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Port of Savannah’s role strengthened by new PortFresh Logistics facility

The opening of PortFresh Logistics during the early fourth quarter of 2016 will strengthen the role the Port of Savannah in Georgia will play as an entry point for fresh produce originating in South America.

PortFresh Logistics is constructing a 100,000-square-foot cold-treatment facility dedicated to perishable cargoes.

“Our services will include cold storage, drayage, inspection — both USDA and in-house — full repacking and regarding capability, pre-cooling, import and export cross dock, on-site U.S. customs stations, third-party food certification, organic handling certification, grower services including sales, inspection and logistics, regional LTL services, fumigation services in partnership with Royal Fumigation, CTPAT and more,” Todd Huber, the company’s vice president of operations, told The Produce News.

PortFreshLogisticsPortFresh Logistics plans to open its new facility in the early third quarter of the year. The 100,000-square-foot cold-treatment facility will provide customers with a variety of services for perishable cargoes. Working with the Port of Savannah in Georgia, the facility is expected to create an additional entry point for fresh produce originating in South America. Photo courtesy of PortFresh Logistics.“Perishable foods are an important growth sector for the Georgia Ports Authority,” said Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Port Authority.

PortFresh Logistics will create 40 new jobs upon its opening. That number is expected to increase to 75 full-time jobs by the fourth year of operation. The company will be led by Chief Executive Officer Brian Kastick and President Rebecca George.

Kastick provided some analysis of the role PortFresh Logistics will play to facilitate the distribution of perishables in the Southeast Corridor. “Currently, more than 90 percent of imported fruits and vegetables entering the U.S. East Coast arrive via Northeast ports,” he said. “That means cargo headed to the Southeast must be trucked down, adding time and expense to the logistics supply chain.

“Using the Port of Savannah offers significant time and money savings per container for areas throughout the Southeast region,” Kastick continued. “We believe the growing population of the U.S. Southeast, government policy changes and perishable industry consolidation will break open significant pent-up demand for the new perishable supply chain gateway built around the Port of Savannah.”

The PortFresh’s state-of-the-art facility will be situated on 20 acres of a 182-acre site specifically designed to allow multiple climate zones. Both import and export cargo will be handled. The facility is located on I-16 on Old River Road, seven miles from I-95 and 15 miles from the Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal.

“Savannah is the fourth largest port in the U.S., with the Garden City Terminal being the largest single-terminal container operation,” Huber said. “The proximity of both PortFresh and Garden City to I-95 and I-16 allows for fast terminal truck turnaround. Combining that with lower fees and drayage costs will make this an ideal marriage for importing perishable cargo into the Port of Savannah. On the outbound side, Savannah has an ideal distribution footprint. The proximity to South and Midwest hubs that supply over 40 percent of U.S. consumers is reached better through the Port of Savannah than any major port along the East Coast.”

Huber added that domestic shippers will be able to realize advantages by utilizing the company’s storage and repacking services. “Also, CSX and Norfolk Southern both offer rail service to Garden City Terminal allowing our western U.S. shippers to come East at very competitive rates,” he said.

Huber said PortFresh Logistics will raise the bar on customer service. “Our hours of operation will revolve around customer satisfaction,” he said. “Our customers drive our business. They entrust their product to us. We will do everything possible to satisfy their needs and continually grow that trust.”

Negotiations to bring the project to fruition occurred over a three-year period. A grant from OneGeorgia Equity helped PortFresh defray infrastructure costs for water and sewer lines to the site.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Port strikes upset market balance

Washington apple exporter hopeful
Port strikes upset market balance

Port problems in the West are changing the market situation. Some fruit that was targeted for export to the Far East is being pulled back and sold in North American markets.

“Some of the fruit that we have targeted to the Far East is being redirected into North American markets. We are hearing of a meeting this week on the port status and are hopeful for an agreement,” says Howard Nager from Domex Superfresh Growers. The timing of this slowdown has been unfortunate as November and December are some of the busiest times of the year.

However with a record crop Washington growers and shippers can provide more options and flexibility to retailers and consumers. “Because of the heavy volumes and vintage crop of Washington apples, we will be able deliver our customers greater volumes and greater promotional opportunities for a longer period of time, so they might not have to shift to Southern Hemisphere apples at all.” says Howard Nager of Domex Superfresh Growers.

“In New York the growers did not have  a record crop this year, but a very high quality crop,”says James Allen from New York Apple Association. “The volume from  Washington has put some pressure on the prices, and now the port problems are causing exports to back up. This gives our shippers some extra challenges.”

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US (WA): Port dispute slows apple exports

A large apple crop in Washington means that the state’s growers will look to export a big portion of their crop this season. But a labour dispute between port operators and longshoreman has slowed the handling of containers through the ports, and could potentially lead to supply gaps for countries in Central America, South America and Asia, where Washington fruit is sent this time of year.

“The situation is a huge mess,” said Randy Steensma of Honey Bear Tree Fruit. “We’ve got containers full of apples that have been sitting at the port for a week because they haven’t been loaded yet. If things are running normally, the vessel is loaded and gone in 72 hours.” Refrigerated containers and the high quality nature of fruit destined for export means that apples in limbo at the port likely won’t spoil, but the delay in getting fruit out quickly could lead to supply gaps in some markets abroad.

“Buyers book on a weekly basis, so they will miss a week or two,” said Steensma. “We ship to Colombia, Honduras and Panama, so there will be gaps there, and also in some Asian markets, like Hong Kong, India and Jakarta, which is a big destination for us right now.” Shippers are hoping for a quick resolution to the labour dispute, which has intensified as the Pacific Maritime Association and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union have tried to agree on a new contract. The spillover from those negotiations has resulted in delays at the port. Though a resolution is urgently sought because of the broad commerce ramifications, Washington’s apple growers, who are sitting on a large crop, have been counting more on exports this year than in previous years.

“In a normal year, about a third of the state’s apple crop goes overseas,” explained Rebecca Lyons, international marketing director for the Washington Apple Commission. “However, this year, with the large crop we have and with the large apple crops in other states, we’re thinking upwards of 50 percent of our crop will have to go to export.” Up to now, Washington was on course to have a strong export season, with the state’s apple exports up 50 percent over the previous year. The state’s growers also gained direct access to China for their Red and Golden Delicious varieties, but the port problems haven’t allowed growers to fully take advantage of that.

“This is a big issue, not just for us, but for others as well,” said Lyons. “We just hope this will be quickly resolved.”

FreshPlaza.com

Costa Rican banana industry cries foul over port strike

Costa Rican banana industry cries foul over port strike

Costa Rica’s National Banana Corporation (Corbana) has called on representatives of the JAPDEVA Workers’ Syndicate (SINTRAJAP) to put an end to strikes in the ports of Limón.

In a release, Corbana said the situation – which reportedly has been alleviated somewhat through the emergency hiring of foreign workers – put the salaries of 40,000 banana workers at risk.

“It is unfortunate that these situations happen – not only is the agricultural industry affected, but also the image of our country for not complying with previously established contracts,” Corbana manager Jorge Sauma said.

“From Corbana we’re calling out to representatives of SINTRAJAP that negotiations are not resolved by creating more conflict, that dialogue is necessary. This country needs to generate more work and the banana industry offers a lot of opportunities, however these confrontations enter the development of the province.

In the release, the organization highlighted that if bananas could not be shipped, costs increased for refrigeration or product was lost due to its perishable nature.

Corbana added that a “small group cannot kidnap the development of a nation for special interests”.

Source: www.freshfruitportal.com

Publication date: 10/24/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Chilean port legislation could slash productivity

Chilean port legislation could slash productivity

Chile’s so-called ‘Short law on ports’ could cut productivity by around 20%, according to Francesco Schiaffino, general manager of Valparaiso box handling facility Terminal Pacífico Sur (TPS).

The law, currently going through parliament, proposes a synchronisation of rest periods at all national ports. TPS wants these agreements to be made individually and based on the needs of each facility.

Mr Schiaffino claims this could have a $ 4bn impact on Chile’s economy due to lost working time.

The law could also cut income by around 46%, he claims, amounting to approximately $ 62.4m per year for terminal operators. This will come about from changes to the economic contribution tax paid by companies, which is levied on per ton of cargo handled, although regarded by most as an additional tax.

Previously, this was levied at a standard rate of $ 0.30 per ton of freight, but would be lowered to $ 0.20 per ton of general cargo and $ 0.10 per ton of dry or liquid bulk. Were this to become law, this would see revenue raised by this ‘tax’ in 2015-2018 drop to $ 15.6m per year based on annual volumes of 120m tons.

Source: www.portstrategy.com

Publication date: 8/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.