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S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

European peach and nectarine estimate reduced

The estimates for European production of peaches and nectarines has been reduced by 7% since the last estimate announced at Europech in April.

Elisa Macchi, director of CSO presented the data regarding the production and sale of peaches and nectarines in Europe during the “Frutta d’estate. Progetti approfondimenti e prospettive” conference held in Bologna on 10th June


From 2000 to 2010, the growing area in Italy shrunk from 82,401 to 65,955 hectares, a 20% decrease. However, despite the fact that growing area in regions such as Emilia Romagna (-35%), Veneto (-33%) and Lazio -52%) have been reduced, Puglia and Sicily have 60% and 20% increases respectively.

The decrease in area at a national level of course meant less production, and the potential dropped from almost 1.8 to 1.6 million tons.

Regarding the trend elsewhere in Europe, France went from 450,000 to less than 300,000 tons, whereas Spain increased from 500,000 to almost 900,000 tons. Greece remained at around 300,000 tons.

The director of the CSO also talked about Catalonia as an example, as it concentrated more than 30% of the Spanish production. In this region, production went from 250,000 tons in the first years of the 00s to 400,000 tons of 2011. Other regions such as Rioja, Navarra and Aragon have also increased. In particular, peach volumes went from 60,000 to 130,000 tons, nectarines went from 60,000 to almost 180,000 tons and flat peaches to 60,000 in 2012.


Going back to Italy, Macchi talked about the sales trends for peaches, which from 2005 to 2012 have increased by 6%, and for nectarines, which from 2010 to 2012 have decreased by 3%.

Analysing exports, Elisa Macchi underlined how Spain, which went from 300,000 to 650,000 tons, exports almost 80% of its production.

Greece, which has been increasing recently, reached 160,000 tons in 2012, 50% of its production. Italy, however, dropped from 400,000 tons to 350,000, 24-25% of the peach and nectarine production.

In particular, Italian exports are constant in July and August (even in June), though they drop in September, after they had been rising in the first few years of the 00s.

Spain increases all volumes between June and October. Only May is stable or slightly decreasing, even though the month is still dominated by Spain. The exports of France and Greece are only marginal. French volumes are diminishing whereas the Greek ones seem more constant but are only representative in June/July. 


Elisa Macchi also compared production costs of Big Tops and the cost of placing the product in punnets in Italy (in blue, Emilia Romagna) and Spain (in red, Catalonia) which brought to light the fact that Italy is not competitive as regards variable, raw material and labour costs.


2013 expectations
What Elisa Macchi anticipated on June 10th has been confirmed by the latest estimates by the CSO on June 15th i.e. the 2013 production of peaches and nectarines in Italy, estimated at 1,520,000 tons has shrunk by 7% with respect to 2012.


This year’s drop in production, mostly due to bad weather in Spring, regards both peaches and nectarines, both registering -7%.


The production is of around 784,000 tons in Southern Italy (-8% with respect to 2012) and almost 642,000 tons in the North (-5%). In this case, the loss is not as bad because Piedmontese production returned normal after one year of productive deficit. 


This year, the development and ripening of fruit were late with respect to last year and, while in the South it could be recuperated towards harvesting time, it was not possible in the North. The varied ripening calendars prevented production from overlapping and therefore there was a difference between early productions in the South and the late ones in the North. 

Updates from other countries
At a European level, a 7% drop with respect to 2012 is expected in 2013, an 8% drop with regards to the last five years.


In Greece, hailstorms affected volumes, which are hovering around 175,000 tons for peaches (-24% than 2012) and 57,000 tons for nectarines (-29%).

France produces around 258,000 tons (-8% than 2012).

Spanish production is also decreasing: the production of fresh peaches (excluding flat peaches) is expected to be around 293,000 tons, +12% than 2012 though only -4% with respect to 2011. Flat peaches increase, and are now around 130,000 tons thanks to the fact that younger orchards started producing. Nectarines register +7% with respect to 2012, though -7% with respect to 2011.

“There are two considerations to make from the domestic and European data. At a European level, we must consider that last year there were no surpluses both from a total volume and weekly income point of view.

“Last year, Spain had problems both in the early and late period because of hailstorms. The increase is due to a confrontation with the low production of 2012 and the levels expected this year are definitely lower than the potential this country has. The other aspect we must consider is the good timing of the productions, which should avoid surpluses which often penalize the market.”

FreshPlaza.com

It’s the pits: Ancient peach stones offer clues to fruit’s origins

As peach trees in the Niagara Region of Ontario give up the last of their fruit for the season, their ancestors halfway around the globe are clamouring for attention.

In a study published in PLOS ONE, Gary Crawford, a U of T Mississauga anthropology professor, and two Chinese colleagues propose that the domestic peaches enjoyed worldwide today can trace their ancestry back at least 7,500 years ago to the lower Yangtze River Valley in Southern China, not far from Shanghai. The study, headed by Yunfei Zheng from the Zhejiang Institute of Archeology in China’s Zhejiang Province, was done in collaboration with Crawford and X. Chen, another researcher at the Zhejang Institute.

“Previously, no one knew where peaches were domesticated,” said Crawford. “None of the botanical literature suggested the Yangtze Valley, although many people thought that it happened somewhere in China.”

Radiocarbon dating of ancient peach stones (pits) discovered in the Lower Yangtze River Valley indicates that the peach seems to have been diverged from its wild ancestors as early as 7,500 years ago.

Archeologists have a good understanding of domestication — conscious breeding for traits preferred by people- of annual plants such as grains (rice, wheat, etc.), but the role of trees in early farming and how trees were domesticated is not well documented. Unlike most trees, the peach matures very quickly, producing fruit within two to three years, so selection for desirable traits could become apparent relatively quickly. The problem that Crawford and his colleagues faced was how to recognize the selection process in the archeological record.

Peach stones are well represented at archeological sites in the Yangtze valley, so they compared the size and structure of the stones from six sites that spanned a period of roughly 5,000 years. By comparing the size of the stones from each site, they were able to discern peaches growing significantly larger over time in the Yangtze valley, demonstrating that domestication was taking place. The first peach stones in China most similar to modern cultivated forms are from the Liangzhu culture, which flourished 4,300 to 5300 years ago.

“We’re suggesting that very early on, people understood grafting and vegetative reproduction, because it sped up selection,” Crawford said. “They had to have been doing such work, because seeds have a lot of genetic variability, and you don’t know if a seed will produce the same fruit as the tree that produced it. It’s a gamble. If they simply started grafting, it would guarantee the orchard would have the peaches they wanted.”

Crawford and his colleagues think that it took about 3,000 years before the domesticated peach resembled the fruit we know today.

“The peaches we eat today didn’t grow in the wild,” Crawford added. “Generation after generation kept selecting the peaches they enjoyed. The product went from thinly fleshed, very small fruit to what we have today. Peaches produce fruit over an extended season today but in the wild they have a short season. People must have selected not only for taste and fruit size, but for production time too.”

Discovering more about the origins of domesticated peaches tells us more about our human ancestors, too, Crawford noted.

Crops such as domesticated peaches indicate that early people weren’t passive in dealing with the environment. Not only did they understand grain production, but the woodlands and certain trees were being manipulated early on.

“There is a general sense that people in the past were not as smart as we are,” said Crawford. “The reality is that they were modern humans with the brain capacity and talents that we have now.

“People have been changing the environment to suit their needs for a very long time, and the domestication of peaches helps us understand this.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. The original article was written by Elaine Smith. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Southwest Michigan peach deal begins

Peach harvest in southwest Michigan is under way. “A few are in now,” said Barry Winkel, the partner and general manager of Benton Harbor, MI-based Greg Orchards & Produce Inc. The volume will grow in the last days of July.

Red Haven peach harvest will begin from this area in the first week of August, Winkel said. Southwest Michigan’s peach trees were hurt by bitterly cold weather last winter. Winkel expected about two-thirds to three-fourths of a full peach crop.

Over the winter, a couple of times temperatures in those orchards bounced as low as -17 degrees Fahrenheit. “Usually if you get to -10 it really gets iffy,” he said. “I’m surprised we got through with what we did.”

Growers around Benton Harbor have experienced a cool, wet summer. “Today the highs will be in the mid- to high 70s, and the low tonight will be in the 50s,” he said. The rain helps the size “but sometimes it affects the flavor. If it stays warm now, we will be fine.”

Winkel said local demand “will gobble up all the peaches we have.” Buyers in Michigan and surrounding states — certainly including Illinois and particularly Chicago — create very strong markets.

“We are within 500 miles of a lot of people,” he said. “We have more requests from buyers for pictures and the backgrounds of our growers, as they tout locally grown.’”

In southwest Michigan, the apple harvest will begin with Paula Reds in the third week of August.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Retailers can bank on bumper S.C. peach crop: Eubanks

COLUMBIA, SC — Supermarket produce departments can bank on an excellent volume of quality South Carolina peaches this summer, despite a cold snap that damaged early-season peaches in the state, said Martin Eubanks, South Carolina assistant commissioner of agriculture.

“We lost the first six weeks of the growing season due to a late-spring freeze, but we’ll have high volume and high-quality peaches in the peak production months of July and August in South Carolina,” Eubanks said in a July 7 interview here.Martin-Eubanks-1Martin Eubanks He is a 28-year veteran of the department and an old hand at riding the weather roller-coaster for produce crops. “We had several bad spells of weather; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Handling is critical for peaches to reach the customer in prime condition. “They are hand-picked in a ‘hard-ripe’ condition so they won’t be bruised in shipping,” he said. “Then they are chilled for a day, which puts them to sleep so that they don’t ripen further until placed on the shelf.” The slumbering peaches are shipped at just above freezing temperature, so they arrive at supermarkets in prime condition.

“Consumers can let them ripen at home at room temperature, and then enjoy dessert-quality, free-stone peaches,” Eubanks stated. Storing them in the refrigerator is a no-no, he added.

South Carolina, despite being a small state (it ranks 41 in size among the 50 states), ranks high in produce. It is the nation’s second-largest grower of peaches, behind California and ahead of The Peach State, Georgia. The state places in the top 10 for leafy greens, cantaloupe, peanuts, watermelons, tomatoes, mixed vegetables and sweet potatoes, Eubanks noted, and its Southeast location allows overnight shipments to reach most of the U.S. population.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New Jersey Peach Promotion Council touting high-quality state-grown peaches

Pegi Adam, director of communications for the New Jersey Peach Promotion Council, told The Produce News that the council has produced two videos for retailers to use in their closed loop televisions — one meant for produce professionals and the other for consumers.14-Buyer-guide-Cover0527201

“Supermarkets will start buying Jersey peaches in mid-July due to the crop running a little late this year,” said Adam. “The videos should be ready by that time. One will help produce workers learn how to increase sales by rotating the peaches and offer display tips and advice. The other is for consumers and provides storage, handling and usage tips.”

The council announced in June that the 2014 edition of the New Jersey Peach Buyers Guide is now available. It offers valuable information for wholesale and retail buyers on where and how to buy and handle New Jersey peaches and nectarines.

“The guide lists, in alphabetical order, growers and shippers of New Jersey peaches including their brands, and general information on what and how they ship,” said Adam. “This section has been completely rewritten for easier use and placement on the New Jersey Peaches website at www.jerseypeaches.com. It also contains a complete listing of farm market retailers of Jersey peaches with their websites.”

She noted that the guide has been an important source of information for the media over the years because it provides details and statistics on the peach industry. Color photos of some of the most important varieties are highlighted along with details on when they are available for buyers. Information also is included on the 2014 Jersey Fresh promotional program for peaches and the quality-grading program run by the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. Details on officers and directors of the New Jersey Peach Promotion Council are listed along with an outline of plans for the 2014 promotional program on peaches.

The guide is available by contacting jfrecon@verizon.net.

“We are also having a phone survey conducted this year,” said Adam. The phone poll is being conducted by Fairleigh Dickinson University.

“People will be asked where they see Jersey peaches advertised, where they buy them and other questions related to how they are aware of Jersey peaches. The results of the survey will be released in August,” Adam said.

She also mentioned the Just Peachy Salsa campaign that combines the generosity of Jersey peach growers and the Campbell’s [Soup Co. Foundation] to benefit the South Jersey Food Bank. Jersey growers donate the fruit and Campbell’s volunteers the labor and time to produce the salsa, which is then donated to the food bank. It is sold in numerous retail, farm markets and specialty stores, and it can be ordered on the food bank’s website.

Increasingly more stores, farm markets and foodservice operators are jumping on board each year for the council’s Peach Party events to promote New Jersey peaches. Last year it had 35 events, and Adam said that she hopes to top that number again this year.

“People are still booking them, so we won’t know until the end of the season how many we’ll end up having, but the numbers climb every year,” she said. “Participants are allowed to develop their own event in ways that work best for them. A retail store, for example, can display banners and offer samplings. Farm stands can organize events that include activities for participants and restaurants can create a menu that includes peaches. They want to hold their events under our umbrellas because they can use our point of sale materials, such as our brochures and banners.”

Adam said that the New Jersey peach crop looks vigorous this year and is expected to yield 30,000 tons to 35,000 tons of fruit from the state’s 5,500 acres of trees.

Jerry Frecon, Rutgers professor emeritus of fruit science, a consultant to the council, and editor of the annual New Jersey Peach Buyers Guide, said, “Our peach buds survived a brutal winter, a cool and frosty spring and are still loaded with fruit.”

He added that some of the best growers of the year’s peach crop are excited about the quality and size of their crops. This summer’s favorite fruit is coming to market about ten days later than usual, around the second week in July, according to growers polled.

The peach promotion council stresses that New Jersey’s more than 100 varieties ripen at different times through the summer, starting with white-fleshed and yellow cling peaches and nectarines, and proceeding with yellow-flesh, flat and nectarines throughout August and into September.

“We want retailers to know that our high-quality New Jersey peaches are available throughout most of September — especially true this year because the season will wrap up late due to the late start,” said Adam. “We encourage retailers and foodservice operators to promote and offer peaches to consumers and to help get the word out. It’s still warm in September, and people, kids included, love the sweet juicy peaches and nectarines.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New Jersey Peach Promotion Council touting high-quality state-grown peaches

Pegi Adam, director of communications for the New Jersey Peach Promotion Council, told The Produce News that the council has produced two videos for retailers to use in their closed loop televisions — one meant for produce professionals and the other for consumers.14-Buyer-guide-Cover0527201

“Supermarkets will start buying Jersey peaches in mid-July due to the crop running a little late this year,” said Adam. “The videos should be ready by that time. One will help produce workers learn how to increase sales by rotating the peaches and offer display tips and advice. The other is for consumers and provides storage, handling and usage tips.”

The council announced in June that the 2014 edition of the New Jersey Peach Buyers Guide is now available. It offers valuable information for wholesale and retail buyers on where and how to buy and handle New Jersey peaches and nectarines.

“The guide lists, in alphabetical order, growers and shippers of New Jersey peaches including their brands, and general information on what and how they ship,” said Adam. “This section has been completely rewritten for easier use and placement on the New Jersey Peaches website at www.jerseypeaches.com. It also contains a complete listing of farm market retailers of Jersey peaches with their websites.”

She noted that the guide has been an important source of information for the media over the years because it provides details and statistics on the peach industry. Color photos of some of the most important varieties are highlighted along with details on when they are available for buyers. Information also is included on the 2014 Jersey Fresh promotional program for peaches and the quality-grading program run by the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. Details on officers and directors of the New Jersey Peach Promotion Council are listed along with an outline of plans for the 2014 promotional program on peaches.

The guide is available by contacting jfrecon@verizon.net.

“We are also having a phone survey conducted this year,” said Adam. The phone poll is being conducted by Fairleigh Dickinson University.

“People will be asked where they see Jersey peaches advertised, where they buy them and other questions related to how they are aware of Jersey peaches. The results of the survey will be released in August,” Adam said.

She also mentioned the Just Peachy Salsa campaign that combines the generosity of Jersey peach growers and the Campbell’s [Soup Co. Foundation] to benefit the South Jersey Food Bank. Jersey growers donate the fruit and Campbell’s volunteers the labor and time to produce the salsa, which is then donated to the food bank. It is sold in numerous retail, farm markets and specialty stores, and it can be ordered on the food bank’s website.

Increasingly more stores, farm markets and foodservice operators are jumping on board each year for the council’s Peach Party events to promote New Jersey peaches. Last year it had 35 events, and Adam said that she hopes to top that number again this year.

“People are still booking them, so we won’t know until the end of the season how many we’ll end up having, but the numbers climb every year,” she said. “Participants are allowed to develop their own event in ways that work best for them. A retail store, for example, can display banners and offer samplings. Farm stands can organize events that include activities for participants and restaurants can create a menu that includes peaches. They want to hold their events under our umbrellas because they can use our point of sale materials, such as our brochures and banners.”

Adam said that the New Jersey peach crop looks vigorous this year and is expected to yield 30,000 tons to 35,000 tons of fruit from the state’s 5,500 acres of trees.

Jerry Frecon, Rutgers professor emeritus of fruit science, a consultant to the council, and editor of the annual New Jersey Peach Buyers Guide, said, “Our peach buds survived a brutal winter, a cool and frosty spring and are still loaded with fruit.”

He added that some of the best growers of the year’s peach crop are excited about the quality and size of their crops. This summer’s favorite fruit is coming to market about ten days later than usual, around the second week in July, according to growers polled.

The peach promotion council stresses that New Jersey’s more than 100 varieties ripen at different times through the summer, starting with white-fleshed and yellow cling peaches and nectarines, and proceeding with yellow-flesh, flat and nectarines throughout August and into September.

“We want retailers to know that our high-quality New Jersey peaches are available throughout most of September — especially true this year because the season will wrap up late due to the late start,” said Adam. “We encourage retailers and foodservice operators to promote and offer peaches to consumers and to help get the word out. It’s still warm in September, and people, kids included, love the sweet juicy peaches and nectarines.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Georgia Peach Council launches summertime marketing campaign

Georgia Peach growers are gearing up for a plentiful crop, which is expected to peak in volume and quality during the month of July.  To highlight the flavor of the summertime fruit, the Georgia Peach Council has launched a seasonal marketing campaign aimed at both retailers and consumers.Georgia-Peaches

“There’s nothing like the taste of a Georgia Peach,” the council’s Will McGehee said in a press release. “Our new campaign highlights what has always been the best time of year to enjoy peaches from Georgia.”

For consumers, the council will step up its social media presence by sponsoring three summertime contests. A “Pin it to Win it” Pinterest contest will invite peach lovers to create boards to pin and share Georgia peach recipes (www.pinterest.com/peachesfromGA). An Instagram consumer photo contest is also in the works (www.instagram.com/peachesfromGA). Both contests will use the hashtag, #LoveGeorgiaPeaches, and winners will receive $ 500. Additionally, the Georgia Peach Council will sponsor a “Share Your Summer” giveaway, which lets shoppers of participating grocery stores pin photos to an in-store board or on the grocers’ social media channels.

To extend its brand awareness and educational efforts, the Georgia Peach Council will also schedule a number of television cooking demonstrations in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest.

On the retail side, supermarkets in targeted markets may utilize turnkey point-of-sale merchandising display bins, posters with tips on how to pick the perfect peach and a retail dietitian toolkit complete with recipes, nutritional information, blog posts and thought starters. To encourage dietitians to communicate the healthy benefits of Georgia peaches, the dietitian with the most social media reach will receive an expenses-paid getaway to tour the heart of Georgia’s peach country.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Georgia Peach Council launches summertime marketing campaign

Georgia Peach growers are gearing up for a plentiful crop, which is expected to peak in volume and quality during the month of July.  To highlight the flavor of the summertime fruit, the Georgia Peach Council has launched a seasonal marketing campaign aimed at both retailers and consumers.Georgia-Peaches

“There’s nothing like the taste of a Georgia Peach,” the council’s Will McGehee said in a press release. “Our new campaign highlights what has always been the best time of year to enjoy peaches from Georgia.”

For consumers, the council will step up its social media presence by sponsoring three summertime contests. A “Pin it to Win it” Pinterest contest will invite peach lovers to create boards to pin and share Georgia peach recipes (www.pinterest.com/peachesfromGA). An Instagram consumer photo contest is also in the works (www.instagram.com/peachesfromGA). Both contests will use the hashtag, #LoveGeorgiaPeaches, and winners will receive $ 500. Additionally, the Georgia Peach Council will sponsor a “Share Your Summer” giveaway, which lets shoppers of participating grocery stores pin photos to an in-store board or on the grocers’ social media channels.

To extend its brand awareness and educational efforts, the Georgia Peach Council will also schedule a number of television cooking demonstrations in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest.

On the retail side, supermarkets in targeted markets may utilize turnkey point-of-sale merchandising display bins, posters with tips on how to pick the perfect peach and a retail dietitian toolkit complete with recipes, nutritional information, blog posts and thought starters. To encourage dietitians to communicate the healthy benefits of Georgia peaches, the dietitian with the most social media reach will receive an expenses-paid getaway to tour the heart of Georgia’s peach country.

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Cold snap adding to woes for peach growers on U.S. East Coast

Cold snap adding to woes for peach growers on U.S. East Coast

A cold snap gripping the U.S. East Coast today is bad news for farmers whose peaches and other spring crops are already suffering the effects of bad weather.
Consumers, too, may feel the impact of poor growing conditions in states such as California, the biggest fruit and vegetable producer, and South Carolina.

“Prices are going to be up in May and June,” said Chalmers Carr, president of Titan Farms LLC, a 5,000-acre farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina, that sells peaches in the eastern U.S. through Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Kroger Co. and other grocers. “Finding southern peaches on a store shelf is going to be a challenge.”

Fresh fruit and vegetable prices already increased 1.5 percent so far in the first three months of this year, according to the Labor Department. A lack of rain in California, crop disease among Florida oranges and other disruptions have pushed costs up faster than overall inflation, with orange-juice futures traded in New York at a two-year high last week.

Excessive rain and cold prompted the U.S. Department of Agriculture to declare disasters this year in New York and North Carolina. Florida is the nation’s third-biggest fruit and vegetable producer after California and Washington, while Georgia is fourth in vegetables and sixth in fruit. New York is the fifth-biggest U.S. grower of fruit and sixth in vegetables.

The U.S. last month recorded its lowest average temperature for March since 2002, according to government data. Losses from a late-March frost in southeastern states won’t be known for about a week, said Martin Eubanks, South Carolina’s assistant agriculture commissioner.

“We had some impact on a lot of crops across the board,” with effects varying depending on where each was in the growing cycle, Eubanks said. “We’re just walking through it, trying to see where we are.’”

South Carolina is the nation’s No. 2 peach producer, behind California. Georgia, where license plates show a picture of a peach, is a distant No. 3, followed by New Jersey.

Only 9 percent of South Carolina’s peach crop was rated “good” or “excellent” in the week ended April 13, according to USDA data, while 74 percent of the rye crop and 80 percent of winter wheat, two of the state’s other spring products, earned similar ratings.

Source: businessweek.com

Publication date: 4/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

US (GA): Light peach crop likely in May

With growers still assessing the damage from a freeze earlier this month, it’s likely that early volumes of Georgia peaches will be light in May.

“The crop in Georgia this year will be an interesting one,” said Will McGehee, director of marketing for the Georgia Peach Council. A freeze earlier this month has contributed to the unpredictable nature of this year’s season. Because it often takes peaches a while to show whether they will make it through low temperatures, McGehee said growers are still assessing the damage from the freeze that hit the state 10 days ago. As far as volume of fruit, there are still some unknowns about this year’s crop.

“There are going to be plentiful Georgia peaches in July and the first part of August,” said McGehee. “At this time, the crop in May looks to be light and the crop in June is still being assessed.” He added that prices at the beginning of the season are expected to be higher than normal, with demand at an all-time high.

For more information:

Will McGehee

The Georgia Peach Council

+1 478 822 9210

FreshPlaza.com

Georgia peach growers keeping close eye on crop

TGF-FruitImageGeorgia peach growers keeping close eye on cropCold weather, including overnight freezes in north Georgia this week, has the potential to damage the peach crop, but at least one farm in our area seems to be doing fine.

Drew Echols with Jaemor Farms in Lula said the windy night Tuesday actually did their peaches a favour. “When those winds tapered off, we ran our wind machines and picked up a couple of degrees. Our crops this (Wednesday) morning looked pretty darn good.”

Echols said the temperatures were supposed to be a bit warmer Thursday morning, but there’s no strong wind in the forecast. Despite a few dead peaches, the 70-acre Lula-area crop was still holding strong.

Echols said peaches in South Georgia are facing a harder time. He spoke with another farmer in Fort Valley Wednesday. “There’s a little bit of damage, and the reason that they have some damage is because those peaches are already out of the shucks, what we call the shuck. It’s basically just a little naked peach sitting there,” Echols said.

As for the peaches at Jaemor, they still have some shucks and flowers, giving them more protection, according to Echols, but he still hopes for warmer overnights soon.

Source: accessnorthga.com

Publication date: 3/28/2014

 

FreshPlaza.com

Georgia peach growers anticipating a good harvest

Georgia peach growers anticipating a good harvest

Peach trees at Lawson Peaches in Brooks County, GA are now in bloom, and work continues to get the crop ready for harvest.

“We hope we have no more sub-freezing temperatures,” said Irvin Lawson, Owner and Operator of Lawson Peaches. “We don’t want to lose ‘em like we did last year when it got down to 26 on March the fifth.”

Peach growers fell short of their ideal number of 800 chill hours, but the cold winter still provided them with enough for what they expect to be a plentiful harvest.

“We’re expecting a good crop…we ended up, February 28th with 752 hours. That makes just about everything we’ve got,” Lawson explained.

Now that the trees have bloomed, the crop is more vulnerable to cold temperatures. But Lawson says based on how the crop handled last week’s cold temperatures, he’s not worried.

“Last week when we got down to 29 degrees, most everyone of ‘em came through okay,” Lawson happily pointed out.

As long as the temperatures stay above freezing for the rest of the season, everything will be just peachy.

Source: walb.com

Publication date: 3/5/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Peach and nectarine export volumes in 2013 reached 736,474 tonnes; 18% more than in 2012. In terms of value, the exports made a total of 756 million Euro; a 20% increase. Peach export volumes totalled 334,865 tonnes (+20.75%), while nectarines reached 401,809 tonnes (+15.43%).

Growth was a lot greater during the months of April (+300%) and May (+60%), as well as by the end of the campaign, with a 25% growth in October. Regarding export prices, the average for peaches dropped by 5.02%, while that of nectarines increased by 6.85%.

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Peach and nectarine export volumes in 2013 reached 736,474 tonnes; 18% more than in 2012. In terms of value, the exports made a total of 756 million Euro; a 20% increase. Peach export volumes totalled 334,865 tonnes (+20.75%), while nectarines reached 401,809 tonnes (+15.43%).

Growth was a lot greater during the months of April (+300%) and May (+60%), as well as by the end of the campaign, with a 25% growth in October. Regarding export prices, the average for peaches dropped by 5.02%, while that of nectarines increased by 6.85%.

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Peach and nectarine export volumes in 2013 reached 736,474 tonnes; 18% more than in 2012. In terms of value, the exports made a total of 756 million Euro; a 20% increase. Peach export volumes totalled 334,865 tonnes (+20.75%), while nectarines reached 401,809 tonnes (+15.43%).

Growth was a lot greater during the months of April (+300%) and May (+60%), as well as by the end of the campaign, with a 25% growth in October. Regarding export prices, the average for peaches dropped by 5.02%, while that of nectarines increased by 6.85%.

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Spain: Good peach and nectarine export campaign in 2013

Peach and nectarine export volumes in 2013 reached 736,474 tonnes; 18% more than in 2012. In terms of value, the exports made a total of 756 million Euro; a 20% increase. Peach export volumes totalled 334,865 tonnes (+20.75%), while nectarines reached 401,809 tonnes (+15.43%).

Growth was a lot greater during the months of April (+300%) and May (+60%), as well as by the end of the campaign, with a 25% growth in October. Regarding export prices, the average for peaches dropped by 5.02%, while that of nectarines increased by 6.85%.

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com