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Total 2014 pipfruit volume shows some downturn from previous season

Alan Pollard, chief executive officer of Pipfruit New Zealand, said he expects total pipfruit production to come in at 308,078 tons in 2014. “This represents a reduction of 16,358 tons or 5 percent from the 2013 season,” he told The Produce News. Production acreage has remained virtually unchanged between the two seasons.

Pipfruit New Zealand is comprised of growers, packers and marketers of apples and pears. The association’s goals are guyAlan Pollardto develop and promote access to overseas markets; identify, undertake and fund research and development relating to the New Zealand pipfruit industry; speak on behalf of the New Zealand pipfruit industry and represent its interests; promote the development and exploitation of new plant varieties for members; and provide information and organize seminars, workshops and conferences for education and discussion of members.

In 2013, the United States was the second-largest export destination for pipfruit. “In the 2013 season, 38,065 tons of apples (of a total export volume of 319,791 tons) and 1,990 tons of pears (of a total export volume of 4,645 tons) were sent to the U.S.,” Pollard stated.

Looking at 2014 production, he went on to say, “Some regions saw some localized weather events. But in the main it was a very good growing season. The fruit size and quality of the 2014 crop is exceptional.”

Pollard said a total of 8,368 hectares were estimated to be in apple production this season. A total of 303,249 tons of apples are expected to be marketed in 2014, with a breakdown of tonnage by variety as follows: Braeburn/559,991; Royal Gala/99,395; Cox/4,150; Fuji/28,456; Granny Smith/8,188; Jazz/34,554; New Zealand Beauty/1,875; New Zealand Queen/12,055; New Zealand Rose/9,388; Cripps Pink/18,141; and other varieties/27,056.

“We are forecasting to export 4,827 tons of pears during the 2014 season,” Pollard continued. “This represents an increase of 182 tons or 4 percent over 2013.” Pear varieties produced and marketed include Taylors Gold, Packhams Triumph, Beurre Bosc and Doyenne du Comice. Chinese pears are also grown and exported.

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Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent protests by striking civil servants in Greece may remind some of similar manifestations in past years, but the fallout from these incidents has not impacted trade within the country like previous strikes did.


“We don’t really feel an impact from the strikes,” said George Frangistas from Gefra. “There have been a couple of reactions from growers and from transport companies, but in reality, there have been no side effects.” Frangistas was referring to the road blocks and sometimes violent altercations that sprang up on Greece’s roads in previous years. But, unlike in past years, where manifestations seriously hampered the transport of fresh produce within the country, this year’s activities have not been major. But that’s not to say growers and shippers haven’t had other issues to deal with.


“Greece is in dire straits,” said Frangista. “People are sad and depressed, so they don’t want to do anything, and I think that’s why nothing serious has happened at the moment.” Poor morale probably has to do with poor economic conditions, which, in turn, have made for low domestic demand for fresh produce. In fact, Frangista noted that most produce that’s grown in Greece heads directly for the export market because of sluggish demand at home.


“Our company is 100 percent exports, so we’re not affected by the domestic situation,” said Frangista. “We focus on the big European supermarkets, so we haven’t felt the effects of the crisis.” But he also warned that the export market has significant barriers to entry for those wishing to escape bad conditions at home. While there might be produce available in Greece, it’s hard to set up the packing houses and trade relationships necessary to successfully export goods. Even if those things can be attained, Frangista noted that Europe can be a tough market to crack because of the relatively few large clients.


“Most retailers go with central buying, so there are only about 10 supermarket groups, so you’re really trying to sell to the same ten people all over Europe,” said Frangista. “They will listen to us about citrus, because we are experts in citrus, but they won’t buy kiwis from us, for example, because they already have experts in kiwis they buy from. So, in the end, Europe is not so big a market.”

For more information:

George Frangistas
Gefra
Tel: +30-210-9636382
Fax: +30-210-9607092
Email: [email protected]
www.gefra.gr
 

Publication date: 3/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent protests by striking civil servants in Greece may remind some of similar manifestations in past years, but the fallout from these incidents has not impacted trade within the country like previous strikes did.


“We don’t really feel an impact from the strikes,” said George Frangistas from Gefra. “There have been a couple of reactions from growers and from transport companies, but in reality, there have been no side effects.” Frangistas was referring to the road blocks and sometimes violent altercations that sprang up on Greece’s roads in previous years. But, unlike in past years, where manifestations seriously hampered the transport of fresh produce within the country, this year’s activities have not been major. But that’s not to say growers and shippers haven’t had other issues to deal with.


“Greece is in dire straits,” said Frangista. “People are sad and depressed, so they don’t want to do anything, and I think that’s why nothing serious has happened at the moment.” Poor morale probably has to do with poor economic conditions, which, in turn, have made for low domestic demand for fresh produce. In fact, Frangista noted that most produce that’s grown in Greece heads directly for the export market because of sluggish demand at home.


“Our company is 100 percent exports, so we’re not affected by the domestic situation,” said Frangista. “We focus on the big European supermarkets, so we haven’t felt the effects of the crisis.” But he also warned that the export market has significant barriers to entry for those wishing to escape bad conditions at home. While there might be produce available in Greece, it’s hard to set up the packing houses and trade relationships necessary to successfully export goods. Even if those things can be attained, Frangista noted that Europe can be a tough market to crack because of the relatively few large clients.


“Most retailers go with central buying, so there are only about 10 supermarket groups, so you’re really trying to sell to the same ten people all over Europe,” said Frangista. “They will listen to us about citrus, because we are experts in citrus, but they won’t buy kiwis from us, for example, because they already have experts in kiwis they buy from. So, in the end, Europe is not so big a market.”

For more information:

George Frangistas
Gefra
Tel: +30-210-9636382
Fax: +30-210-9607092
Email: [email protected]
www.gefra.gr
 

Publication date: 3/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Pipfruit growers up $50 million to previous year

NZ: Pipfruit growers up $ 50 million to previous year

Good luck and good management have put $ 150 million in Nelson pipfruit growers’ pockets in the past year – up by a much needed $ 50 million on the previous year.

Tasman’s 5.25 million carton export crop from last summer went into relatively bare British markets, after competing international crops were battered by bad weather, and supplied strong, expanding Asian markets bolstered by population and income growth.

Pipfruit New Zealand chief executive Alan Pollard said that in addition, Kiwi growers’ attention to quality, a large 16.9 million carton national crop and international recognition that New Zealand apples and pears were a niche product saw apples and pears return the record $ 500m to the country.

He said there was no doubt bad weather experienced by Chilean and the United States growers had enabled New Zealand orchardists to land fruit in welcoming markets. “But I think more and more, New Zealand pipfruit is a seen as a niche product, rather than a commodity.”

This year’s strong return is not just a boon to growers who have experienced low to loss prices over the last five years, but will also have a positive impact on related rural communities, he said. “Hawke’s Bay received $ 350 million in export receipts, up $ 100 million on 2012 and Nelson has received $ 150 million, $ 50 million more than 2012. When you factor in the economic multiplier of these extra receipts, that represents a huge economic boost for provincial New Zealand,” Mr Pollard said.

“Most growers will be paying off debt,” he said. “One or two of the bigger growers will be buying more orchard and planting trees. Most growers will be planting a little bit – but nothing like what we saw five to seven years ago. Everyone is consolidating now.”

“Every grower I have talked to is feeling good about going forward and, touch wood, we’ve had no hail and some nice weather so far – it’s just magic.”

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Pipfruit growers up $50 million to previous year

NZ: Pipfruit growers up $ 50 million to previous year

Good luck and good management have put $ 150 million in Nelson pipfruit growers’ pockets in the past year – up by a much needed $ 50 million on the previous year.

Tasman’s 5.25 million carton export crop from last summer went into relatively bare British markets, after competing international crops were battered by bad weather, and supplied strong, expanding Asian markets bolstered by population and income growth.

Pipfruit New Zealand chief executive Alan Pollard said that in addition, Kiwi growers’ attention to quality, a large 16.9 million carton national crop and international recognition that New Zealand apples and pears were a niche product saw apples and pears return the record $ 500m to the country.

He said there was no doubt bad weather experienced by Chilean and the United States growers had enabled New Zealand orchardists to land fruit in welcoming markets. “But I think more and more, New Zealand pipfruit is a seen as a niche product, rather than a commodity.”

This year’s strong return is not just a boon to growers who have experienced low to loss prices over the last five years, but will also have a positive impact on related rural communities, he said. “Hawke’s Bay received $ 350 million in export receipts, up $ 100 million on 2012 and Nelson has received $ 150 million, $ 50 million more than 2012. When you factor in the economic multiplier of these extra receipts, that represents a huge economic boost for provincial New Zealand,” Mr Pollard said.

“Most growers will be paying off debt,” he said. “One or two of the bigger growers will be buying more orchard and planting trees. Most growers will be planting a little bit – but nothing like what we saw five to seven years ago. Everyone is consolidating now.”

“Every grower I have talked to is feeling good about going forward and, touch wood, we’ve had no hail and some nice weather so far – it’s just magic.”

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com