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Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain spells relief in San Luis Valley

Much-hoped-for rain fell in Colorado’s San Luis Valley this summer, giving the region’s potato producers a much-needed respite from ongoing drought conditions and declining aquifer levels.

“The San Luis Valley has had a decent year so far in terms of surface water flows. For the first time in the last several years, stream flow amounts were near normal through most of the irrigation season,” said Craig Cotton, Div. 3 district engineer with the Colorado State Engineer’s office in Alamosa, CO. “This was due mainly to the wet fall that we experienced last year and the summer monsoons that have occurred recently.”

Earlier this year, Cotton reported that conditions in the Rio Grande River Basin were dire. “We have a low of 66 percent of average to a high of 97 percent of average,” he told The Produce News in early January. “We’re the lowest basin the state.”

Increased precipitation has had a meaningful impact. “Because of this surface water availability, the wells have had to pump less than normal amounts for portions of the season,” Cotton said. “In addition, we have seen an increase in the aquifer levels in the valley. This will aid in the recovery of the aquifers back to a long-term sustainable condition.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Rain spells relief in San Luis Valley

Much-hoped-for rain fell in Colorado’s San Luis Valley this summer, giving the region’s potato producers a much-needed respite from ongoing drought conditions and declining aquifer levels.

“The San Luis Valley has had a decent year so far in terms of surface water flows. For the first time in the last several years, stream flow amounts were near normal through most of the irrigation season,” said Craig Cotton, Div. 3 district engineer with the Colorado State Engineer’s office in Alamosa, CO. “This was due mainly to the wet fall that we experienced last year and the summer monsoons that have occurred recently.”

Earlier this year, Cotton reported that conditions in the Rio Grande River Basin were dire. “We have a low of 66 percent of average to a high of 97 percent of average,” he told The Produce News in early January. “We’re the lowest basin the state.”

Increased precipitation has had a meaningful impact. “Because of this surface water availability, the wells have had to pump less than normal amounts for portions of the season,” Cotton said. “In addition, we have seen an increase in the aquifer levels in the valley. This will aid in the recovery of the aquifers back to a long-term sustainable condition.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Possibly more rain damage for South African grapes

Possibly more rain damage for South African grapes

Unfortunately the country has been hit with more unseasonable rain in the last 2-3 days. It is yet unclear what the influence of the downpours will have on export volumes.

Although exports of South African grapes are down on last year, the situation is not as bad as was expected after the rain and hail earlier in the season.

Total exports are down by just over two million cartons, with Northern Europe being the biggest loser with 1.3 million carton less. Last week total exports were down around 4% on the 2012/13 season. According to SATGI, overall the season is running at 96% compared to last year

Oliphants River and Berg River finished off packing last week, but Hex Valley was still packing large volumes of Crimson Seedless and Sugranineteen, the last Redglobe and the first Dauphine was also being packed.

Publication date: 3/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Torrential rain destroys grapes in South Africa’s Hex River Valley

“between half a million and a million boxes no longer good for export”
Torrential rain destroys grapes in South Africa’s Hex River Valley

Grape growers in the Hex River Valley in South Africa have been again hit by torrential rain. The damage is still being measured but European importers are reporting that there could be between half a million to a million boxes of grapes which are no longer of export quality. “So much rain at this time of the year is very unusual in South Africa and large volumes have been destroyed particularly in the Hex River Valley and also to a lesser extent in the Berg River. When 100 mm of rain falls in South Africa the soil is washed away’ said Gilbert Klingenberg van Exsa Europe.

According to the importer it is mainly Flame and other red varieties which have been hardest hit. “From the white varieties it was the Sugraone that was mostly affected, but it was mainly the red varieties. The later varieties are not yet ripe so the damage may be limited, but the early varieties have been hard hit and are no longer suitable for export. At the very best these will be sold on the local market.”

Gilbert explains that the damage will also affect the price of red grape varieties. “The prices are already around two Euro higher that last week. It is expected that the red grapes will be the scarcest. The price of white grapes has up to now stayed stable. This kind of damage is never good but this has happened at a very bad time. The Namibian season has finished, Argentina and Chile have also had problems and Indian grape won’t be on the market until the end of February.

For more information:
Exsa Europe
Tel: +31 88 735 0003
Mob: +31 620 25 78 11
[email protected]
www.exsaeurope.com

Publication date: 1/15/2014


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US (WA): State cherry crop took beating from rain, then heat

US (WA): State cherry crop took beating from rain, then heat

Heavy rain and now blistering hot weather has made this a year to remember — or maybe quickly forget — for Washington cherry growers.

Recent rain and fickle weather earlier in the year decimated this year’s early Northwest cherry crop and forced many growers to leave split fruit on the tree rather than pay the additional costs of harvest and packing.

Originally estimated as a moderate crop of up to 18 million 20-pound boxes, the crop is now expected to come in at much less than that, probably 13 to 14 million boxes — if late harvest cherries are picked without further weather damage.

“No areas have been spared,” said Roger Pepperl, marketing manager of Stemilt Growers, the nation’s largest packer of sweet cherries. The Wenatchee-based company packs cherries from orchards all over the state.

Some orchards had such a light crop this year, they didn’t have much to lose, he said. Late cherry varieties like Lapins, Skeena and Sweetheart grown in higher areas such as Wenatchee Heights and Stemilt Hill are still in relatively good condition, and harvest should continue into August, said Pepperl.

There’s been great demand for cherries this year after a record 23-million-box crop last year, but packers won’t come close to filling all the orders, Pepperl said.

“It’s been one weather event after another. This will be a year to remember,” he said.

Skins can split
Rain close to harvest is absorbed by the cherries and can cause their skins to split. The effect is worsened in hot weather. Thunderstorms Saturday and Monday included both, following bouts of heavy rain in cooler weather the previous two weeks.

Growers try to dry the cherries between storms by calling in low-flying helicopters or pulling fans or empty sprayers through the orchards. Drying over and over can add greatly to production costs and bruise the fruit. If the fruit is picked, sorting out a high percentage of splits can drive the packing costs higher than returns. Damaged cherries also greatly slows the sorting and packing process.

Lower elevation Bing cherries around Wenatchee have been extensively damaged. Fruit from earlier harvest areas in the state, including the Tri-Cities, Yakima and Mattawa, have also been hard hit by the rain. Orchards around The Dalles and Hood River, Ore., have also been heavily damaged by rain. Cherry marketers try to get stores to put cherries on sale for the Fourth of July and following weekend when harvest is normally at its peak.

Far short of visions
About 4.8 million boxes of cherries had been packed as of Sunday, far short of the 6 to 7 million boxes marketers had hoped to have available by this week, said B.J. Thurlby, president of Northwest Cherry Growers.

Source: www.columbian.com

Publication date: 7/5/2013


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