calibres have been slightly smaller and the fruit’s external appearance has been affected by issues such as the ‘clareta’, ie white spots caused by the weather conditions, which does not have an impact on the fruit’s taste. Both factors have contributed to lower prices. However, there has also been fruit “of optimum quality that has not reached the market value of other years,” said Reyes.

In this context, the president of Huelva’s growers association stressed that “production costs such as fertilisers, labour, etc. continue to increase, making the situation very difficult for growers.”

The positive note has been that the mandarin campaign “has gone well,” affirmed Reyes. Most citrus growers have managed to diversify their production, and as such those who grow oranges also cultivate mandarins. The fact that the results in recent seasons have been better for mandarins than for oranges is leading producers to expand the acreage of the former. Right now, from the 16,600 hectares of citrus plantations in the province of Huelva, 56% correspond to oranges and 44% to mandarins, with a clear trend of the latter to continue expanding. In fact, the province of Huelva is the leading mandarin producer in Andalusia.

Fuente: diariodehuelva.es

Publication date: 5/29/2014


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Florida orange crop forecast sees slight increase

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s monthly forecast of the 2013-14 Florida orange crop inched up 300,000 boxes to 110.3 million boxes.

Early-mid varieties accounted for the full increase, coming in at 53.3 million boxes. Valencias remained at 57 million boxes.

“This is good news and we are hopeful there will not be any more decreases throughout the last two months of season,” Michael W. Sparks, executive vice president and chief executive officer of Florida Citrus Mutual, said in a press release. “It has been a challenging season to say the least, but growers continue to produce quality fruit, which is a testament to their resiliency.”

During the 2012-13 season, Florida produced 133.6 million boxes of oranges. 

The USDA’s estimate of the 2013-14 Florida grapefruit crop decreased 400,000 boxes from 16 million boxes to 15.6 million boxes. White grapefruit increased by 100,000 boxes while colored grapefruit were reduced by 500,000 boxes. Specialty fruit held steady at 3.83 million boxes.

For the complete USDA estimate, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Florida/Publications/Citrus/cpfp.htm.

The Florida citrus industry creates a $ 9 billion annual economic impact, employing nearly 76,000 people, and covering about 525,000 acres.

Founded in 1948, Florida Citrus Mutual is one of the state’s larger citrus grower organizations. For more information, visit www.flcitrusmutual.com.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Spain: Delays in orange harvest due to weather conditions

50% of the harvest completed
Spain: Delays in orange harvest due to weather conditions

The citrus harvest campaign in the area of Vega del Guadalquivir, Spain, is suffering some delays as a result of the weather. The president of Asaja, Ignacio Fernández de Mesa, explained that, “the rains are not causing damages, but are delaying the harvest. For now the presence of fungi has not been detected and the fruit is healthy.” He admitted that he is “not sure whether other plantations have been affected by the wind, but even if that was the case, they would be isolated cases.”

Fernández de Mesa showed his optimism after successfully completing the first harvest campaign. He stated that work is currently focused on the late varieties, of which 50% will be marketed for fresh consumption and the other 50% will go to the juice industry. “The first campaign finished with better prices than last year and now they should remain at acceptable levels after two disastrous years.”

Source: diariocordoba.com

Publication date: 2/17/2014


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