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USDA: Food Prices to Climb This Year

WASHINGTON — Total food prices this calendar year will rise 2.5% to 3.5%, according to a forecast just released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service.

Much of the rise will result from the delayed effects of last year’s drought in the Midwest.

Even though the drought was severe, destroying a huge amount of field crops, food prices remained flat during 2012.


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That’s because, while prices rose for beef and veal, poultry, fruit and other foods, those hikes were offset by drops in the price of pork, eggs, vegetables and nonalcoholic beverages. Other food categories remained flat.

Read more: Fresh Food Prices Set to Rise in 2013

In addition, while the drought ravaged corn and soybean crops, which does affect food prices, it typically takes months for commodity price changes to show themselves at retail, according to the ERS.

“Most of the impact of the drought is expected to be realized in 2013,” the ERS report states.

Not surprisingly, beef prices are already up 1.7% in May over last year in May. Conversely, a decline in exports and an increase in hog production have kept pork prices almost flat. In fact, May pork prices were down 0.2% from May a year ago.

USDA’s ERS bases its forecast on current conditions and inflation.

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Letter From the Editor: CA Law Likely to Increase Egg Prices, But What About Food Safety?

On Jan. 2, a new California law will require that shell eggs sold at retail in the state will come only from hens housed in larger cages, be they resident or non-resident hens. This change comes at a time when egg consumption and prices are both up to historic highs, an increase of 30-35 percent over this time last year.

The California experiment will likely create turmoil in egg markets and push prices higher in 2015. Californians might for a while even find egg counters empty.

The dirty little secret is that the California mandate will mean higher egg prices without buying much in the way of food safety. If we are going to up-end the egg industry with massively costly change, we might have done something more useful — such as invest in more pasteurized egg capacity. But food safety was not really part of the agenda for more elbow room for chickens.

California voters put the state’s egg producers on notice six years ago that, come Jan. 2, 2015, only eggs from hens in larger cages could be sold at retail in the state. Then, after hearing complaints about the disadvantage in-state producers would be under, the California Assembly amended the law to make it apply to out-of-state producers as well.

That was a first. Other states — Michigan, Oregon, and Washington — have adopted their own cage requirements, but only California is restricting trade from other states and foreign countries based on its rules for space requirements for chickens.

Before it took effect, opposing Midwestern egg-producing states were not getting much traction in federal court in California, but that may change once the market dislocation and higher egg prices kick in. Before the new mandate, California egg producers supplied only 1 in 3 eggs consumed in the state.

California consumers demand more eggs from somewhere, and there’s a lot of fog out there about whether enough caging capacity outside of California has been expanded to fulfill that demand within the new constraints of the law. Although they’ve been counting down the years to Jan. 2 since the initiative passed, the new California law does not seems to have had the required impact on how U.S. egg producers shelter their laying hens. And, as many as 95 percent of them might still use so-called battery-cage systems.

That figure might now be reversed within California. The mostly family-owned egg producers inside California have, in the past six years, made the capital investments to comply with Proposition 2 standards, which even they call “vague mandates on housing,” according to the Association of California Egg Farmers.

Changing out battery-cage infrastructure entirely in the U.S. would cost egg producers (or somebody) as much as $ 10 billion. The European Union move to so-called “enriched cages” became effective in 2012, although it is involved in litigation with about a dozen member states that have not gone along. EU producers reportedly spent more than $ 600 million on the changes.

Battery-cage infrastructure not only provides housing for the hens, but also are complex systems for feeding and watering, waste disposal, and collecting the eggs. Egg producers say battery cages help prevent disease and turn out cleaner eggs. Attempts to set a national standard for larger laying-hen cages failed both as standalone bills and as an inclusion to the 2014 Farm Bill.

My take is that, from a food-safety perspective, how cages are managed and operated is more important than design standards for cage sizes.

After the 2010 recalls over the big Salmonella outbreak involving Jack DeCoster’s Iowa egg farms, I was able to tag along with the teams of plaintiff lawyers and experts that the court allowed to go inside that part of the DeCoster kingdom. It was a bio-security area, meaning all these lawyers and experts had to dress up in those “sperm suits” with booties and mesh helmets.

Once inside, however, we all saw birds (including some chickens) freely flying about, rodents, and impressive amounts of manure. Some ares were more crowded than others. While the egg-laying and the feeding and watering continued in a house with about a half-million laying hens, one henhouse wall was literally being busted out from the pressure of all the manure that had been dumped behind it.

The wall was busting out because employees had fallen way behind in removing manure. One told me that heavy spring rains had made it impossible to get the chicken poop removed after it was stored up over the winter. He also said they were short-staffed. It became clear to me that the management and operation of egg-production systems should be the key concern.

It’s easy to think of the size of a cage in isolation, but that’s not realistic for large-scale egg production. These are huge systems that fill barns from floor to ceiling and wall to wall and represent a massive capital investment. Going into this change in California, we have consumers paying $ 4.49 per dozen for grocery store eggs. We can only guess how much more they are going to have to pay for bigger chicken cages.

But it is what it is. California won’t care how many eggs it breaks beginning Jan. 2. There will be all sorts of reactions over the law and treaties. But all that takes time, and everyday people eat eggs. Americans were on track to eat 266 each this year, or 23 dozen for each of us, according to the Egg Industry Center in Ames, IA. We ate five more eggs this year per capita than in 2013, and pricey beef and pork prices are also pushing up our egg consumption.

Every egg comes with some risk of Salmonella. Your risks go up if you often order sunny-side-up eggs, or if you have a taste for lightly soft-boiled eggs, or maybe you opt for Caesar salads. This applies to cage-free farms and even those backyard henhouses, which have been subject to a recent nationwide Salmonella outbreak.

Pasteurized eggs are available in the market. Lansing, IL-based Safest Choice, with an all-natural egg pasteurization process that eliminates Salmonella in eggs, appears to be doing nicely. The process does not change the nutrition or flavor. You can search the Safest Choice website for both nearby retailers and restaurants with pasteurized eggs.

But most eggs are sold raw. And the Salmonella risk is the same whether they are white or brown, conventional or organic. If this truly is the tipping point for somebody spending $ 10 billion to change out the housing for chickens, shouldn’t we get some improved food safety along the way?

Food Safety News

Sweet corn prices remain consistent

Sweet corn prices remain consistent

The Florida sweet corn market is relatively slow in comparison to the peak harvest in the spring season, however prices remains consistent on nearly all varieties. “White coloured corn saw a slight decrease,” explains Jason Stemm, a representative for the Sunshine Sweet Corn Farmers of Florida. “prices range from $ 14.95 to $ 16.95 for a 48 count crate.”

Texas is the only state which competes with Florida within the sweet corn market.  Domestic sales and processing account for the most sales, as 5% of the harvested corn is exported. “Most corn is sold within the continental United States and Canada, with a small amount being exported to Europe.”

Although acreage for Florida sweet corn has not increased, growers are always searching for new innovations.  The Sunshine Sweet Corn Farmers of Florida is an organization which consists of growers and shippers within South Florida. “The group is always evaluating new seed varieties and selecting only premium varieties to be sold as Sunshine Sweet Corn.”

During much of the season, Florida is the primary source for fresh sweet corn. However, during the harsh winter months, freezes can occur so the crop is constantly monitored. “Since sweet corn is planted in stages, the impact from freezes may be seen for a couple of weeks, but volumes tend to rebound.”

For more information please contact:
Sunshine Sweet Corn Farmers of Florida
Tel: (321) 214-5200
Fax: 321.214.0210
[email protected]
http://sunshinesweetcorn.com/
http://sunshinesweetcorn.com/retail/shippers

Publication date: 12/12/2014
Author: Kayleigh Csaszar
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Low prices for white Garlic

Low prices for white Garlic

Competition from other garlic-producing countries has led to low prices for France’s garlic exporters. The French garlic season began in July, and about a quarter of France’s production is exported.

“The market is very difficult,” said Nathalie Stephan of Condifrance. “The world market, and especially Spain, has very low prices.” French suppliers compete with Spain for the European market during the same time, so low prices for Spanish garlic means increased competition for French growers.

Condifrance sends their garlic to Belgium, Germany, Italy and Switzerland, and in addition to the garlic, they import supplies from Spain and Argentina. They ship white French garlic, purple germidour, pink French du Tarn and Pink Lautrec garlic. Despite the difficulties this year, Nathalie Stephan believes their season could get better.
“The future could be positive,” noted Nathalie, “if quality is good and prices become attractive for growers.”

For more information:
Nathalie Stephan

CondiFrance

Beaumont de Lomagne

Tel: +33 (0)6 73 70 39 85

Publication date: 12/9/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

“Banana prices are up”

Eduardo Ledesma, President of the Association of Banana Exporters of Ecuador
“Banana prices are up”

A 19.5 kilo box of Ecuadorian bananas for export will cost 6.55 dollars in 2015. This increase, higher than 9%, was announced a few days ago by Ecuador’s Ministry of Agriculture.

“Banana prices are up and it is insane, as we still don’t have the same tariff advantages in Europe as Colombia and Central America. This situation only serves to undermine our competitiveness,” affirms Eduardo Ledesma, president of the Association of Banana Exporters of Ecuador (AEBE).

Growing prices could partly be a response to rising production costs, but it is mainly due to the high demand for Ecuadorian fruit registered this year, which would lead, according to estimates by the AEBE, to break the record achieved in 2011, when 283 million boxes were shipped.

“Costs have increased, but not enough to justify a rise of that magnitude, and the circumstances that were taken into account to warrant this price increase are completely different to the current world problems,” explains Ledesma.

One factor that greatly influenced the increase in demand for Ecuadorian bananas was Colombia’s poor supply, reduced as a result of storms and heavy rains that affected 15,000 hectares of banana plantations in the region of Uraba, where more than 4,000 hectares were totally destroyed, and causing prices in Ecuador to increase between 1.5 and 2 dollars in a few days.

Moreover, the increased tension due to the territorial conflict in the South China Sea between China and the Philippines, the largest supplier of bananas to the Chinese market, brought complications and obstacles to trade between the countries of the region. This situation was also favourable for Ecuador, as it dramatically increased its shipments to China, reaching 300,000 boxes of bananas per week.

“In 2015, Colombia will recover its usual production volumes and, meanwhile, the Philippines is managing to improve its political relations with China; this, combined with lower demand in the Middle East because of conflicts and the Russian crisis, should result in a totally different situation to that of a few months ago,” affirms Ledesma.

Russia, Ecuador’s main client, accounting for 25% of the country’s banana exports, reduced its purchases by 300,000 boxes per week, forced by the depreciation of the Rouble and the economic crisis.

Furthermore, the Russian veto has resulted in a greater supply of various fruits in the European market, in many cases with falling prices, affecting the market share of bananas.

Given this complex situation, large companies already warned that they would reduce their purchases, which brought much concern to Ecuadorian banana producers.

According to Ledesma, the consequences will not be felt as much during the first months of the year, but as soon as Guatemala and other countries in the region start shipping, the large volume of fruit in the market will drive prices down, and the high internal costs generated by this increase will have a negative impact on the sector.

“We, at AEBE, will try to convince producers and the authorities to revise the price adjustment and bring it to a more realistic level, which is not an easy task, but we must try for the good of the industry and the country,” concludes Ledesma.

More information:
Eduardo Ledesma
AEBE
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Chinese garlic crop is largest in four years with lower prices expected

Prices for Chinese garlic have reached historic highs in recent years due to light crops, but this year’s crop is expected to be up in volume by about 35 percent with a corresponding drop in price, according to Jim Provost, managing partner of I Love Produce in West Grove, PA.

For the past three years, prices for Chinese garlic have been “stronger than they have ever been” previously, said Mr. Provost, who had just returned from a three-week visit to China when he spoke with The Produce News in late June.

ILP-Peeled-garlic-grading-aILP Peeled garlic grading after cooling.U.S. Department of Agriculture market reports show that “Chinese prices have been very strong, right up there compared to what California garlic is typically marketed at in a normal year,” he said.

Those strong prices are one reason for this year’s increase in production, he said. As with farmers in many places, when Chinese farmers “see there is money to be made, they plant more.”

In addition to the increased acreage, crop yields are particularly high this year, he said.

“This year was a convergence of not only the amount of acreage planted” but of higher yields as well, “so the combination of the two has led to the biggest crop in four years,” Provost said.

Planting acreage is about 20 percent higher than last year, and yields are up 10-15 percent, according to Provost. The net increase is expected to be in the range of 1 million to 1.5 million metric tons.

It is not a record crop, however, but more of a return to a typical crop, he said.

Provost said he expects to receive the first peeled garlic of the season from China the week of July 8 and the first fresh garlic the week of July 15. He expects I Love Produce to be the first company to have new-crop Chinese garlic available in the United States.

After three years of “relatively tight” supplies with prices “comparable to domestically grown garlic,” this year will be “an entirely different deal, with garlic at least 30 percent cheaper on average,” Provost said. “The quality is excellent and the size is very good, so it is time to promote garlic again. We are offering ads for peeled garlic, bulk garlic and packaged five-bulb netted garlic.”

Currently, there is a glut of last year’s garlic from China on the market, as importers are cleaning up old inventories in anticipation of this year’s larger crop, according to Provost.

“In order to provide our customers the freshest garlic, I made a trip to China in early June to inspect the new crop and settle some purchases with our growers,” he said.

Provost said that in addition to looking at new-crop garlic, he had a couple of other purposes in going to China in early June. One was to attend the Asian Fruit Congress in Qingdao in the Shandong province of China, a coastal city of about 8 million people located about midway between Beijing and Shanghai. At the conference, he said, there were guest speakers who talked about marketing in China, with a focus on second-tier cities such as Quingdao.

In addition, I Love Produce has “a couple of offices in China” through which it exports U.S.-grown fruit into China.

“So I spend more time in China than I used to because … the export side is a larger focus of what we are doing,” Provost said.

China is “an important market for U.S. food products and is now our number one agricultural customer, according to the USDA,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

US (CA): Lettuce prices remain high

With tight supplies out of California’s Central Coast, prices for lettuce from California have remained high. A combination of factors will likely mean light supplies into December, meaning the market will remain strong until at least then.

“We have a demand exceeds supply situation,” noted Mark McBride of Coastline Produce. “Highly unusual weather resulted in supplies out of Salinas being ahead of schedule, and they’re much lighter for this time of year.” Production out of Huron has been limited by a lack of water this year, and unfavourable weather in the desert-growing regions has thrown off production and quality. That has all contributed to higher prices.

As of November 7, a carton of Boston 24s out of the Salinas-Wattsonville area ranged in price between $ 11.65 and $ 16.50. For a carton of Romaine 24s, prices were between $ 24.75 and $ 28.55. Stiff prices will likely stick around for at least a few more weeks, noted McBride.

“We’re still going to see the effects of the heat into the coming weeks,” he explained. “We’re hoping the situation improves gradually, and mid-December is the earliest chance we have to returning to something close to normal.”

For more information:

Mark McBride

Coastline Produce

+1 831 755 1430

FreshPlaza.com

US (CA): Lettuce prices remain high

With tight supplies out of California’s Central Coast, prices for lettuce from California have remained high. A combination of factors will likely mean light supplies into December, meaning the market will remain strong until at least then.

“We have a demand exceeds supply situation,” noted Mark McBride of Coastline Produce. “Highly unusual weather resulted in supplies out of Salinas being ahead of schedule, and they’re much lighter for this time of year.” Production out of Huron has been limited by a lack of water this year, and unfavourable weather in the desert-growing regions has thrown off production and quality. That has all contributed to higher prices.

As of November 7, a carton of Boston 24s out of the Salinas-Wattsonville area ranged in price between $ 11.65 and $ 16.50. For a carton of Romaine 24s, prices were between $ 24.75 and $ 28.55. Stiff prices will likely stick around for at least a few more weeks, noted McBride.

“We’re still going to see the effects of the heat into the coming weeks,” he explained. “We’re hoping the situation improves gradually, and mid-December is the earliest chance we have to returning to something close to normal.”

For more information:

Mark McBride

Coastline Produce

+1 831 755 1430

FreshPlaza.com

US: Tomato prices steady with lull in supplies

After a summer of low prices for beefsteak tomatoes, prices for the commodity have risen as some states have finished harvesting. But prices could come down again as supplies pick up in Florida.

“This summer had one of the worst tomato markets I’ve seen,” said Greg Styers of Bejo Seeds. He pointed to high yields, spurred on by favorable weather, for the low prices. With so many tomatoes on the market, prices took a steep drop.

“Prices are good right now, but I knew of growers that couldn’t pick some of their tomatoes because of the market,” said Styers. He added that prices for a box of tomatoes is usually just below $ 20.00, but this summer brought prices as low as $ 4.50 for a box. It wasn’t until supplies from the Carolinas and Virginia dropped that prices began to climb. That upswing began in October, and Styers believes that current prices, which hover near $ 22.00 a box, will remain until the middle of November, when large supplies from Florida hit the market.

“Volumes from Florida should pick up sometime in the second week of November from Sarasota,” said Styers. “It’s hard to say how the market will be until then, because just a few inches of hard rain at the wrong time could transform a good season into a bad one.”

In addition to traditional beefsteak tomatoes, Bejo Seeds markets their own brand of Tasti-Lee tomatoes. The variety, developed by Dr. Jay Scott and licensed out of the University of Florida, is sold as a firmer, more colorful and tastier option to traditional tomatoes. The vine-ripened tomato also contains more lycopene than traditional varieties.

“We’re a seed company, and we generally breed our own tomatoes, but Tasti-Lee is so unique that we licensed it and have the exclusive rights to the seed and to the name,” said Styers. Bejo Seeds works with seven partners across the country who grow, pack and ship the product to retailers. That the variety can also be grown in a wide range of conditions also means Bejo Seeds partners are spread out all over the United States. That network has allowed them to put Tasti-Lee tomatoes in over 30 retail locations in the United States and Canada. The product has, so far, been well-received, and Styers credits the tomato’s taste, appearance and health content for that.

“This is a true vine-ripened tomato, and what sets it apart is that it has a consistent color and 50 percent more lycopene than most tomatoes,” said Styers. “I would put it up against any hothouse tomato.”

For more information:

Greg Styers

Bejo Seeds

+1 805 473 2199

FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

UK: High prices for spring onions

First Egyptian supply at Masr Fruit
UK: High prices for spring onions

The UK market is short of spring onions, this is due to storms last week which effectively put an end to the Dutch and German supplies, the English season also ended early leaving the market pretty empty.

“This has put the focus on the Egyptian crop,” said Zine Zouggari from Masr Fruit’s UK office. “We will receive the first container of spring onions from Egypt today, coming in at Felixstowe, next week will see more containers arriving.”

Zouggari said that normally arrivals from Egypt would start mid November, but have been pushed forward due the the short supply from elsewhere. He said prices would be much higher than normal until the middle of next week when bigger volumes start to arrive in the UK.

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Positive melon campaign – less produce but satisfying prices

Bruno Francescon
Italy: Positive melon campaign – less produce but satisfying prices

“The 2014 melon campaign started very well in February with produce from Senegal: the fruit was of exceptional quality and clients responded well, so much so that we did not have enough to meet demand. Unfortunately, we finished our imports from Africa overlapping with production from Sicily, but it was an excellent spring campaign in general,” explains Bruno Francescon, chairman and administrator of a PO.


“As regards the Sicilian produce, prices were quite low, then temperatures dropped in May and demand remained low too, so we could barely cover production costs.”


“TerraEqua” is the brand of Francescon melons cultivated in Senegal.

“June and July went very well due to the increase in volumes and sufficient prices…up until the night between July 17th and 18th, when a hailstorm in the Mantua area changed things. Expectations were positive and quality was good, but we still had 700 ha to harvest and 400 ha were affected.”


“We recorded a +20% in July thanks to increased exports and new clients, but then in August and September we lost something like 500 trucks of melons. Thankfully, prices doubled in the last two months – almost €1/kg on average.”

“The 2014 campaign has been actually positive, with 25% less volumes but with a slightly increased turnover.”

Contacts:
OP Francescon
Via Retenago, 13
46040 Rodigo (MN) – Italy
Tel.: +39 0376 650727
Fax: +39 0376 684777
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.op-francescon.it

Publication date: 10/22/2014
Author: Rebecca Baron
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Kiwifruit prices expected to decline as imports hit the market

Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager at Stellar Distributing Inc. in Madera, CA, said marketplace dynamics will be changing by the end of October as kiwifruit imports from Italy continue to arrive in the United States.

“The glut is two weeks away,” he told The Produce News Oct. 13.

Stellar Distributing was established in the 1990s by parent company Catania Worldwide, which began operations in Toronto in 1929. Today, the third generation of the Catania family moves an extensive array of fresh produce to the global marketplace. The company is now headquartered in Mississauga, ON.

Stellar Distributing grows and markets kiwifruit and figs. The company also markets chestnuts, limes, apricots, pomegranates and persimmons. As a company, Stellar is vertically integrated, working with an extensive network of growers and suppliers in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

“Kiwi consumption continues to grow,” Paul Catania Jr., owner of Catania Worldwide, told The Produce News. “More and more people are growing the Gold variety.” Globally, he said Italy is the second-largest producer of kiwifruit. “U.S. kiwi will always have a home,” he added.

Cappelluti said the 2014 kiwifruit season has been a good one, and California production ramped up in early October. He said Stellar has been moving 25 loads of quality kiwifruit per week. Sales of California kiwifruit will continue through the end of April.

“The kiwi deal has been strong,” he stated. “But I see the deal crashing in the next two to three weeks.”

California and Italy are both Northern Hemisphere producers, and Cappelluti said Italian producers expect overall volume will be up approximately 15 percent this season. As a result, he said the United States will surely see increased competition from exports for shelf space at retail. Pricing, he added, is expected to decline as Italian exports are received in the United States.

“We want to be fair to all global growers,” he said, adding that Stellar also imports kiwifruit from Chile, New Zealand, France and Greece. “I don’t want to see a severe crash in the United States.”

As prices begin to fall, Cappelluti said it will be important for retailers to work with companies that can deliver promised volume.

“Choose wisely,” he said. “It’s important to go to companies that specialize in kiwi.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Kiwifruit prices expected to decline as imports hit the market

Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager at Stellar Distributing Inc. in Madera, CA, said marketplace dynamics will be changing by the end of October as kiwifruit imports from Italy continue to arrive in the United States.

“The glut is two weeks away,” he told The Produce News Oct. 13.

Stellar Distributing was established in the 1990s by parent company Catania Worldwide, which began operations in Toronto in 1929. Today, the third generation of the Catania family moves an extensive array of fresh produce to the global marketplace. The company is now headquartered in Mississauga, ON.

Stellar Distributing grows and markets kiwifruit and figs. The company also markets chestnuts, limes, apricots, pomegranates and persimmons. As a company, Stellar is vertically integrated, working with an extensive network of growers and suppliers in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

“Kiwi consumption continues to grow,” Paul Catania Jr., owner of Catania Worldwide, told The Produce News. “More and more people are growing the Gold variety.” Globally, he said Italy is the second-largest producer of kiwifruit. “U.S. kiwi will always have a home,” he added.

Cappelluti said the 2014 kiwifruit season has been a good one, and California production ramped up in early October. He said Stellar has been moving 25 loads of quality kiwifruit per week. Sales of California kiwifruit will continue through the end of April.

“The kiwi deal has been strong,” he stated. “But I see the deal crashing in the next two to three weeks.”

California and Italy are both Northern Hemisphere producers, and Cappelluti said Italian producers expect overall volume will be up approximately 15 percent this season. As a result, he said the United States will surely see increased competition from exports for shelf space at retail. Pricing, he added, is expected to decline as Italian exports are received in the United States.

“We want to be fair to all global growers,” he said, adding that Stellar also imports kiwifruit from Chile, New Zealand, France and Greece. “I don’t want to see a severe crash in the United States.”

As prices begin to fall, Cappelluti said it will be important for retailers to work with companies that can deliver promised volume.

“Choose wisely,” he said. “It’s important to go to companies that specialize in kiwi.”

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