Blog Archives

Seattle Puts Healthy Snacks in City’s Vending Machines

Three years after Seattle put healthy snacks in vending machines located in parks and recreation facilities, the city Monday applied the policy to all its properties.

That means that at least half of the options in vending machines on city-owned must be considered “healthier” and “healthiest” options. To meet this criteria, food items need to be on a list developed by the Seattle-King County Public Health Department.

This means baby carrots and celery sticks will share vending space equally with caramel chocolate bars and peanut butter cups.

The healthy vending machine policy is intended to help those who work or visit city properties to avoid eating too much sugar, saturated and trans fat, refined grains and sodium.

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn said the city was trying to do its part in providing healthy choices “to those who want them.” The policy was adopted by a unanimous vote of the Seattle City Council. Councilmember Richard Conlin sponsored the measure.

“Healthy vending helps to make the healthy choice the easy choice,” Conlin said. “This is one way we can support healthy and productive City employees. City employees will now have more opportunities to consume more nutritious food and beverages while at work.”

The Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation adopted their vending machine guidelines in 2010. In addition to carrots and celery, the guidelines call for fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, fat-free dairy and lean meats and fish.

The joint Seattle-King County Public Health Department says more than one half of the area’s adults are overweight or obese.

Food Safety News

Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest puts spotlight on healthy eating for kids

Students from the Walker Junior High School in LA Palma, CA, will tackle healthy eating on Friday, Oct. 17 when they put 10 produce-centric recipes to the test at the fourth annual PMA Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest. The contest, sponsored by Bolthouse Farms and supported by Disney Consumer Products, features the top 10 recipes submitted by exhibitors that will be judged by the students and 15 key buyers, including Delhaize America, Pro*Act and SuperValu.

“Inspiring children to eat more fresh produce can take many shapes,” Todd Putman, chief commercial officer for Bolthouse Farms, said in a press release. “Whether it’s traditional marketing like the ‘eat brighter!’ movement, or through engagement in contests like this one, it’s our responsibility as an industry to engage tomorrow’s leaders in efforts that lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

“Disney continues to be a leader in inspiring kids and families to eat more nutritious food and live a more active lifestyle, and it’s truly rewarding to see our efforts create real change,” John T. King, vice president of licensing for Disney-branded consumables, added in the release. “It’s exciting to see the kids’ reactions, and we celebrate the industry for creating both inventive and healthy recipes.”

More than 55 produce-centric, kid-friendly recipes were submitted. The top 10 recipes, selected by the buyer judges, will be featured onsite during the Sensory Experience Contest, where the judges, buyers and kids, will place their votes for “Buyers’ Choice” and “Kids’ Choice.” The top 10 recipes can be sampled at the Fresh Ideas in Action Reception at 4 p.m. in Room 303AD of the Anaheim Convention Center. Winners of the Buyers’ Choice and Kids’ Choice awards will be highlighted during the reception and in the Innovation @ Work area located in Lobby B/C of the convention center.

Finalists and recipes are:

  • Alsum Farms & Produce Inc.: Rainbow Potato Pancakes
  • Ball Design: Fresh Fruit Nachos with Honey Yogurt Drizzle
  • Church Bros. LLC: Rainbow Kale Tostada
  • Giorgio Fresh Co.: Mushroom Sauce Pizza with Mozzarella & Cheddar Cheese
  • Green Giant Fresh: Cauliflower & Avocado Croquettes with Honey Dijon & Avocado Aioli
  • Mucci Farms: Cool Summer Treats Made with CUTECUMBERS
  • Sage Fruit Co.: Skinny Breakfast Apple Turnovers
  • Sunkist: Sunkist Orange Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
  • Wholesum Family Farms: Wholesum Harvest Eggplant Vegetable Balls with Roma Tomato Sauce
  • Wish Farms: Wish Farms Strawberry Blueberry Hazelnut Chocolate Flatbread

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest puts spotlight on healthy eating for kids

Students from the Walker Junior High School in LA Palma, CA, will tackle healthy eating on Friday, Oct. 17 when they put 10 produce-centric recipes to the test at the fourth annual PMA Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest. The contest, sponsored by Bolthouse Farms and supported by Disney Consumer Products, features the top 10 recipes submitted by exhibitors that will be judged by the students and 15 key buyers, including Delhaize America, Pro*Act and SuperValu.

“Inspiring children to eat more fresh produce can take many shapes,” Todd Putman, chief commercial officer for Bolthouse Farms, said in a press release. “Whether it’s traditional marketing like the ‘eat brighter!’ movement, or through engagement in contests like this one, it’s our responsibility as an industry to engage tomorrow’s leaders in efforts that lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

“Disney continues to be a leader in inspiring kids and families to eat more nutritious food and live a more active lifestyle, and it’s truly rewarding to see our efforts create real change,” John T. King, vice president of licensing for Disney-branded consumables, added in the release. “It’s exciting to see the kids’ reactions, and we celebrate the industry for creating both inventive and healthy recipes.”

More than 55 produce-centric, kid-friendly recipes were submitted. The top 10 recipes, selected by the buyer judges, will be featured onsite during the Sensory Experience Contest, where the judges, buyers and kids, will place their votes for “Buyers’ Choice” and “Kids’ Choice.” The top 10 recipes can be sampled at the Fresh Ideas in Action Reception at 4 p.m. in Room 303AD of the Anaheim Convention Center. Winners of the Buyers’ Choice and Kids’ Choice awards will be highlighted during the reception and in the Innovation @ Work area located in Lobby B/C of the convention center.

Finalists and recipes are:

  • Alsum Farms & Produce Inc.: Rainbow Potato Pancakes
  • Ball Design: Fresh Fruit Nachos with Honey Yogurt Drizzle
  • Church Bros. LLC: Rainbow Kale Tostada
  • Giorgio Fresh Co.: Mushroom Sauce Pizza with Mozzarella & Cheddar Cheese
  • Green Giant Fresh: Cauliflower & Avocado Croquettes with Honey Dijon & Avocado Aioli
  • Mucci Farms: Cool Summer Treats Made with CUTECUMBERS
  • Sage Fruit Co.: Skinny Breakfast Apple Turnovers
  • Sunkist: Sunkist Orange Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
  • Wholesum Family Farms: Wholesum Harvest Eggplant Vegetable Balls with Roma Tomato Sauce
  • Wish Farms: Wish Farms Strawberry Blueberry Hazelnut Chocolate Flatbread

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Climate change puts wheat crops at risk of disease

There is a risk that severity of epidemics of some wheat diseases may increase within the next ten to twenty years due to the impacts of climate change according to a study by international researchers led by the University of Hertfordshire.

The researchers carried out a survey in China to establish a link between weather and the severity of epidemics of fusarium ear blight on the wheat crops. This weather-based model was then used to predict the impact on severity of the disease of future weather scenarios for the period from 2020 to 2050.

Professor Bruce Fitt, professor of plant pathology at the University of Hertfordshire’s School of Medical and Life Sciences, said: “There is considerable debate about the impact of climate change on crop production — and making sure that we have sufficient food to feed the ever-growing global population is key to our future food security.”

Wheat, one of the world’s most important crops for human food, is milled for use in bread, breakfast cereals, cakes, pizzas, confectionery, soups and many other foodstuffs. Fusarium ear blight is a serious disease affecting wheat across many areas of the world. During severe epidemics, wheat crop losses can be as much as sixty per cent. These losses can become larger as, under certain conditions, the fusarium pathogen produces toxic chemicals known as mycotoxins. The levels of mycotoxins present in the grain may render it unsuitable for either human or animal consumption — the mycotoxin safe levels being controlled by legislation.

Professor Fitt continued: “We know that the weather plays a big part in the development of the disease on the wheat crops — the incidence of the disease is determined by temperature and the occurrence of wet weather at the flowering or anthesis of the wheat crops.”

When the weather-based model developed at Rothamsted Research was used to predict how climate change may affect the wheat crops, it was predicted that wheat flowering dates will generally be earlier and the incidence of the ear blight disease on the wheat crops will substantially increase.

The research suggests that climate change will increase the risk of serious ear blight epidemics on winter wheat in Central China by the middle of this century (2020-2050).

Similar conclusions were reached about impacts of climate change on wheat in the UK, where climate change models are predicting warmer, wetter winters for the country. This suggests that the UK too will suffer a greater incidence of fusarium ear blight on wheat crops — greatly affecting one of our biggest staple crops.

In a world where more than one billion people do not have enough to eat, and our future food security is threatened by climate change and an ever-growing population, it is essential to improve the control of crop diseases like fusarium ear blight around the globe.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Hertfordshire. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Weather puts focus on grocery essentials

This winter’s harsh weather conditions may be having a negative impact on impulse spending at supermarkets, industry analysts told SN last week — although overall the cold and snow may be a positive force for at-home dining. “Severe winter weather pretty much kills trading up,” Andrew Wolf, managing director for BB&T Capital Markets, Boston, said. “Discretionary spending had been making a recovery in 2013, which resulted in stronger sales. But if bad weather …

Why Subscribe To SN Digital Access?

Digital Access gives you unlimited online access to our most premium news and analysis such as Weather puts focus on grocery essentials. This includes in-depth stories and insights from our team of editors and guest writers as well as free eNewsletters, blogs, real-time polls, archives and more. In addition you will also receive a complimentary copy of SN’s salary survey sent to you by email.

Click here to read the FAQ page if you have any questions (opens in a new window)

Attention Paid Print Subscribers:  While you have already been granted free access to SN we ask that you register now. We promise it will only take a few minutes! Or visit your profile and add your print magazine account number and zip code.

Already registered? here.

Supermarket News

Veto puts California governor at odds with citrus industry

California Gov. Jerry Brown’s veto of a bill designed to protect the state’s citrus growers against the spread of Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, has roiled the members of the state’s citrus cooperative.

“His veto of AB 571 is a clear message to our industry that citrus no longer has a home in California,” Joel Nelsen, president of California Citrus Mutual, based in Exeter, said in a statement. “AB 571 passed through four committees and two houses of the state legislature without opposition. The governor vetoed a bill designed to protect Southern California homeowners, the commercial citrus industry, and the pioneering use of biological control to stop the Asian citrus psyllid and deadly citrus disease Huanglongbing.

“He sent the same message 30 years ago with his unwillingness to eradicate the Medfly, and now California’s $ 2 billion iconic citrus industry has been given the same message – that we are not important,” Nelsen added.

The California citrus industry exists significantly in eight counties, employs over 12,000 people and has a foundation of over 3,900 producers, the vast majority of whom are family farmers who ship fresh product from approximately 100 shippers, generating an additional $ 1.5 billion in economic activity.

Citrus growers, packinghouses and their employees submit $ 500 million in general fund support via taxes each year, according to a CCM press release. In terms of fees and permits the industry forwards another $ 112 million to underwrite state government mandates.

“But I guess none of that is important,” Nelsen added.

The California citrus industry has assessed itself over $ 60 million in detection and treatment for the Asian citrus psyllid. The federal government has put forth an estimated $ 40 million in an effort to protect the nation’s top fresh citrus industry.

In Florida, the state has financially partnered with its industry to defend against the devastation of Huanglongbing.

“But not our governor,” Nelsen said. “Governor Brown’s veto of AB 571 sends a clear message to all agriculture stakeholders, that this administration does not care about the citrus industry or California agriculture.”

There are more citrus trees in Southern California backyards than in the entire commercial citrus industry. “Funds from AB 571 were destined for biological control in the Los Angeles Basin,” Nelsen said. “Biological control would reduce the threat of diseased Asian citrus psyllids from infecting back yard trees. That’s how it started in Florida and now over 250,000 acres of prime citrus have been destroyed or abandoned in that state. Brazil has eliminated over 12 million trees because of the disease. Every state in Mexico with citrus is infected with the disease for which there is no known cure. But I guess none of that is important to the governor.”

In his veto message the governor said he wanted to “review our options during the budget process,” which drew a scathing response from the CCM executive.

“The governor’s veto message is laughable!” said Nelsen. “The legislature approved $ 1 million to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, but his Department of Finance will not release the funds.”  

Designed by representatives of the citrus industry in partnership with the scientific community and regulatory bodies at the state and federal level, the California’s effort to stop the Asian citrus psyllid and Huanglongbing has been touted across the country as a vibrant example of private and public sector partnerships.  

“But I guess that’s not important to this governor,” Nelsen said. “His definition of leadership is duplicating the destruction that continues to spread throughout the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Belize and China.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

US: iCropTrak puts food safety on the map

US: iCropTrak puts food safety on the map

In California, harvest crews are busy bringing in crops throughout the state and truck traffic is backed up at weigh scales and processing facilities. “There is a lot of paperwork that accompanies harvest activities,” explained Rob Wood of Cogent3D, Inc. “Harvest crew schedules, time sheets and weigh tags are accompanied by various pre and post harvest inspection and quality assurance documents, plus a substantial regulatory compliance requirement,” he added. 

To ease the paperwork burden, Cogent3D, Inc. has announced the availability of a pre-configured Food Safety module for the iCropTrak iPad and iPhone software. iCropTrak subscribers can now document Food Safety inspections at the farm field using the Primus Labs Pre-Harvest Block Inspection and other protocols. The inspection data is automatically tagged with the inspector credentials and the precise GPS coordinates  for the location of the inspection. “iCropTrak disqualifies any doubt that an inspection was filled out from a shady parking lot rather than at the farm field”, Mr. Wood explained. iCropTrak provides users with instant visual feedback through its map based interface and managers can track inspection activities remotely and see exactly where inspectors are working and what fields have been inspected. The Food Safety module is being offered at no charge to new subscribers who sign up for iCropTrak before September 30th, 2013.

For more information:
Rob Wood
CropTrak
Tel: +1.800.787.8046 ext. 101
Mobile: +1.925.642.3046
Email: [email protected]
www.croptrak.com
http://www.vimeo.com/icroptrak/videos/

Publication date: 9/13/2013


FreshPlaza.com

US: iCropTrak puts food safety on the map

US: iCropTrak puts food safety on the map

In California, harvest crews are busy bringing in crops throughout the state and truck traffic is backed up at weigh scales and processing facilities. “There is a lot of paperwork that accompanies harvest activities,” explained Rob Wood of Cogent3D, Inc. “Harvest crew schedules, time sheets and weigh tags are accompanied by various pre and post harvest inspection and quality assurance documents, plus a substantial regulatory compliance requirement,” he added. 

To ease the paperwork burden, Cogent3D, Inc. has announced the availability of a pre-configured Food Safety module for the iCropTrak iPad and iPhone software. iCropTrak subscribers can now document Food Safety inspections at the farm field using the Primus Labs Pre-Harvest Block Inspection and other protocols. The inspection data is automatically tagged with the inspector credentials and the precise GPS coordinates  for the location of the inspection. “iCropTrak disqualifies any doubt that an inspection was filled out from a shady parking lot rather than at the farm field”, Mr. Wood explained. iCropTrak provides users with instant visual feedback through its map based interface and managers can track inspection activities remotely and see exactly where inspectors are working and what fields have been inspected. The Food Safety module is being offered at no charge to new subscribers who sign up for iCropTrak before September 30th, 2013.

For more information:
Rob Wood
CropTrak
Tel: +1.800.787.8046 ext. 101
Mobile: +1.925.642.3046
Email: [email protected]
www.croptrak.com
http://www.vimeo.com/icroptrak/videos/

Publication date: 9/13/2013


FreshPlaza.com