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Unusual host preference of a moth species could be useful for biological control

A team of Iranian researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran have discovered that Gynnodomorpha permixtana, a well-known moth species from Europe and Asia, has changed its host preferences in order to adjust to Iran’s northern region environmental conditions. The importance of this adaptation for biological control of problematic weeds in rice fields and the biology of the moth on new host plant have been described in the open access journal Nota Lepidopterologica.

The larvae of G. permixtana have been so far reported to feed on the seeds and flowers of plant species such as water-plantain, eyebright, lousewort, bitter root and European yellow-rattle, which are weeds commonly present across Europe and Asia. A new study of the populations in northern Iran, however has revealed a new host — Sagittaria trifolia, commonly known as arrowhead.

This new discovery suggests that climatic and environmental conditions in northern regions of Iran resulted in the choice of a new new host plant, and provides an exciting insight into how adaptation mechanisms work.

Arrowheads are groups of problematic perennial broadleaf weeds that thrive in rice fields and waterways. Favorable climatic condition after rice harvesting results in continued activity and thriving populations throughout the year.

The economic importance of this weed has prompted researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran to seek for possible solutions for the management of arrowhead. Their studies have revealed that the larvae of a certain moth species feeding on the fruits and seeds of the problematic weed, can lead to a dramatic decrease of its germination potential.

After this discovery the moth was sent for identification to Dr Leif Aarvik from the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, who have diagnosed the species as the commonly known G. permixtana, which was in this case demonstrating a very uncommon host preference.

‘To our surprise, it looks like this moth chose new host plant in Iran. This moth was reported in 2009 from the northern regions of the country, but its host plant was unknown. Its usual host plants, such as water-plantain, also grow in Iran but peculiarly we couldn’t find its damage symptoms on them. That made this moth host range and biology in Iran rather mysterious at that point, and the recent discovery of arrowheads as its preferred host in the region brings even more peculiarity in the story.’ commented the lead author of the study Atousa Farahpour Haghani a Phd student from, Rice Research Institute of Iran.

‘Many factors can possibly influence host plant choice including food quality and quantity, climatic conditions, synchronization, physiological conditions in both insect and food plant, genetic modifications etc. Some of these factors are not stable and change in different environmental conditions, so an insect can change its choice of food plant on the basis of seeking the most beneficial complex of factors. It seems that in the northern regions of Iran, and luckily for rice crops, the problematic arrowheads present the best choice for G. permixtana.’ added Haghani.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Unusual host preference of a moth species could be useful for biological control

A team of Iranian researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran have discovered that Gynnodomorpha permixtana, a well-known moth species from Europe and Asia, has changed its host preferences in order to adjust to Iran’s northern region environmental conditions. The importance of this adaptation for biological control of problematic weeds in rice fields and the biology of the moth on new host plant have been described in the open access journal Nota Lepidopterologica.

The larvae of G. permixtana have been so far reported to feed on the seeds and flowers of plant species such as water-plantain, eyebright, lousewort, bitter root and European yellow-rattle, which are weeds commonly present across Europe and Asia. A new study of the populations in northern Iran, however has revealed a new host — Sagittaria trifolia, commonly known as arrowhead.

This new discovery suggests that climatic and environmental conditions in northern regions of Iran resulted in the choice of a new new host plant, and provides an exciting insight into how adaptation mechanisms work.

Arrowheads are groups of problematic perennial broadleaf weeds that thrive in rice fields and waterways. Favorable climatic condition after rice harvesting results in continued activity and thriving populations throughout the year.

The economic importance of this weed has prompted researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran to seek for possible solutions for the management of arrowhead. Their studies have revealed that the larvae of a certain moth species feeding on the fruits and seeds of the problematic weed, can lead to a dramatic decrease of its germination potential.

After this discovery the moth was sent for identification to Dr Leif Aarvik from the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, who have diagnosed the species as the commonly known G. permixtana, which was in this case demonstrating a very uncommon host preference.

‘To our surprise, it looks like this moth chose new host plant in Iran. This moth was reported in 2009 from the northern regions of the country, but its host plant was unknown. Its usual host plants, such as water-plantain, also grow in Iran but peculiarly we couldn’t find its damage symptoms on them. That made this moth host range and biology in Iran rather mysterious at that point, and the recent discovery of arrowheads as its preferred host in the region brings even more peculiarity in the story.’ commented the lead author of the study Atousa Farahpour Haghani a Phd student from, Rice Research Institute of Iran.

‘Many factors can possibly influence host plant choice including food quality and quantity, climatic conditions, synchronization, physiological conditions in both insect and food plant, genetic modifications etc. Some of these factors are not stable and change in different environmental conditions, so an insect can change its choice of food plant on the basis of seeking the most beneficial complex of factors. It seems that in the northern regions of Iran, and luckily for rice crops, the problematic arrowheads present the best choice for G. permixtana.’ added Haghani.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Unusual host preference of a moth species could be useful for biological control

A team of Iranian researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran have discovered that Gynnodomorpha permixtana, a well-known moth species from Europe and Asia, has changed its host preferences in order to adjust to Iran’s northern region environmental conditions. The importance of this adaptation for biological control of problematic weeds in rice fields and the biology of the moth on new host plant have been described in the open access journal Nota Lepidopterologica.

The larvae of G. permixtana have been so far reported to feed on the seeds and flowers of plant species such as water-plantain, eyebright, lousewort, bitter root and European yellow-rattle, which are weeds commonly present across Europe and Asia. A new study of the populations in northern Iran, however has revealed a new host — Sagittaria trifolia, commonly known as arrowhead.

This new discovery suggests that climatic and environmental conditions in northern regions of Iran resulted in the choice of a new new host plant, and provides an exciting insight into how adaptation mechanisms work.

Arrowheads are groups of problematic perennial broadleaf weeds that thrive in rice fields and waterways. Favorable climatic condition after rice harvesting results in continued activity and thriving populations throughout the year.

The economic importance of this weed has prompted researchers from the Rice Research Institute of Iran to seek for possible solutions for the management of arrowhead. Their studies have revealed that the larvae of a certain moth species feeding on the fruits and seeds of the problematic weed, can lead to a dramatic decrease of its germination potential.

After this discovery the moth was sent for identification to Dr Leif Aarvik from the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, who have diagnosed the species as the commonly known G. permixtana, which was in this case demonstrating a very uncommon host preference.

‘To our surprise, it looks like this moth chose new host plant in Iran. This moth was reported in 2009 from the northern regions of the country, but its host plant was unknown. Its usual host plants, such as water-plantain, also grow in Iran but peculiarly we couldn’t find its damage symptoms on them. That made this moth host range and biology in Iran rather mysterious at that point, and the recent discovery of arrowheads as its preferred host in the region brings even more peculiarity in the story.’ commented the lead author of the study Atousa Farahpour Haghani a Phd student from, Rice Research Institute of Iran.

‘Many factors can possibly influence host plant choice including food quality and quantity, climatic conditions, synchronization, physiological conditions in both insect and food plant, genetic modifications etc. Some of these factors are not stable and change in different environmental conditions, so an insect can change its choice of food plant on the basis of seeking the most beneficial complex of factors. It seems that in the northern regions of Iran, and luckily for rice crops, the problematic arrowheads present the best choice for G. permixtana.’ added Haghani.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

MountainKing looking to capitalize on consumer preference for smaller bags

New sales figures indicate when it comes to bagged fresh potatoes, smaller package sizes are starting to sell big.

Sales of bagged fresh potatoes under four pounds are up 17.8 percent from a year ago and 112 percent in the past 10 years, according to data from AC Nielson Fresh Facts.

MK-Small-Bags“These new figures illustrate why retailers need to re-think their bagged fresh potato merchandising strategies with a greater emphasis on smaller package sizes,” John Pope of Houston-based MountainKing Potatoes said in a press release. “They underscore what we’ve been seeing for quite some time – that consumers are buying in smaller quantities.”

Two key factors are contributing to the growth of smaller bagged potatoes, according to Pope. First, family sizes continue to shrink, with two thirds of all U.S. households currently under the age of 30 or over the age of 50. Second, the availability of online recipes has led shoppers to plan a meal at a time rather than buying for several meals, thereby increasing the average number of shopping visits per week. Consumers now average 2.2 shopping trips per week, the highest in 10 years.

While sales of the smaller package sizes continue to grow, so too are profits for grocers who merchandise the smaller packages, according to Pope.

Fresh potatoes in bags five pounds and larger offer an average ring per pound of 52 cents while the average ring per pound of potatoes in smaller bags is $ 1.52.

“Retailers who shift their merchandise to smaller pack sizes will realize significant profit improvement from their fresh potatoes,” Pope said in the press release.

MountainKing has made smaller package sizes a focus of its sales efforts to retailers. The company’s seven smaller package sizes include its four-count Steakhouse Bakers, three-pound Steakhouse Golds, 1.5-pound Steakhouse Roasters, three-pound Seafood B Reds, three-pound MountainKing Russets, three-pound MountainKing Reds and a 16-ounce package of the company’s Heat and Eat Gold Mashed. Each offers 8-10 servings to help households avoid waste.

MountainKing Potatoes is a leading grower of high-flavor potato varieties whose products reach 1 million U.S. households each week, according to the company.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.