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C.H. Robinson collaboration results in Twin Cities Food Fight

C.H. Robinson has teamed up with Twin Cities NBC affiliate KARE 11 to create a one-day food and fund drive called the KARE 11 Food Fight. The unique collaboration aims to fight hunger in Minnesota with all donations benefitting Second Harvest Heartland. During the 2013 event, more than 860,000 pounds of food was collected.chrob

The Food Fight, which takes place on Tuesday, Nov. 25 from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., pits four KARE 11 anchors — Belinda Jensen, Julie Nelson, Eric Perkins and Randy Shaver — against each other in a friendly competition to see who can collect the most food.

As a co-creator of the event, C.H. Robinson staffs each location throughout the day and provides the transportation needed to collect the donations and deliver them to Second Harvest Heartland. Since 1905, C.H. Robinson has served the food industry through the company’s logistics services and produce business brand, Robinson Fresh. In addition, preventing hunger and providing food assistance are charitable priorities of the C.H. Robinson Foundation. By staffing the Food Fight, and providing employee donations and a monetary gift from the Foundation, C.H. Robinson will donate over 200 volunteer hours and more than 25,000 pounds of food for the event.

“The Food Fight is a creative, fun and festive way for local residents and companies to give back to their own community,” Angie Freeman, vice president of human resources at C.H. Robinson, said in a press release. “Each donation, large or small, allows us to take another step forward in preventing hunger, especially during the holiday season.”

As one of the nation’s larger food banks, Second Harvest Heartland serves more than 530,000 people each year, 33 percent of which are individuals younger than 18 years old. The donations from the Food Fight also lessen the economic burden of purchasing food, since 84 percent of Second Harvest Heartland clients earn less than $ 30,000 per year. For every 1.2 pounds of food donated, Second Harvest Heartland can provide one meal to those Minnesotans experiencing the stress of hunger.

The community-wide competition encourages individuals, companies, and groups to bring food and cash donations to one of the designated locations: Whole Foods in Maple Grove, Byerly’s in Minnetonka, Cub Foods in Eagan and Kowalski’s in Woodbury. Special guests and fun activities will be at all four locations throughout the day.

Individuals can also follow the progress of the event through social media by tracking the following hashtags: #KARE11FoodFight, #TeamBel, #TeamJulie, #TeamPerk and #TeamRandy. For those unable to attend the event, online donations can be made at Second Harvest Heartland’s website.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

UNFI says initiatives boost fiscal results

United Natural Foods, Inc., Providence, R.I., said Wednesday ongoing initiatives to enhance its product offering helped boost financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended Aug. 2.

Steven Spinner, president and CEO of the natural and organic foods distributor, said he believes UNFI is “well-positioned to capitalize on new business opportunities and to continue to pursue additional merger and acquisition opportunities aligned with our strategy and our investment in new capacity.”

Net income for the quarter increased 4.1% to $ 33.4 million, while sales rose 7.4% to $ 1.8 billion; excluding an extra week in the quarter, sales jumped 15.8%.

For the fiscal year net income was up 16.3% to $ 125.5 million, with sales climbing 12% to a record level of $ 6.8 billion; excluding the extra week, sales rose 14.3%.

The company said the acquisition of Tony’s Fine Foods, West Sacramento, Calif., in the fourth quarter and the addition of Trudeau Foods, Burnsville, Minn., in the first quarter boosted sales by approximately $ 64 million.

Net income for the year included a gain of $ 4.8 million associated with a non-cash transfer of land at the company’s Racine, Wis., facility. UNFI said it incurred costs of approximately $ 1.4 million related to the startup of the Racine facility; $ 800,000 related to the startup of a facility in New York’s Hudson Valley; and $ 1.5 million in costs related to the acquisition of Tony’s. 


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It also said it incurred a cost of approximately $ 6.3 million in expenses related to a labor action at its Auburn, Wash., facility and $ 1.6 million related to the termination of a licensing agreement and the write-down of the associated intangible asset.

The company experienced improved execution during the year on procurement and inbound logistics within its supply chain group, it noted.

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New stores pace Fresh Market Q2 results

The Fresh Market on Thursday said sales from new stores exceeded expectations and helped the specialty retailer post sales and earnings slightly ahead of analyst estimates during the fiscal second quarter.

Net sales for the period, which ended July 27, increased 19% to $ 422.2 million, and comparable store sales improved by 2.9% reflecting a 2.7% increase in the number of transactions and a 0.2% increase in average transaction size. Gross margin as a percent of sales decreased slightly to 34% from 34.2% in the same period last year. Net earnings of $ 11.4 million decreased by 27.1% from the same period a year ago, reflecting impairment and store closing costs for stores in Texas and California.

Adjusted for those expenses, per-share earnings of 36 cents came in a penny ahead of analyst estimates for the quarter.


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In a statement, Craig Carlock said new stores helped drive the sales gain, and said the chain would look to increase its store count in the Southeast: “The performance of our new stores exceeded our expectations and we see tremendous expansion opportunities in our core markets. Based on a recent white space analysis, we are raising our store growth potential in the Southeastern United States to double our current store base in this region. We are encouraged by our first half results and believe we are well positioned to achieve our strategic and financial objectives for the year as we further expand our store base and enhance our customer offerings.”

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Preliminary Test Results Indicate E. coli Came From Petting Zoo at County Fair

Preliminary test results indicate that the source of at least eight cases of E. coli O157:H7 (with five hospitalized) was a traveling petting zoo, the Minnesota Department of Health said Friday.

Department officials reportedly took samples from animals from the Zerebko Zoo Tran petting zoo in Bovey, which was at the Rice County Fair last month in Faribault, MN.

Eight E. coli cases were confirmed by the department between July 9-24, although a local hospital reported nine cases in Rice County. Health officials only know about such cases if they receive a hotline call or a doctor submits stool samples from a patient.

The next step is more testing to determine the sub-strain of E. coli O157:H7 involved, the department said, with official results expected next week.

Wally Zerebko, owner of the petting zoo, noted that the preliminary test results were inconclusive and that subsequent fair visits he made with his animals didn’t result in any E. coli cases. However, Carrie Klumb with the state health department said that all of the E. coli cases there shared having contact with an animal.

A number of disease outbreaks have been linked to petting zoos in recent years. In 2012, the petting zoo at a county fair in North Carolina was linked to an E. coli outbreak that sickened 106 people and ended in the death of a 2-year-old boy.

Parents are advised to carefully monitor their children when petting farm animals. Children should immediately wash their hands after visiting a petting zoo and should not be given the opportunity to put their hands or fingers in their mouths after touching animals.

Food Safety News

Acquisitions, shutdowns impact Roundy’s Q2 results

Roundy’s said acquisitions in Chicago and store closures in Minneapolis had a negative impact on financial results for the second quarter and first half ended June 28, though sales on continuing operations were up.

Robert A. Mariano, chairman, president and CEO, said he is confident “the strategic actions we started in the second quarter will improve our cost structure, operational efficiency and overall execution to provide positive long-term benefits to our business.”

The company said factors that had a negative impact on results included the sale of 18 Rainbow stores in Minneapolis and the closing of nine others; cost containment initiatives; plans to close its distribution center in Stevens Point, Wis., in the third quarter; and start-up costs related to the acquisition of 13 Dominick’s stores from Safeway.

For the 13-week quarter Roundy’s had a net loss on continuing operations of $ 13.5 million, compared with net income of $ 11.6 million in the year-ago quarter, while sales from continuing operations rose 11.9% to $ 971.9 million and same-store sales excluding the Rainbow stores fell 2.2%. With the nine Rainbow stores that were not sold during the quarter, comps were down 2.8%.

Adjusted EBITDA for the quarter fell 39.6% to $ 26.9 million.

The company said it experienced a 3.4% decline in customer transactions during the quarter and a 1.2% increase in average transaction size. It also said comps continue to be negatively impacted by competitive store openings and the weak economic environment in core markets, though it benefited from the shift of Easter to this year’s second quarter.


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For the half the net loss was $ 20 million, compared with net income of $ 17.4 million a year ago. Sales on continuing operations rose 7.5% for the quarter to $ 1.9 billion, while same-store sales, excluding the Rainbows, fell 3.3% — reflecting a 5.3% drop in customer transactions and a 2% increase in average transaction size; including the nine Rainbows that were not sold, comps fell 3.9% for the half.

Adjusted EBITDA for the half fell 32.7% to $ 54.6 million.

When it closes the Stevens Point warehouse, Roundy’s said it will consolidate distribution through its Oconomowoc facility “to maximize distribution efficiencies.”

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Acquisitions, shutdowns impact Roundy’s Q2 results

Roundy’s said acquisitions in Chicago and store closures in Minneapolis had a negative impact on financial results for the second quarter and first half ended June 28, though sales on continuing operations were up.

Robert A. Mariano, chairman, president and CEO, said he is confident “the strategic actions we started in the second quarter will improve our cost structure, operational efficiency and overall execution to provide positive long-term benefits to our business.”

The company said factors that had a negative impact on results included the sale of 18 Rainbow stores in Minneapolis and the closing of nine others; cost containment initiatives; plans to close its distribution center in Stevens Point, Wis., in the third quarter; and start-up costs related to the acquisition of 13 Dominick’s stores from Safeway.

For the 13-week quarter Roundy’s had a net loss on continuing operations of $ 13.5 million, compared with net income of $ 11.6 million in the year-ago quarter, while sales from continuing operations rose 11.9% to $ 971.9 million and same-store sales excluding the Rainbow stores fell 2.2%. With the nine Rainbow stores that were not sold during the quarter, comps were down 2.8%.

Adjusted EBITDA for the quarter fell 39.6% to $ 26.9 million.

The company said it experienced a 3.4% decline in customer transactions during the quarter and a 1.2% increase in average transaction size. It also said comps continue to be negatively impacted by competitive store openings and the weak economic environment in core markets, though it benefited from the shift of Easter to this year’s second quarter.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


For the half the net loss was $ 20 million, compared with net income of $ 17.4 million a year ago. Sales on continuing operations rose 7.5% for the quarter to $ 1.9 billion, while same-store sales, excluding the Rainbows, fell 3.3% — reflecting a 5.3% drop in customer transactions and a 2% increase in average transaction size; including the nine Rainbows that were not sold, comps fell 3.9% for the half.

Adjusted EBITDA for the half fell 32.7% to $ 54.6 million.

When it closes the Stevens Point warehouse, Roundy’s said it will consolidate distribution through its Oconomowoc facility “to maximize distribution efficiencies.”

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Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

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