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Farm Fresh Produce ramps up bell peppers program, cabbage

Farm Fresh Produce ramps up bell peppers program, cabbage

Farm Fresh has 50 acres of peppers. Most of Farm Fresh’s produce is shipped to the East Coast, noted Ceccarelli, because their location in North Carolina gives them cheap freight costs when shipping to markets in the region. Ceccarelli noted that the season hasn’t been the best, but they’re busy providing for their customers.
 
“Peppers have been pretty good so far,” said Ceccarelli. “The market hasn’t been ideal, but we’re keeping our product fresh and our customers happy.”

Farm Fresh Produce is also in the thick of their cabbage program this year. Like with their peppers, Farm Fresh’s cabbage program is focused on East coast markets, which they can reach in about two days from their facilities in North Carolina.

“We’re going to do a lot of cabbage this year,” said Farm Fresh’s Steve Ceccarelli. They began harvesting Napa cabbage at the beginning of last month, and harvesting of regular green cabbage and Flathead cabbage began shortly after. The Napa variety is what Farm Fresh produces the most, with 70 acres dedicated to that kind of cabbage, while 30 acres are dedicated to the Flathead variety.

“We have an advantage from a freight standpoint,” said Ceccarelli. “It’s cheaper for us to ship to the East Coast and the Eastern part of Canada than it is for competitors who aren’t in this region.” Another big program for Farm Fresh is their line of sweet potatoes, which they also predominantly sell on the East Coast. Currently, Farm Fresh has grey, yellow and green sweet potatoes available.

For more information:
Steven A. Ceccarelli
Farm Fresh Produce
Tel: +1 910-508-8933
[email protected]
www.farm-fresh-produce.com

Publication date: 6/28/2013


FreshPlaza.com

US: Apple export season ramps up

With large apple crops expected in several states this year, shippers will begin to figure out what part exports will play this season. One issue will be where and how much of this year’s crop will be sent abroad, but the recent Russian ban on European and American goods will also factor into how this export season pans out. Shipments of apples from the United States to Russia are not a big part of all apple exports, so the ban will not seriously affect American shippers directly. But increased competition from European shippers, looking for new markets to make up for shortfalls in Russia, could increase competition abroad.

“We’re just starting to fill warehouses, making fruit available for the demand that’s there,” said Todd Fryhover, President of the Washington Apple Commission. “So the export side of things is just getting underway.” Most of the apples exported from the United States originate in Washington, and Fryhover noted that, while the export season is just getting started, total apple exports could increase because of a large crop.

“This is going to be a large crop for Washington,” said Fryhover. “It’s more than likely this will be our largest crop, historically, and we’re experiencing relatively flat consumption domestically. As our volumes increase, the export market becomes more important. That’s where we see our growth.” Mexico and Canada are the largest recipients of American apples, but emerging markets in Asia show lots of potential.

“Asia shows promise,” noted Jim Allen of the United States Apple Export Council. “Malaysia and Southeast Asia are showing some growth. The European Union is not showing a lot of growth.” While Europe is not a market with lots of growth potential, it could affect the dynamics of this year’s export season. Russia’s ban on goods from Europe, while not directly affecting the United States, will affect European shippers, who have, in the past, sent significant parts of their crops to Russia. That means European shippers will have to find new markets for their apples or send greater quantities of fruit to existing markets. That could lead to increased competition between American and European shippers.

“Russia, while still a good export market, is a smaller volume export destination for Washington State. Losing the volume we are able to ship to Russia is unfortunate, but it is yet to be seen how this will affect the overall export market for our fruit. Russia only takes select sizes, grades and varieties of apples,” said Eric Borton, vice president of export sales for Borton Fruit in Yakima, Washington. “The largest impact will most likely be the impact felt from more competition from European fruit suppliers. Russia is an important market for many European producers, and with the Russian Ban, these producers will have to look elsewhere to sell their fruit, possibly creating more competition for Washington fruit in other export markets.” Poland, for example, is one of the largest apple exporters in the world. They send over half of their exports to Russia, and with the Russian ban in place, Polish exporters will have to find a home for that excess fruit, possibly in Asia or the Middle East, where U.S. exporters see growth potential.

“Certainly, if you take out that quantity of product, it has to go somewhere, whether domestically or to different markets,” noted Greg Palmer of Multi Fruit USA. “We will also export more, just because of sheer tonnage. But where that fruit is going to go, it’s still to early to tell.” So the current situation is one where everyone agrees the dynamics of global trade in apples will be much different than in years past, but no one knows just how those dynamics will play out. That both the United States and Europe are looking at some of the biggest crops they’ve had will also complicate things, since, not only has the number of export destinations been reduced, but the amount of fruit that needs to find a home in those export markets has increased.

“The Russian ban is still a part of the overall global marketplace and will have an effect, but it is hard to tell at this point how big of an impact the ban will have,” said Borton. “The larger issue at hand is total global apple production, as Russian consumption of the global production is a small piece of this overall. The real question is can the rest of our exportable world markets handle increased volume to offset the loss of the Russian market.”

FreshPlaza.com

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish fresh produce export company Eren Tarim, established in 1993, are right in the middle of a successful minneola season. The holiday season, especially the month of December, is the busiest time of the year and Aysel Oguz from Eren Tarim said that the season has already exceeded the company’s expectations.

Eren exports minneolas to different parts of the world. Also known as a tangelo, this pear shaped variety has very good skin, pulp coloration, along with a wonderful aroma. A hybrid between a mandarin and a grapefruit, the flavour is not too sweet (about 11-13 brix grade) and can even be a bit sour at times. It is said that this mandarin contains high percentage of folic acid which covers about 80% of human needs.

Minneola mandarins are grown in Florida, Turkey and Israel, although Turkish products have always been desirable to customers due to good logistic solutions and the fact that everything is done accordingly to the customer’s demand for quality. It can be shipped for long and short transit times. Along with that, Eren offers different packaging solutions to its customers.

In addition to minneola’s, Eren also offers the mandarin nova, which is a hybrid between the clementine and tangelo. This is also one of the strongest mandarin varieties that  can withstand a long transit. It has very bright orange color and a strong aroma.

The current season is expected to last until the end of January.

For more information:
Aysel OGUZ
Eren Tarim
Tel: +90 324 454 14 87/88
Mob: +90 533 695 58 02
Email: [email protected]
www.erentarim.com

 
 

Publication date: 1/6/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish fresh produce export company Eren Tarim, established in 1993, are right in the middle of a successful minneola season. The holiday season, especially the month of December, is the busiest time of the year and Aysel Oguz from Eren Tarim said that the season has already exceeded the company’s expectations.

Eren exports minneolas to different parts of the world. Also known as a tangelo, this pear shaped variety has very good skin, pulp coloration, along with a wonderful aroma. A hybrid between a mandarin and a grapefruit, the flavour is not too sweet (about 11-13 brix grade) and can even be a bit sour at times. It is said that this mandarin contains high percentage of folic acid which covers about 80% of human needs.

Minneola mandarins are grown in Florida, Turkey and Israel, although Turkish products have always been desirable to customers due to good logistic solutions and the fact that everything is done accordingly to the customer’s demand for quality. It can be shipped for long and short transit times. Along with that, Eren offers different packaging solutions to its customers.

In addition to minneola’s, Eren also offers the mandarin nova, which is a hybrid between the clementine and tangelo. This is also one of the strongest mandarin varieties that  can withstand a long transit. It has very bright orange color and a strong aroma.

The current season is expected to last until the end of January.

For more information:
Aysel OGUZ
Eren Tarim
Tel: +90 324 454 14 87/88
Mob: +90 533 695 58 02
Email: [email protected]
www.erentarim.com

 
 

Publication date: 1/6/2014


FreshPlaza.com