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Retailers, producers gear up for Year of the Goat

Retailers can be assured that produce departments will be well stocked with fresh Asian items during Chinese New Year. The Year of the Goat officially begins on Feb. 19.

Patsy Ross, marketing director for Christopher Ranch LLC, said the Gilroy, CA-based company offers a variety of products to add flavor to any meal. “We handle fresh ginger year-round,” she told The Produce News. “We also have some processed ginger items, chopped ginger and garlic ginger stir fry.”

At the current time, Christopher Ranch is transitioning from South American-grown ginger to its Hawaiian ginger crop.Asian3Lakeside Organic Gardens grows Asian vegetables in California’s Imperial Valley. The company plants sweet alyssum to attract beneficial insects such as hover flies which eat aphid larvae. Seen here is a cabbage field in which this pest control practice is used. (Photo courtesy of Lakeside Organic Gardens) “The Hawaiian ginger season normally runs from December through June,” she said. “The Hawaiian ginger is grown in the Hilo, Hawaii, area. We have worked with ginger growers in Hawaii for over 25 years.”

Trends at the consumer level have been favorable for Asian produce. “Interest in Asian cuisine has moved from every town in America having a Chinese food restaurant to Japanese, Thai, Korean and Vietnamese foods both in restaurants and in grocery stores,” she commented. “Ginger is an important flavor profile in all types of Asian cuisine.”

Jim Provost, owner of I Love Produce in Kelton, PA, agreed. “Ginger is really growing in demand for its flavor and health benefits,” he stated. “Peru has become a major player in the world ginger market, and I Love Produce has helped significantly contribute to that growth. After China, Peru exported more ginger to the United States in 2014 than any other country. The quality of Peru ginger is the best in the world in terms of skin condition and flavor, and they have an excellent crop this year.”

I Love Produce also moves a variety of Asian pears, including Gingo, Golden and Ya, from China. “Asian pears are also growing in popularity,” he said, adding that the company is packaging Asian pears under the “Eat Brighter!” campaign. “We are the only company using Eat Brighter! to help sell Chinese pears,” he went on to say. “Kids love the juicy sweet flavor of Asian pears, so the Eat Brighter! campaign is a great way to promote this product to both children and their parents.”

The company also markets oriental sweet potatoes.

Lindsey Roberts, who handles marketing communications for Lakeside Organic Gardens, said the company grows organic Asian produce on 800 acres in California’s Imperial Valley. “Volume is on par, and quality looks great,” she told The Produce News. “As kimchi and other fermented foods grow in popularity, so does the demand for Napa cabbage. We supply many organic fermented food producers with bok choy, green cabbage, carrots and Napa cabbage. Carrots complement Asian cooking very nicely as well.”

The Santa Cruz, CA-based company helps consumers incorporate Asian produce into menu planning and preparation. “On our social media platforms, we encourage people to learn about all the vegetables we grow and give easy ideas to incorporate vegetables into everyday menus,” Roberts noted. “The Asian items are popular in stir frys and soups. In January, we will share our rendition of a delicious California cole slaw recipe.”

Paul Boris, co-owner and vice president of Agritrade Farms LLC in Deerfield Beach, FL, said the company specializes in okra branded under the “Gumbo-Licious” label. Okra accounts for approximately roughly 50 percent of Agritrade’s total sales, and 40 percent of okra is marketed in Europe. “Okra is extremely healthy and is experiencing tremendous growth among Americans and Europeans as they become more concerned about eating healthy,” Boris commented.

Agritrade imports Asian vegetables from the Dominican Republic and Honduras. The line includes items such as banana flower, Chinese bitter melon, Chinese eggplant, curry leaves, green long beans, Thai eggplant and tindora.

“There are approximately 18 million Asians and Asian Americans living in the U.S. representing about 5 percent of the population,” Boris stated. “Major cities with Asian demographics include New York, Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. There are approximately 5 million Asians and Asian Canadians living in Canada representing approximately 15 percent of the population. Major cities with significant Asian populations include Toronto and Vancouver.”

Boris said Asian vegetables are becoming more popular with American consumers. “Many Americans are first introduced to the flavors of Asian vegetables in restaurants,” he observed. “Look at the American growth of guacamole, salsa and others via the American growing Hispanic demographics. Asian vegetables are experiencing similar growth on a smaller scale with new American customers enjoying the great taste of Asian cooking.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Retailers, producers gear up for Year of the Goat

Retailers can be assured that produce departments will be well stocked with fresh Asian items during Chinese New Year. The Year of the Goat officially begins on Feb. 19.

Patsy Ross, marketing director for Christopher Ranch LLC, said the Gilroy, CA-based company offers a variety of products to add flavor to any meal. “We handle fresh ginger year-round,” she told The Produce News. “We also have some processed ginger items, chopped ginger and garlic ginger stir fry.”

At the current time, Christopher Ranch is transitioning from South American-grown ginger to its Hawaiian ginger crop.Asian3Lakeside Organic Gardens grows Asian vegetables in California’s Imperial Valley. The company plants sweet alyssum to attract beneficial insects such as hover flies which eat aphid larvae. Seen here is a cabbage field in which this pest control practice is used. (Photo courtesy of Lakeside Organic Gardens) “The Hawaiian ginger season normally runs from December through June,” she said. “The Hawaiian ginger is grown in the Hilo, Hawaii, area. We have worked with ginger growers in Hawaii for over 25 years.”

Trends at the consumer level have been favorable for Asian produce. “Interest in Asian cuisine has moved from every town in America having a Chinese food restaurant to Japanese, Thai, Korean and Vietnamese foods both in restaurants and in grocery stores,” she commented. “Ginger is an important flavor profile in all types of Asian cuisine.”

Jim Provost, owner of I Love Produce in Kelton, PA, agreed. “Ginger is really growing in demand for its flavor and health benefits,” he stated. “Peru has become a major player in the world ginger market, and I Love Produce has helped significantly contribute to that growth. After China, Peru exported more ginger to the United States in 2014 than any other country. The quality of Peru ginger is the best in the world in terms of skin condition and flavor, and they have an excellent crop this year.”

I Love Produce also moves a variety of Asian pears, including Gingo, Golden and Ya, from China. “Asian pears are also growing in popularity,” he said, adding that the company is packaging Asian pears under the “Eat Brighter!” campaign. “We are the only company using Eat Brighter! to help sell Chinese pears,” he went on to say. “Kids love the juicy sweet flavor of Asian pears, so the Eat Brighter! campaign is a great way to promote this product to both children and their parents.”

The company also markets oriental sweet potatoes.

Lindsey Roberts, who handles marketing communications for Lakeside Organic Gardens, said the company grows organic Asian produce on 800 acres in California’s Imperial Valley. “Volume is on par, and quality looks great,” she told The Produce News. “As kimchi and other fermented foods grow in popularity, so does the demand for Napa cabbage. We supply many organic fermented food producers with bok choy, green cabbage, carrots and Napa cabbage. Carrots complement Asian cooking very nicely as well.”

The Santa Cruz, CA-based company helps consumers incorporate Asian produce into menu planning and preparation. “On our social media platforms, we encourage people to learn about all the vegetables we grow and give easy ideas to incorporate vegetables into everyday menus,” Roberts noted. “The Asian items are popular in stir frys and soups. In January, we will share our rendition of a delicious California cole slaw recipe.”

Paul Boris, co-owner and vice president of Agritrade Farms LLC in Deerfield Beach, FL, said the company specializes in okra branded under the “Gumbo-Licious” label. Okra accounts for approximately roughly 50 percent of Agritrade’s total sales, and 40 percent of okra is marketed in Europe. “Okra is extremely healthy and is experiencing tremendous growth among Americans and Europeans as they become more concerned about eating healthy,” Boris commented.

Agritrade imports Asian vegetables from the Dominican Republic and Honduras. The line includes items such as banana flower, Chinese bitter melon, Chinese eggplant, curry leaves, green long beans, Thai eggplant and tindora.

“There are approximately 18 million Asians and Asian Americans living in the U.S. representing about 5 percent of the population,” Boris stated. “Major cities with Asian demographics include New York, Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. There are approximately 5 million Asians and Asian Canadians living in Canada representing approximately 15 percent of the population. Major cities with significant Asian populations include Toronto and Vancouver.”

Boris said Asian vegetables are becoming more popular with American consumers. “Many Americans are first introduced to the flavors of Asian vegetables in restaurants,” he observed. “Look at the American growth of guacamole, salsa and others via the American growing Hispanic demographics. Asian vegetables are experiencing similar growth on a smaller scale with new American customers enjoying the great taste of Asian cooking.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Retailers, producers gear up for Year of the Goat

Retailers can be assured that produce departments will be well stocked with fresh Asian items during Chinese New Year. The Year of the Goat officially begins on Feb. 19.

Patsy Ross, marketing director for Christopher Ranch LLC, said the Gilroy, CA-based company offers a variety of products to add flavor to any meal. “We handle fresh ginger year-round,” she told The Produce News. “We also have some processed ginger items, chopped ginger and garlic ginger stir fry.”

At the current time, Christopher Ranch is transitioning from South American-grown ginger to its Hawaiian ginger crop.Asian3Lakeside Organic Gardens grows Asian vegetables in California’s Imperial Valley. The company plants sweet alyssum to attract beneficial insects such as hover flies which eat aphid larvae. Seen here is a cabbage field in which this pest control practice is used. (Photo courtesy of Lakeside Organic Gardens) “The Hawaiian ginger season normally runs from December through June,” she said. “The Hawaiian ginger is grown in the Hilo, Hawaii, area. We have worked with ginger growers in Hawaii for over 25 years.”

Trends at the consumer level have been favorable for Asian produce. “Interest in Asian cuisine has moved from every town in America having a Chinese food restaurant to Japanese, Thai, Korean and Vietnamese foods both in restaurants and in grocery stores,” she commented. “Ginger is an important flavor profile in all types of Asian cuisine.”

Jim Provost, owner of I Love Produce in Kelton, PA, agreed. “Ginger is really growing in demand for its flavor and health benefits,” he stated. “Peru has become a major player in the world ginger market, and I Love Produce has helped significantly contribute to that growth. After China, Peru exported more ginger to the United States in 2014 than any other country. The quality of Peru ginger is the best in the world in terms of skin condition and flavor, and they have an excellent crop this year.”

I Love Produce also moves a variety of Asian pears, including Gingo, Golden and Ya, from China. “Asian pears are also growing in popularity,” he said, adding that the company is packaging Asian pears under the “Eat Brighter!” campaign. “We are the only company using Eat Brighter! to help sell Chinese pears,” he went on to say. “Kids love the juicy sweet flavor of Asian pears, so the Eat Brighter! campaign is a great way to promote this product to both children and their parents.”

The company also markets oriental sweet potatoes.

Lindsey Roberts, who handles marketing communications for Lakeside Organic Gardens, said the company grows organic Asian produce on 800 acres in California’s Imperial Valley. “Volume is on par, and quality looks great,” she told The Produce News. “As kimchi and other fermented foods grow in popularity, so does the demand for Napa cabbage. We supply many organic fermented food producers with bok choy, green cabbage, carrots and Napa cabbage. Carrots complement Asian cooking very nicely as well.”

The Santa Cruz, CA-based company helps consumers incorporate Asian produce into menu planning and preparation. “On our social media platforms, we encourage people to learn about all the vegetables we grow and give easy ideas to incorporate vegetables into everyday menus,” Roberts noted. “The Asian items are popular in stir frys and soups. In January, we will share our rendition of a delicious California cole slaw recipe.”

Paul Boris, co-owner and vice president of Agritrade Farms LLC in Deerfield Beach, FL, said the company specializes in okra branded under the “Gumbo-Licious” label. Okra accounts for approximately roughly 50 percent of Agritrade’s total sales, and 40 percent of okra is marketed in Europe. “Okra is extremely healthy and is experiencing tremendous growth among Americans and Europeans as they become more concerned about eating healthy,” Boris commented.

Agritrade imports Asian vegetables from the Dominican Republic and Honduras. The line includes items such as banana flower, Chinese bitter melon, Chinese eggplant, curry leaves, green long beans, Thai eggplant and tindora.

“There are approximately 18 million Asians and Asian Americans living in the U.S. representing about 5 percent of the population,” Boris stated. “Major cities with Asian demographics include New York, Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. There are approximately 5 million Asians and Asian Canadians living in Canada representing approximately 15 percent of the population. Major cities with significant Asian populations include Toronto and Vancouver.”

Boris said Asian vegetables are becoming more popular with American consumers. “Many Americans are first introduced to the flavors of Asian vegetables in restaurants,” he observed. “Look at the American growth of guacamole, salsa and others via the American growing Hispanic demographics. Asian vegetables are experiencing similar growth on a smaller scale with new American customers enjoying the great taste of Asian cooking.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Carriers are Dropping Liability Coverage for Raw-Milk Producers

Some folks who drink raw milk probably already see themselves as risk-takers, but they may not have thought about the fact that drinking their favorite beverage increasingly means not just taking risk but, for the producers, also “going bare.”

“Going bare” is what the insurance industry calls it when someone opts to go without coverage either because they cannot afford it or because it is just not available. For at least the past two years, reports have popped up around the country about raw-milk producers having difficulty obtaining or continuing insurance coverage.

One example came early in 2012 when the Farm Bureau-owned Rural Mutual Insurance Co. sent out notices about all Wisconsin farm policies it covers specifically advising policyholders that their coverage does not provide for “the sale and/or distribution for offsite consumption of unpasteurized (commonly call raw) milk from cows, sheep and goats for human consumption.”

Retail sales of raw milk are illegal in Wisconsin, but off-site consumption of unpasteurized milk bought on the farm is legal. However, raw milk picked up on the farm has apparently become too risky for insurance coverage in Wisconsin.

What began as decisions by individual carriers who sell policies directly to small farms is now a concern for the big re-insurers such as Kansas City, MO-based Aon Risk Solutions. It is more of an insurance company for insurance carriers and helps to keep the industry solvent by spreading risk.

“Most of the entities we work with are larger commercial operations and are not engaged in the sale of raw milk,” explained Tami Griffin, deputy national director for Aon’s Food Systems, Agribusiness & Beverage Group.

“That said,” she told Food Safety News, “we do work with, and have relationships with, underwriters who are in the business of insuring farms, and I would say that they are increasingly concerned about what farmers are selling to consumers through farmers markets, farm stands, etc.”

“Because of the press that raw milk gets, it is definitely on the radar of insurance companies, and I have heard some carriers are not willing to provide coverage for those selling it,” Griffin added.

Insurance coverage going away is still coming as a surprise for some raw-milk producers. Dog Mountain Farm near Carnation, WA, outside Seattle — a stop on many a foodie’s tour itinerary — recently learned that its carrier was dropping its raw-milk coverage.

Dog Mountain runs a farm-to-table café offering a menu for three meals a day, with patrons being a mix of those food tourists and area residents. They had invested $ 75,000 in a USDA-certified raw goat milk dairy and then found they had lost their liability insurance.

Owner Cindy Krepky said the farm would proceed with its many other activities — producing cider, apple butter, and 15 varieties of apples, pears, and quince — while hunting down a carrier willing to sell insurance for its raw goat milk production.

Krepky was philosophical when learning her raw-milk policy was cancelled, noting that farming is always risky.

For a raw-milk producer, going bare carries the same risk as going without automobile or home insurance. It means being responsible for any kind of damages or injuries without being able to share that risk with an insurance company.

It is not uncommon for treatment of a child or senior citizen injured by a pathogen such as E. coli O157:H7 or Listeria to result in direct medical costs exceeding $ 1 million. It makes the decision to go bare literally a bet-the-farm kind of decision.

While tough to get, raw-milk insurance has not totally gone away. Kendall Turner, a Denver insurance broker, advertises on the web that such coverage is still available.

“Recently, it has become very difficult for dairy farms to obtain liability coverage for the sale of raw milk,” Turner said, adding that he can determine in about 20 minutes if someone qualifies for coverage.

He said that the “biggest challenge for the farmer is to understand is that the insurance company sometimes has more rules than the state … .”

Food Safety News

Despite Ruling, Midwest Egg Producers Unlikely to Give Up California Market Without a Fight

Even after being told last week that they don’t have standing to sue in federal court, six Midwest egg-producing states aren’t likely to give up either battery cages for their laying hens nor the big California market.

Battery cages are housing systems for chickens, laying hens, and various other types of poultry production systems which are used by most egg producers in the U.S. Originally designed for disease control with mechanisms to remove eggs, deliver feed and dispose of manure, they’ve drawn criticism for cramping the birds.

In November 2008, California voters approved Proposition 2, which, effective Jan. 1, 2015, set standards for confining farm animals. The state assembly amended Prop. 2 in 2010. In 2012, the University of California – Davis estimated that changing the hen housing infrastructure to comply with Prop. 2 was going to cost egg producers $ 385 million.

Attorneys general for the six egg-producing states that joined in the tossed lawsuit — Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma — say they’re reviewing their legal options.

Meanwhile, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, favored to win easy re-election for his sixth term, promises to keep “fighting for the state’s agricultural industry.” Iowa is the nation’s largest egg producer.

An Oct. 3 Des Moines Register story carried the headline: “California egg law may lead to ag war between the states.” It noted that the new California law will require at least 116 square inches of space per hen, which is slightly smaller than a sheet of legal paper (8.5 by 14 inches). The current industry standard is 67 square inches, or a little smaller than a 10-by-7-inch rectangle.

For a while, it appeared that the chicken cage issue was going to go away in a big national compromise. That was in July 2011, when the United Egg Producers (UEP) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) entered into a deal to work together on a national cage standard.

It was thought at the time that the industry group and the group usually at the forefront of opposition to large-scale animal production would bring a dramatic end to this lengthy dispute. The much-delayed Farm Bill was to be the vehicle for the UEP-HSUS deal.

But it didn’t happen, and California’s Prop. 2 was later amended to protect that state’s own egg producers by mandating the larger cages for any eggs sold in the state, even if they were produced elsewhere. That’s why the six Midwest states, led by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, went to federal court in early 2014.

However, Judge Kimberly Mueller of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California ruled Oct. 2 that they had failed to show that Prop. 2 as amended harmed the general public in their states rather than simply posed potential harm to some egg producers.

“It is patently clear plaintiffs are bringing this action on behalf of a subset of each state’s egg farmers, not on behalf of each state’s population generally,” she wrote in her decision.

“We disagree with the federal court’s opinion that Missouri lacks standing to defend its businesses and consumers against burdensome economic regulation imposed by out-of-state legislatures,” Koster spokesman Eric Slusher said.

While the six states did not gain traction in the courts this time due to the judge’s call on standing, they are unlikely to go away. And their main concerns have little to do with Prop. 2′s promise “to prohibit the cruel confinement of farm animals” in California.

The Midwestern egg-producing states are really challenging — much like a foreign trade barrier — Assembly Bill 1437 passed by the California Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Schwarzenegger in 2010. It added three additional sections to the 2008 law.

Under AB 1437, as of Jan. 1, shell eggs for human consumption cannot be legally sold in California unless the involved laying hen was kept in facilities that meet California’s animal care standards.

It’s a requirement that has raised numerous questions, but among the most important is whether California can impose its animal care standards on other states as the price of entry to its market. Also, in the recently dismissed lawsuit, the six states argued that the evidence shows that the real purpose of the 2010 amendments was merely to “level the playing field so that in-state producers are not disadvantaged.”

That quote was from a California Assembly committee report for AB 1437. In other words, the states argued that California was not acting to make food safer nor animals healthier, but to advance its own purely commercial interests.

As to whether cage size does involve food safety, there is also dispute. The six states argued that there is no scientific evidence of a correlation between cage size or stocking density and the incidence of Salmonella in egg-laying hens. AB 1437 advocates, however, claimed that battery-cage eggs are 25 times more likely to harbor Salmonella than eggs from cage-free hens.

Food Safety News

Despite Ruling, Midwest Egg Producers Unlikely to Give Up California Market Without a Fight

Even after being told last week that they don’t have standing to sue in federal court, six Midwest egg-producing states aren’t likely to give up either battery cages for their laying hens nor the big California market.

Battery cages are housing systems for chickens, laying hens, and various other types of poultry production systems which are used by most egg producers in the U.S. Originally designed for disease control with mechanisms to remove eggs, deliver feed and dispose of manure, they’ve drawn criticism for cramping the birds.

In November 2008, California voters approved Proposition 2, which, effective Jan. 1, 2015, set standards for confining farm animals. The state assembly amended Prop. 2 in 2010. In 2012, the University of California – Davis estimated that changing the hen housing infrastructure to comply with Prop. 2 was going to cost egg producers $ 385 million.

Attorneys general for the six egg-producing states that joined in the tossed lawsuit — Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma — say they’re reviewing their legal options.

Meanwhile, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, favored to win easy re-election for his sixth term, promises to keep “fighting for the state’s agricultural industry.” Iowa is the nation’s largest egg producer.

An Oct. 3 Des Moines Register story carried the headline: “California egg law may lead to ag war between the states.” It noted that the new California law will require at least 116 square inches of space per hen, which is slightly smaller than a sheet of legal paper (8.5 by 14 inches). The current industry standard is 67 square inches, or a little smaller than a 10-by-7-inch rectangle.

For a while, it appeared that the chicken cage issue was going to go away in a big national compromise. That was in July 2011, when the United Egg Producers (UEP) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) entered into a deal to work together on a national cage standard.

It was thought at the time that the industry group and the group usually at the forefront of opposition to large-scale animal production would bring a dramatic end to this lengthy dispute. The much-delayed Farm Bill was to be the vehicle for the UEP-HSUS deal.

But it didn’t happen, and California’s Prop. 2 was later amended to protect that state’s own egg producers by mandating the larger cages for any eggs sold in the state, even if they were produced elsewhere. That’s why the six Midwest states, led by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, went to federal court in early 2014.

However, Judge Kimberly Mueller of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California ruled Oct. 2 that they had failed to show that Prop. 2 as amended harmed the general public in their states rather than simply posed potential harm to some egg producers.

“It is patently clear plaintiffs are bringing this action on behalf of a subset of each state’s egg farmers, not on behalf of each state’s population generally,” she wrote in her decision.

“We disagree with the federal court’s opinion that Missouri lacks standing to defend its businesses and consumers against burdensome economic regulation imposed by out-of-state legislatures,” Koster spokesman Eric Slusher said.

While the six states did not gain traction in the courts this time due to the judge’s call on standing, they are unlikely to go away. And their main concerns have little to do with Prop. 2′s promise “to prohibit the cruel confinement of farm animals” in California.

The Midwestern egg-producing states are really challenging — much like a foreign trade barrier — Assembly Bill 1437 passed by the California Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Schwarzenegger in 2010. It added three additional sections to the 2008 law.

Under AB 1437, as of Jan. 1, shell eggs for human consumption cannot be legally sold in California unless the involved laying hen was kept in facilities that meet California’s animal care standards.

It’s a requirement that has raised numerous questions, but among the most important is whether California can impose its animal care standards on other states as the price of entry to its market. Also, in the recently dismissed lawsuit, the six states argued that the evidence shows that the real purpose of the 2010 amendments was merely to “level the playing field so that in-state producers are not disadvantaged.”

That quote was from a California Assembly committee report for AB 1437. In other words, the states argued that California was not acting to make food safer nor animals healthier, but to advance its own purely commercial interests.

As to whether cage size does involve food safety, there is also dispute. The six states argued that there is no scientific evidence of a correlation between cage size or stocking density and the incidence of Salmonella in egg-laying hens. AB 1437 advocates, however, claimed that battery-cage eggs are 25 times more likely to harbor Salmonella than eggs from cage-free hens.

Food Safety News