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Bar S recalls chicken and pork products including franks and corn dogs

The Altus, OK-based Bar-S Foods Company, late Tuesday recalled approximately 372,684 pounds of chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

The ready-to-eat, chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog items were produced on July 10, 11, 12, and 13, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • BarSfranklabel_406x25016-oz/1-lb. packages of “BAR-S Classic BUN LENGTH Franks MADE WITH CHICKEN, PORK ADDED” with “Use By” date of 10/11/2016 and case code 209.
  • 12-oz. packages of “BAR-S CLASSIC Franks MADE WITH CHICKEN, PORK ADDED” with package code 6338, “Use By” date of 10/10/2016 and case code 6405.
  • 24-oz./1.5-lb. cartons of “SIGNATURE Pick 5 CORNDOGS – 8 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with a “Use By” date of 4/6/2017 and case code 6071.
  • 42.72-oz./2.67-lb. cartons of “BAR-S CLASSIC CORN DOGS – 16 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with “Use By” dates of 4/7/2017 and 4/8/2017 and case code 6396.
  • 48-oz./3-lb. cartons of “BAR-S CLASSIC CORN DOGS – 16 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with package code 14054, “Use By” dates of 4/6/2017 and 4/9/2017, and case code 14038.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-81A” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

Bar-S Foods notified FSIS’ Dallas District Office earlier on July 19, 2016, of its intention to recall five chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog products that could potentially be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The company has not received test results for Listeria monocytogenes in connection with the recalled products, but due to recurring Listeria species issues at the firm, it has decided to remove the products from commerce as a precautionary measure. There have been no confirmed reports of illnesses or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS and Bar S are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website.

 

Food Safety News

Seattle Salmonella victims ate pork from Kapowsin Meats

Eleven people who attended a July 3 event in Seattle and ate pork provided by Kapowsin Meats became sick and health officials say they have laboratory evidence linking them to a Salmonella outbreak in 2015 that sickened almost 200 people and was traced to pork from Kapowsin Meats.

The Good Vibe Tribe Luau July 3 included pork from Kapowsin Meats, which was linked to a five-state Salmonella outbreak in 2015 that sickened 192 and resulted in a recall of more than 115,000 pounds of whole pigs.

The Good Vibe Tribe Luau July 3 included pork from Kapowsin Meats, which was linked to a five-state Salmonella outbreak in 2015 that sickened 192 and resulted in a recall of more than 115,000 pounds of whole pigs.

“We know that the pork served at the luau was supplied by Kapowsin Meats, and we know that everyone who got sick after the luau had eaten the pork that was served there. We also know that the genetic fingerprints of cases in this outbreak match the fingerprint of the Salmonella outbreak cases from last year,” according to a Tuesday afternoon update from Public Health of Seattle and King County.

The five-month, five state outbreak in 2015 sickened 192 people, with 30 having symptoms so severe they required hospitalization, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In August 2015 Kapowsin Meats of Graham, WA, recalled more than 115,000 pounds of whole hogs in connection with the outbreak of Salmonella I 4, [5],12:i:-and Salmonella Infantis.

The current outbreak is among attendees of the July 3 Good Vibe Tribe Luau. As of Tuesday, six people had been confirmed with Salmonella infections. Five others had symptoms consistent with Salmonella infection but were not tested, according to public health officials. All reported eating pork at the event, however no foods have been ruled out as possible sources.

“If you or a family member attended this event, even if you did not get ill, please take a few minutes to complete (this) survey. Comparing food histories between those who became ill and those who did not can help us determine what might have caused illness and prevent others from becoming sick,” public health officials said in an investigation summary posted Monday.

“The typical incubation period (the) time between exposure to the bacteria and symptom onset for Salmonella is one to five days, so if you attended the event and have not yet developed symptoms, it is unlikely you will become ill.”

Public Health of Seattle & King County reported food for the event was catered by Mojito, 7545 Lake City Way NE. Inspectors from the department checked the facility July 13 and inquired about food sources and preparation methods.

“Understanding where food came from and how it was prepared allows health officials to determine how food might have made people ill and, if necessary, to trace back to the food’s point of origin if specific food items are suspected,” according to the outbreak investigation summary.

This photo was posted on the Good Vibe Tribe Facebook page July 3.

This photo of roasting whole pigs was posted on the Good Vibe Tribe Facebook page July 3.

Good Vibe Tribe is a “non-profit organization that utilizes our social reach by creating unique events that bring people together to produce positive change,” according to the group’s Facebook page. According to the page, 2,900 people were invited to the July 3 event at Golden Gardens Park.

Public health officials reported receiving initial Salmonella case reports for the current outbreak on July 11, 12 and 15.

Salmonella infection is often spread through the fecal-oral route, through contaminated food and water, or through contact with animals and their environments, according to public health officials. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea that is often bloody, headache, fever, chills and abdominal cramping. Illness typically lasts several days and people can spread infection to others even after symptoms resolve.

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Food Safety News

Recall: Pork DNA Found in Cadbury Chocolate in Malaysia

If you’re an international snack-manufacturing company making chocolate for a largely Muslim population, the last thing you need is to have your product testing positive for even traces of pork DNA.

But that’s the situation Cadbury Malaysia, a unit of Mondelez International Inc., finds itself dealing with now. Recalls of Cadbury Dairy Milk Hazelnut and Cadbury Milk Roast Almond, sold in stores throughout Malaysia, have been ordered.

Pork DNA traces were found in the products by the county’s Ministry of Health during a periodic check for non-Halal ingredients. Two of three samples were reportedly positive for the pork DNA traces.

Most Malaysian food manufacturers use only Halal ingredients because more than 50 percent of the country’s population is Muslim and producers want to adhere to their religious restrictions, which entirely exclude pork.

Cadbury Malaysia is reportedly conducting a full review of its supply chain, with a goal of meeting Halal standards. Its parent company manufactures and markets food and beverage products for consumers in approximately 165 countries.

Mondelez International’s portfolio of nine brands includes Oreo, Nabisco and LU biscuits; Milka, Cadbury Dairy Milk and Cadbury chocolates; Trident gum; Jacobs coffee, and Tang powdered beverage. The company operates in 80 countries in these divisions: Latin America, Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa, Europe and North America.

Food Safety News

Recall: Pork DNA Found in Cadbury Chocolate in Malaysia

If you’re an international snack-manufacturing company making chocolate for a largely Muslim population, the last thing you need is to have your product testing positive for even traces of pork DNA.

But that’s the situation Cadbury Malaysia, a unit of Mondelez International Inc., finds itself dealing with now. Recalls of Cadbury Dairy Milk Hazelnut and Cadbury Milk Roast Almond, sold in stores throughout Malaysia, have been ordered.

Pork DNA traces were found in the products by the county’s Ministry of Health during a periodic check for non-Halal ingredients. Two of three samples were reportedly positive for the pork DNA traces.

Most Malaysian food manufacturers use only Halal ingredients because more than 50 percent of the country’s population is Muslim and producers want to adhere to their religious restrictions, which entirely exclude pork.

Cadbury Malaysia is reportedly conducting a full review of its supply chain, with a goal of meeting Halal standards. Its parent company manufactures and markets food and beverage products for consumers in approximately 165 countries.

Mondelez International’s portfolio of nine brands includes Oreo, Nabisco and LU biscuits; Milka, Cadbury Dairy Milk and Cadbury chocolates; Trident gum; Jacobs coffee, and Tang powdered beverage. The company operates in 80 countries in these divisions: Latin America, Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa, Europe and North America.

Food Safety News

Recall: Pork DNA Found in Cadbury Chocolate in Malaysia

If you’re an international snack-manufacturing company making chocolate for a largely Muslim population, the last thing you need is to have your product testing positive for even traces of pork DNA.

But that’s the situation Cadbury Malaysia, a unit of Mondelez International Inc., finds itself dealing with now. Recalls of Cadbury Dairy Milk Hazelnut and Cadbury Milk Roast Almond, sold in stores throughout Malaysia, have been ordered.

Pork DNA traces were found in the products by the county’s Ministry of Health during a periodic check for non-Halal ingredients. Two of three samples were reportedly positive for the pork DNA traces.

Most Malaysian food manufacturers use only Halal ingredients because more than 50 percent of the country’s population is Muslim and producers want to adhere to their religious restrictions, which entirely exclude pork.

Cadbury Malaysia is reportedly conducting a full review of its supply chain, with a goal of meeting Halal standards. Its parent company manufactures and markets food and beverage products for consumers in approximately 165 countries.

Mondelez International’s portfolio of nine brands includes Oreo, Nabisco and LU biscuits; Milka, Cadbury Dairy Milk and Cadbury chocolates; Trident gum; Jacobs coffee, and Tang powdered beverage. The company operates in 80 countries in these divisions: Latin America, Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa, Europe and North America.

Food Safety News

Recall: \Pork and Poultry Being Sold Without USDA Inspection

New York-based Transatlantic Foods Inc. late Friday recalled approximately 222,000 pounds of pork and poultry products that was not inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The recall stems from an anonymous tip about the company’s practices that was investigated by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

FSIS announced the recall action. It’s too early to know if there will be any illnesses from the recalled meat products.

Transatlantic operates two establishments — one in Scranton, PA, and one in Andover, NJ. FSIS said the recall is underway because the Andover establishment had not been issued a “Grant of Inspection” by the agency.

Without the Grant of Inspection, FSIS inspection program personnel were not assigned to the establishment. However, the investigation found the Andover establishment was producing product and using labels approved for use by, and bearing the establishment number of, the Scranton facility.

Products produced without inspection are considered unfit for human consumption and must be recalled. In addition, products were produced in undisclosed locations without the benefit of inspection. The products subject to recall include:

Duck fat

  • 7-oz. tubs of “Aux Delices des Bois Natural Duck Fat” with package code (T-001 through 365; H-001 through 365; or F-001 through 136)

Bacon

  • 10-oz. packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Artisanal Uncured Bacon Herbes de Provence Uncured Bacon” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • 10-oz. packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Artisanal Uncured Bacon Farmhouse Country Uncured Bacon” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • 10-oz. packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Artisanal Uncured Bacon Southwestern Style Uncured Bacon” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • 10-oz. packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Artisanal Uncured Bacon Pepper & Garlic Uncured Bacon” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)

Fresh Sausage

  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Breakfast Sage Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Breakfast Sage Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Brooklyn Lager Cheddar Bratwurst” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Brooklyn Lager Cheddar Bratwurst” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Pork Brooklyn Bratwurst” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Pork Brooklyn Bratwurst” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chorizo Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chorizo Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Irish Banger Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Pork & Broccoli Rabe Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Pork & Broccoli Rabe Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Cheese & Parsley Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Cheese & Parsley Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Pork & Smokey Bacon Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Pork & Smokey Uncured Bacon Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Hot Italian Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Hot Italian Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Sweet Italian Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Sweet Italian Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Fresh Kielbasa” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chicken Breakfast Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chicken Breakfast Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chipotle Honey Flavored Chicken Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chipotle Honey Flavored Chicken Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chicken Spinach & Feta Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chicken Spinach & Feta Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Buffalo Style Chicken Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Buffalo Style Chicken Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Turkey Breakfast Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chicken Marsala & Mushrooms Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chicken Marsala & Mushrooms Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Aux Delices des Bois Chicken Apple Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)
  • various weight packages of “Chestnut Valley Chicken Apple Sausage” with package code (T-001 through 365 or H-001 through 290)

The duck fat included in the recall was produced from January 2012 through May 2014 and bears the establishment number “P-39954.” The remaining products were produced prior to Oct. 18, 2013, and bear the establishment number “Est. 33806” or “Est. 45100,” “P-33806” or “P-45100” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection.

These products were shipped to retail, Internet and wholesale locations nationwide. FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Food Safety News

Lost Beef and Pork Sales to Russia Over Ractopamine Costing Just Millions, Not Billions

The ban on U.S. pork and beef exports to Russia over ractopamine is costly for American producers, but not so much as was recently reported by the U.S. Ambassador to Moscow.

U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul told a Moscow business newspaper the year old ban had cost America’s pork and beef industries $ 4 to $ 5 billion.  The ban on the feed additive used in the U.S. has cost American producers about $ 4 to $ 5 million, and Ambassador McFaul quickly acknowledged the mistake without saying how it came about.

Ractopamine is a growth additive that results in more lean meat production. While world regulatory bodies have set safe levels for its use, numerous countries have banned the substance.

McFaul, who grew up in Montana, has been U.S. Ambassador to Russia for two years and is going through a new round of attention from Moscow’s media. In addition explaining the U.S. interest in exporting pork and beef to Russia, the Ambassador has been talking about the need to curb Iran’s nuclear ambitions, destroy Syria’s chemical weapons and getting cargo into and out of Afghanistan.  McFaul went to Moscow as Ambassador directly from the White House, where he was Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Russia and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

The international Codex Alimentarius Commission set safe limits for residual ractopamine in meats in July 2012, but Russia went ahead with its December 2012 announcement of the ban. McFaul said U.S. pork and beef actually stopped entering Russia in February 2013. While the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives and 27 other regulatory authorities around the world concur with the safe levels for the growth additive that produces leaner meat, China and the European Union have also banned ractopamine.

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Missouri Meat Processor Recalls Beef and Pork Products for Possible E. Coli

Cloud’s Meats, Inc., of Carthage, MO, is voluntarily recalling beef and pork products that may possibly be contaminated with E. coli after positive test results in samples of items produced in mid-November.

According to a Dec. 2 news release, the samples were taken during routine testing conducted by the Missouri Department of Agriculture’s Meat and Poultry Inspection Program on Nov. 14 and analyzed by the Department’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Springfield.

The Jasper County meat processor is voluntarily recalling approximately 1,450 pounds of meat, including ground beef and pork, sausage and steaks. The recalled products are marked with the code “318” and labeled with Clouds Meats Inc. or Cloud’s Smoked Meats.

Recalled items include 1,052 pounds of ground beef, 158 pounds of pork sausage, 152 pounds of ground pork, and 96 pounds of tenderized minute steak and tenderized round steak.

Company records indicate that the products were not listed as distributed for retail sale. However, anyone who may have the products listed above should return any unused portion to the business at 2013 S. Paradise Lane in Carthage.

Anyone concerned about an illness should contact their health-care provider.

Food contaminated with E. coli may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps, and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis, or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases, the illness can be fatal.

Food Safety News

Missouri Meat Processor Recalls Beef and Pork Products for Possible E. Coli

Cloud’s Meats, Inc., of Carthage, MO, is voluntarily recalling beef and pork products that may possibly be contaminated with E. coli after positive test results in samples of items produced in mid-November.

According to a Dec. 2 news release, the samples were taken during routine testing conducted by the Missouri Department of Agriculture’s Meat and Poultry Inspection Program on Nov. 14 and analyzed by the Department’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Springfield.

The Jasper County meat processor is voluntarily recalling approximately 1,450 pounds of meat, including ground beef and pork, sausage and steaks. The recalled products are marked with the code “318” and labeled with Clouds Meats Inc. or Cloud’s Smoked Meats.

Recalled items include 1,052 pounds of ground beef, 158 pounds of pork sausage, 152 pounds of ground pork, and 96 pounds of tenderized minute steak and tenderized round steak.

Company records indicate that the products were not listed as distributed for retail sale. However, anyone who may have the products listed above should return any unused portion to the business at 2013 S. Paradise Lane in Carthage.

Anyone concerned about an illness should contact their health-care provider.

Food contaminated with E. coli may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps, and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis, or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases, the illness can be fatal.

Food Safety News

Misbranding, Undeclared Allergen Prompt Westlake Foods Recall of Cured Pork Products

Westlake Foods of Santa Ana, CA, has recalled more than 47,000 pounds of cured pork products due to misbranding and an undeclared allergen. The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Friday that the products contain wheat, a known allergen not declared on the product labels.

The products subject to recall include:

  • 11-lb. to 13-lb. cases of “Tay Ho Cured Pork Artificially Colored.” This product was distributed for institutional use nationwide.
  • 14-oz. packages of “Tay Ho Cured Pork Sausage With Pork Ears And Snouts.” This product was distributed for retail sales nationwide.
  • 11-lb. to 13-lb. cases of “Don Café Cured Pork Meat and Binder Product Pork skin added.” This product was distributed for institutional use in the Houston area.

The products bear the establishment number “EST. 1627A” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection. They can be further identified by a case code “233001” through “213234.” All products were produced between Jan. 1, 2013, and Aug. 22, 2013.

The problem was discovered by an FSIS inspector during a routine label review. The problem is believed to have occurred due to a change in the company’s spice mix, which was not reflected on the products’ labels.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

 

Food Safety News

Misbranding, Undeclared Allergen Prompt Westlake Foods Recall of Cured Pork Products

Westlake Foods of Santa Ana, CA, has recalled more than 47,000 pounds of cured pork products due to misbranding and an undeclared allergen. The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Friday that the products contain wheat, a known allergen not declared on the product labels.

The products subject to recall include:

  • 11-lb. to 13-lb. cases of “Tay Ho Cured Pork Artificially Colored.” This product was distributed for institutional use nationwide.
  • 14-oz. packages of “Tay Ho Cured Pork Sausage With Pork Ears And Snouts.” This product was distributed for retail sales nationwide.
  • 11-lb. to 13-lb. cases of “Don Café Cured Pork Meat and Binder Product Pork skin added.” This product was distributed for institutional use in the Houston area.

The products bear the establishment number “EST. 1627A” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection. They can be further identified by a case code “233001” through “213234.” All products were produced between Jan. 1, 2013, and Aug. 22, 2013.

The problem was discovered by an FSIS inspector during a routine label review. The problem is believed to have occurred due to a change in the company’s spice mix, which was not reflected on the products’ labels.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

 

Food Safety News