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Agave Dream cappuccino ice cream recalled for Listeria risk

Agave Dream ice creamAgave Dream of Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, is recalling 389 cases of its cappuccino ice cream because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The company stated that the recalled item was distributed nationally through retail stores receiving product from KeHE Distributors’ Romeoville, IL, warehouse, DPI Northwest; Americold in Los Angeles; IWI’s Franklin, IN, warehouse, and Haddon House, Richburg, SC.

The recalled product consists of pints of Agave Dream cappuccino ice cream packed in brown paper, 1-pint containers with “Agave Dream” printed on the front of the carton and with a best-by date of 07/04/17 and a UPC number of 899349002048.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall is the result of a routine sampling by the state of Washington, which revealed that the finished products contained Listeria bacteria. The company has ceased production and distribution of the product while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the company continue their investigation into what caused the problem.

Consumers who have purchased Agave Dream cappuccino ice cream with a best-by date 07/04/17 are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 866-993-4438 or by sending email to [email protected].

Listeria is a microscopic organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

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Full Tilt Recalls Most 2014 Dairy-Based Ice Cream Flavors for Listeria Risk

Full Tilt Ice Cream of Seattle is recalling all dairy-based ice-cream flavors (except non-dairy frozen desserts) sold under the Full Tilt brand and produced between Jan. 1 and Dec. 19, 2014, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The Full Tilt dairy-based ice-cream products were distributed in Oregon and Washington through grocery stores and retail scoop shops.

The ice cream was sold in 16-oz. paper containers with a 7-digit code ending in 14x (e.g., 0219142), as well as 1.5-gallon and 3-gallon plastic gallon tubs produced before 12/19/2014. The following table summarizes the affected products:

Name of product size production dates type of packaging
Full Tilt Ice Cream 16-oz. containers 01/01/2014-12/19/2014 paper
Full Tilt Ice Cream 1.5-gallon containers 01/01/2014-12/19/2014 plastic gallon
Full Tilt Ice Cream 3-gallon containers 01/01/2014-12/19/2014 plastic gallon

No illnesses have been reported to date.

These dairy-based ice-cream products contain ice-cream base produced and recalled by Snoqualmie Gourmet Ice Cream Inc. as an ingredient. Full Tilt has since performed a rigorous sanitation schedule to prevent further contamination.

This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Consumers who have purchased Full Tilt are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (206) 963-5038 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

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WA Ice Cream Company Recalls All 2014 Flavors Except One for Listeria Risk

Pink’s Ice Cream LLC of Seattle is recalling all ice-cream flavors produced in 2014 with the exception of Coconut Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Pink’s Ice Cream was distributed through grocery stores and restaurants around the Puget Sound area, including Uwajimaya and Metropolitan Market outlets.

The 16-oz. pints of ice cream are sold with a six-digit numerical product code on the bottom of the product. That six digit code will start with two numbers between 00**** and 52****.  The recall includes all codes within that range with the exclusion of 01**** and 41****. The table below summarizes the affected products.

Name of Product Flavors Size Production Date Type of Packaging
Pink’s Ice Cream Black Sesame, Durian, Green Tea, Mango, Red Bean, Spicy Ginger, Taro, Thai Tea 16 oz 1/1/14-12/21/14 Paper Carton
Pink’s Ice Cream Black Sesame, Durian, Green Tea, Mango, Red Bean, Spicy Ginger, Taro, Thai Tea 1.0 gal 1/1/14-12/21/14 Plastic Gallon

The recall is the result of contamination found at Snoqualmie Gourmet Ice Cream, Pink’s dairy supplier. A routine sampling revealed traces of Listeria in the finished product and on nearby surfaces at the supplier’s plant. Pink’s Ice Cream has recalled all products made with potentially contaminated dairy ingredient, sterilized all production surfaces and equipment, and has begun sourcing dairy from an alternative source.

No illnesses related to the consumption of Pink’s Ice Cream products have been reported to date. This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Consumers who have purchased Pink’s Ice Cream, except the non-dairy Coconut, are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (206) 861-9098 during regular business hours (Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST).

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Jump Your Bones Brand Kangaroo Meat Pet Treats Recalled for Salmonella Risk

Jump Your Bones, Inc. of Boca Raton, FL is recalling Jump Your Bones brand name “Roo Bites (Cubes)” due to potential Salmonella contamination. The pet treat product is made from dehydrated kangaroo meat.

Salmonella can sicken animals that eat contaminated products. Humans are at risk of contracting illness from handling contaminated pet products, especially those who do not thoroughly wash their hands after touching the products or any surfaces that touch the products.

The affected lots of Jump Your Bones Pet Treats were distributed to retail pet food stores nationwide and through pet food retailers and distributors, as well as online stores.

The recalls affects all products bearing the following UPC:

  • 63633010041 for 80g. / 2.82oz. including samples of .32 oz.
No illnesses have been associated with the recalled product. However, due to the time required to trace an illness back to a specific food product, it is impossible to say whether or not any illnesses have occurred.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection in humans include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever, and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Consumers who have purchased the recalled pet treats are urged to stop feeding them to pets and either dispose of the product return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Food Safety News

Merb’s Candies Recalls Caramel Apples for Potential Listeria Risk

Merb’s Candies of St. Louis, MO, is recalling its Bionic Apples and Double Dipped Apples because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The company’s Bionic Apples and Double Dipped Apples were available for retail sales at St. Louis area locations, through local supermarkets (located in the produce section), and through mail orders nationwide.

The product is individually packaged in a clear burgundy-and-gold cellophane bag and would have been available from Sept. 8 through Nov. 25, 2014. No identifying lot codes were used.

Merb’s Candies has been working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its investigation of the current outbreak of Listeriosis, which has been associated with caramel apples.

Bidart Brothers of Shafter, CA, which is one of Merb’s Candies apple suppliers, has initiated a recall as there may be a connection between this outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes and apples supplied to Merb’s Candies.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has noted 29 illnesses in 10 states linked to the outbreak, and the agency has advised consumers not to eat commercially produced, pre-packaged caramel apples until more is known.

Production of Merb’s Candies’ caramel apples ceased as of Nov. 23 2014, and the caramel apples produced are no longer available for purchase. However, the company recommends that any consumers who are still in possession of caramel apples follow CDC’s advice and dispose of the product in a secure container to avoid potential contamination to animals.

Consumers who have any of the recalled product may return it to the store where purchased or dispose of it per the advice of the CDC. Consumers with questions may email the firm at [email protected] or call (314) 832-7206 during normal business hours Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

California Snack Foods Recalls Caramel Apples for Potential Listeria Risk

California Snack Foods Inc. of South El Monte, CA, is issuing a voluntary recall of California Snack Foods brand caramel apples with a best use by date between Aug. 15 and Nov. 28, 2014, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

California Snack Foods caramel apples are sold in single packs and three packs, and each package will have a best use by date on the front of the label.

They were available for retail sale through grocery, discount and club stores, generally in the produce section, and were distributed to retailers in the following states: Arizona, California, Nevada, Texas and Utah.

Company officials have been working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its investigation of the current outbreak of Listeriosis, which has been associated with caramel apples. California Snack Foods recently received notice from Bidart Brothers of Shafter, CA, one of its apple suppliers, that there may be a connection between this outbreak and the apples that they supplied to the company’s facility.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has noted 29 illnesses in 10 states linked to the outbreak, and the agency has advised consumers not to eat commercially produced, pre-packaged caramel apples until more is known.

California Snack Foods officials said they used the last of the Bidart Brothers apples in the first week of November 2014, and that the caramel apples produced with Bidart Brothers apples should no longer be available in stores. However, the company recommends that consumers follow the advice of CDC and remove any caramel apples in storage and dispose of them in a secure container to avoid potential contamination in animals.

Consumers who have any product may return it to the store where purchased or dispose of it per the advice of CDC. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 800-966-5501, Monday through Friday during normal business hours, or via email to [email protected]

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Happy Apple Brand Caramel Apples Recalled for Possible Listeria Risk

Happy Apple Company of Washington, MO, has issued a voluntary recall of Happy Apple Brand caramel apples with a best use by date between Aug. 25 and Nov. 23, 2014, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Happy Apple caramel apples are sold in single pack, three packs, four packs and eight packs, and each package will have a best use by date on the front of the label.

The apples were available for retail sale through grocery, discount and club stores, generally in the produce section, and were distributed to retailers in the following states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin.

The company has been working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its investigation of the current outbreak of Listeriosis, which has been associated with caramel apples. Happy Apple recently received notice from Bidart Brothers, one of its apple suppliers to the company’s California facility, that there may be a connection between this outbreak and the apples supplied to that facility.

As has been reported in the news, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has noted 29 illnesses in 10 states linked to the outbreak, and the agency has advised consumers not to eat commercially produced, pre-packaged caramel apples until more is known.

Happy Apple ceased operations at the end of October as part of its normal, seasonal shutdown, and the caramel apples produced are no longer available in stores. However, the company is recommending that consumers follow the advice of CDC and remove any caramel apples in storage and dispose of them in a secure container to avoid potential contamination in animals.

Consumers who have any of the product may return it to the store where purchased or dispose of it per the advice of the CDC. Consumers with questions may contact Happy Apple at 800-527-7532, Monday through Friday during normal business hours, or via email to [email protected].

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

MI Raw Milk Cheddar Cheese Recalled for Potential Listeria Risk

Farm Country Cheese House of Lakeview, MI, is recalling about 1,136 pounds of Raw Milk Cheddar because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The Raw Milk Cheddar was distributed in Michigan, specifically in the Grand Rapids and Detroit metro areas, through retail stores and specialty shops.

The Raw Milk Cheddar in question is packaged under two different labels. The first label will have Farm Country Cheese House logo on the far left-hand side, and the product name (Raw Milk Cheddar) will be written on top of the label. This product is sold as an 8-oz. block.

This product has a “Use By Date” on the back of the cheese. The dates are between Oct. 28, 2015, and Dec. 5, 2015. This label will also have a Julian Date in the lower right-hand corner. These Julian dates are as follows: 14301, 14302, 14308, 14309, 14324, 14325, 14332, 14336, and 14339.

The second label will have Farm Country Cheese House logo on the far left-hand side, and the product name (Raw Milk Cheddar) written in white over a light-blue banner. This label will have the “Use By Date” on the back; it will not have a Julian Date. The “Use By Date” dates are between Oct. 28, 2015, and Dec. 5, 2015. This product will be packaged in 8-oz. blocks and 5-lb. loafs.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was the result of a routine sampling program by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which revealed that the finished products contained the bacteria. Farm Country Cheese House has ceased production and distribution of the product while FDA and the company continue their investigation into to what caused the problem.

Consumers who have purchased Farm Country Cheese House Raw Milk Cheddar are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (989) 352-7779, or email to [email protected], Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Nutrition Bars Recalled for Salmonella Risk

San Diego-based Perfect Bar & Company is recalling specific lots of its Peanut Butter and Cranberry Crunch nutrition bar products due to a Salmonella risk.

The recalled products have packaging and/or wrappers with the expiration date and lot codes listed below. The recalled product has reached the distributor, retail and end-user level.

While no illnesses to date have been associated with any of the recalled products, Salmonella bacteria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps. Consumers with the above symptoms should consult their physician.

Anyone who purchased the recalled products are advised to dispose of them immediately.

Product photos below:

Individual Label Perfect Bar Peanut Butter and Cranberry Crunch nutrition bars

Carton label, Peanut Butter and Cranberry Crunch nutrition bars

Gluten Free Variety Carton, Peanut Butter, Cranberry Crunch, Almond Butter

Food Safety News

Soybean and Mungbean Sprouts Recalled in WA and OR for Listeria Risk

Kkot Saem Sprouts, Inc. of Spanaway, Washington is voluntarily recalling Soybean Sprouts and Mungbean Sprouts sold under brand names Kkot Saem, Winter Blossom Bean Sprouts, and Winter Blossom because the sprouts may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The products were distributed at H-Mart in Washington and Oregon, and G-Mart in Oregon.

The last date of distribution was December 16, 2014. The mungbean sprouts have a five-day shelf life from the packing date and soybean sprouts have a shelf life of up to two weeks from the packing date.

The recalled products are as follows:

The contamination was detected during routine testing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

No illnesses have been reported in connection to the products. However, due to the time required to trace an illness back to a specific food product, it is impossible to say if any illnesses have occurred.

Customers who have purchased the recalled products are urged to return them to the place of purchase or discard them.

Product labels:

Front Label, Kkot Saem, Mung Bean Sprouts, 0.8 lb.

Front Label, Winter Blossom Bean Sprouts, Soy Bean Sprouts, 1.5 lbs.

Food Safety News

1,200 Pounds of Ground Beef Recalled Due to E. coli Risk

Ranchers Legacy Meat Co., of Vadnais Heights, Minn., is recalling 1,200 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coliO157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Products subject to the recall are packaged in plastic cryovac sealed packets, and contain various weights of ground beef.  All products produced on Nov. 19, 2014 are subject to recall.

All of the following have a Package Code (use by) 12/10/2014 and bear the establishment number “Est. 40264” inside the USDA mark of inspection. Individual products include:

  • Ranchers Legacy Ground Beef Patties 77/23
  • Ranchers Legacy Ground Chuck Patties 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy USDA Choice Ground Beef 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy USDA Choice WD Beef Patties 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy RD Beef Patties 80/20
  • OTG Manufacturing Chuck/Brisket RD Patties
  • Ranchers Legacy Chuck Blend Oval Beef Patties
  • Ranchers Legacy WD Chuck Blend Patties
  • Ranchers Legacy USDA Choice NAT Beef Patties 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy NAT Beef Patties 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy USDA Choice NAT Beef Patties 80/20
  • Ranchers Legacy Ground Chuck Blend
  • Ranchers Legacy Chuck Blend Bulk Pack NAT Patties
  • Ranchers Legacy Chuck Blend NAT Beef Patties

The product was discovered by FSIS inspection personnel during a routine inspection. Products testing positive on November 21, 2014 were held at the establishment.  The products being recalled were produced on the same day and equipment as the positive product.  Products were shipped to distributors for sales nationwide.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

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Tomalley Spread Recalled in Canada for Clostridium Botulinum Risk

Fruits de Mer Madeleine Inc. is recalling Madeleine brand Tomalley Spread from the marketplace because it may permit the growth of Clostridium botulinum.

Consumers should not consume the recalled product which was sold in 80 g containers with a UPC of 6 87090 30020 5.

Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, blurred or double vision, dry mouth, respiratory failure and paralysis. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

This recall was triggered by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) inspection activities. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled products from the marketplace.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food Safety News

Italian Meatless Pasta Sauce Recalled for Potential Botulism Risk

Tullia’s of Spokane, WA, is recalling Italian Meatless Pasta Sauce code 530140. This recall has been initiated because a records review by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed that one batch of sauce produced with the 530140 code had a pH level high enough to allow the growth of Clostridium botulinum. If present, this organism can cause botulism, a serious and potentially fatal foodborne illness.

The recalled sauce is packaged in 16 oz. and 32 oz. clear glass bottles with white caps. The code can be found on the label and is in blue ink. The only code of Tullia’s Italian Meatless Pasta Sauce being recalled is 530140.

The recalled sauce was sold in the following markets in the Spokane area: Rosauer’s, Yoke’s, Egger’s (West Rosewood), Trading Company Stores (Spokane), Main Market and Albertson’s (Wandermere Mall).

Tullia’s has made the decision to recall this product to ensure the safety of their customers. The company has not been notified of any illness associated with their products.

Foodborne botulism is a severe type of food poisoning caused by the ingestion of foods containing the potent neurotoxin formed during growth of the organism. Foodborne botulism can cause the following symptoms: general weakness, dizziness, double vision and trouble with speaking or swallowing. Difficulty in breathing, weakness of other muscles, abdominal distention and constipation may also be common symptoms. People experiencing these problems should seek immediate medical attention. Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled

Consumers who have purchased the recalled sauce are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a refund or replacement. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 509-879-0325 during the hours of 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. PDT.

Food Safety News

Virginia Officials Warn of Botulism Risk from Corfinio Soups, Sauces

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is warning consumers not to eat any canned soups or sauces made by Corfinio Foods of Richmond, VA, because they were improperly processed and therefore susceptible to contamination with Clostridium botulinum.

Ingestion of botulism toxin from improperly processed jarred and canned foods may lead to serious illness and death. Although there have been no reported cases of illness associated with these products, the department stated that it was issuing a consumer warning so that people who have previously purchased the products do not consume them.

According to Virginia food safety officials, Corfinio Foods has already suspended production of all of its canned soups and sauces, and the firm is currently working to come into compliance with state requirements.

The soups and sauces are packaged in glass, Mason-style jars with metal, screw-on lids and have been sold at the Brandermill Green Market in Midlothian, VA. The jars are marked with the Corfinio Foods label.

Consumers who have any of these products or any foods made with these products should discard them immediately. They should double-bag the jars in plastic bags and place in a trash receptacle for non-recyclable trash. Those who don’t wear gloves when handling these products should wash their hands with soap and running water after handling.

Botulism toxin is odorless and colorless. It is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The initial symptoms frequently experienced are double or blurred vision, drooping eyelids and dry or sore throat. Progressive descending paralysis, usually symmetrical, may follow. Infants with botulism appear lethargic, feed poorly, are constipated, and have a weak cry and poor muscle tone.

Food Safety News

Virginia Officials Warn of Botulism Risk from Corfinio Soups, Sauces

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is warning consumers not to eat any canned soups or sauces made by Corfinio Foods of Richmond, VA, because they were improperly processed and therefore susceptible to contamination with Clostridium botulinum.

Ingestion of botulism toxin from improperly processed jarred and canned foods may lead to serious illness and death. Although there have been no reported cases of illness associated with these products, the department stated that it was issuing a consumer warning so that people who have previously purchased the products do not consume them.

According to Virginia food safety officials, Corfinio Foods has already suspended production of all of its canned soups and sauces, and the firm is currently working to come into compliance with state requirements.

The soups and sauces are packaged in glass, Mason-style jars with metal, screw-on lids and have been sold at the Brandermill Green Market in Midlothian, VA. The jars are marked with the Corfinio Foods label.

Consumers who have any of these products or any foods made with these products should discard them immediately. They should double-bag the jars in plastic bags and place in a trash receptacle for non-recyclable trash. Those who don’t wear gloves when handling these products should wash their hands with soap and running water after handling.

Botulism toxin is odorless and colorless. It is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The initial symptoms frequently experienced are double or blurred vision, drooping eyelids and dry or sore throat. Progressive descending paralysis, usually symmetrical, may follow. Infants with botulism appear lethargic, feed poorly, are constipated, and have a weak cry and poor muscle tone.

Food Safety News

How Health and Food Safety Risk Communicators Can Engage Social Media

“With the ubiquitous nature of social media in current society, health and food safety risk communicators should be taking advantage of these platforms to provide information and engage the public,” reads a recent article in the journal Perspectives in Public Health.

To help health information providers navigate social media, researchers at North Carolina State University reviewed current research on its use in public health settings and suggested frameworks for developing social media strategies.

The authors say it’s important for public health organizations to use sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in a collaborative way rather a one-way broadcast of information. Some studies have found that participation in lifestyle interventions corresponds with the level of participation in a Facebook group.

Social media can also be useful in responding to questions, creating events such as online chats, and engaging other organizations.

“Social media influences how individuals obtain information, and the amount of time spent on social media applications is rising at a rate three times faster than the increase of time spent on the Internet overall,” the authors say.

When it comes to frameworks for social media interaction, health promotion interventions delivered via the Internet can be more successful if they are based on theories of social and behavioral change like the theory of reasoned action/planned behavior.

Encouraging people to align with their peers through comment sections or competitions and sharing personal narratives are other helpful strategies.

Very little research has been done on the possible uses of social media in conveying risk related to foodborne illness, the authors say, but add that it could be used similarly to other areas of public health.

The article lists speed, accessibility and interactivity as the benefits of social media when raising awareness about an issue. However, lack of control in ensuring the accuracy of information and possible information overload are two of the pitfalls.

When government agencies, academics and companies try to engage the public on food safety via social media, the article states that real-time dialogue and communities where discussion is already happening are important to keep in mind.

And, more than anything else, the authors say that “establishing and maintaining trust remains at the core of successful social media engagement.”

Food Safety News

How Health and Food Safety Risk Communicators Can Engage Social Media

“With the ubiquitous nature of social media in current society, health and food safety risk communicators should be taking advantage of these platforms to provide information and engage the public,” reads a recent article in the journal Perspectives in Public Health.

To help health information providers navigate social media, researchers at North Carolina State University reviewed current research on its use in public health settings and suggested frameworks for developing social media strategies.

The authors say it’s important for public health organizations to use sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in a collaborative way rather a one-way broadcast of information. Some studies have found that participation in lifestyle interventions corresponds with the level of participation in a Facebook group.

Social media can also be useful in responding to questions, creating events such as online chats, and engaging other organizations.

“Social media influences how individuals obtain information, and the amount of time spent on social media applications is rising at a rate three times faster than the increase of time spent on the Internet overall,” the authors say.

When it comes to frameworks for social media interaction, health promotion interventions delivered via the Internet can be more successful if they are based on theories of social and behavioral change like the theory of reasoned action/planned behavior.

Encouraging people to align with their peers through comment sections or competitions and sharing personal narratives are other helpful strategies.

Very little research has been done on the possible uses of social media in conveying risk related to foodborne illness, the authors say, but add that it could be used similarly to other areas of public health.

The article lists speed, accessibility and interactivity as the benefits of social media when raising awareness about an issue. However, lack of control in ensuring the accuracy of information and possible information overload are two of the pitfalls.

When government agencies, academics and companies try to engage the public on food safety via social media, the article states that real-time dialogue and communities where discussion is already happening are important to keep in mind.

And, more than anything else, the authors say that “establishing and maintaining trust remains at the core of successful social media engagement.”

Food Safety News

How Health and Food Safety Risk Communicators Can Engage Social Media

“With the ubiquitous nature of social media in current society, health and food safety risk communicators should be taking advantage of these platforms to provide information and engage the public,” reads a recent article in the journal Perspectives in Public Health.

To help health information providers navigate social media, researchers at North Carolina State University reviewed current research on its use in public health settings and suggested frameworks for developing social media strategies.

The authors say it’s important for public health organizations to use sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in a collaborative way rather a one-way broadcast of information. Some studies have found that participation in lifestyle interventions corresponds with the level of participation in a Facebook group.

Social media can also be useful in responding to questions, creating events such as online chats, and engaging other organizations.

“Social media influences how individuals obtain information, and the amount of time spent on social media applications is rising at a rate three times faster than the increase of time spent on the Internet overall,” the authors say.

When it comes to frameworks for social media interaction, health promotion interventions delivered via the Internet can be more successful if they are based on theories of social and behavioral change like the theory of reasoned action/planned behavior.

Encouraging people to align with their peers through comment sections or competitions and sharing personal narratives are other helpful strategies.

Very little research has been done on the possible uses of social media in conveying risk related to foodborne illness, the authors say, but add that it could be used similarly to other areas of public health.

The article lists speed, accessibility and interactivity as the benefits of social media when raising awareness about an issue. However, lack of control in ensuring the accuracy of information and possible information overload are two of the pitfalls.

When government agencies, academics and companies try to engage the public on food safety via social media, the article states that real-time dialogue and communities where discussion is already happening are important to keep in mind.

And, more than anything else, the authors say that “establishing and maintaining trust remains at the core of successful social media engagement.”

Food Safety News

California Firm Recalls Jarred Food Products for Botulism Risk

VR Green Farms of San Clemente, CA, is voluntarily recalling a variety of its jarred food products because they may have been improperly produced, therefore making them susceptible to contamination by Clostridium botulinum.

The recalled products include Pine Nut Basil Pesto, Pickled Farm Mix, Old World Tomato Sauce, Sundried Tomatoes in Olive Oil, Tuscan Grilling Sauce and Pasta Sauce. Photographs of these products can be found here. The products were sold at the VR Green Farms stand in San Clemente, CA, and via the Internet to consumers throughout the United States.

Ingestion of botulism toxin from improperly processed jarred and canned foods may lead to serious illness and death. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is coordinating with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Ohio Department of Health in the investigation of two cases of suspected foodborne botulism infections that may be associated with consumption of the firm’s Pine Nut Basil Pesto.

Botulism toxin is odorless and colorless. Consumers who have any of these products or any foods made with these products should discard them immediately. Double-bag the jars in plastic bags and place in a trash receptacle for non-recyclable trash. Wear gloves when handling these products or wash your hands with soap and running water afterward.

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The initial symptoms frequently experienced are double or blurred vision, drooping eyelids, and dry or sore throat. Progressive descending paralysis, usually symmetrical, may follow. Infants with botulism appear lethargic, feed poorly, are constipated, have a weak cry and poor muscle tone.

CDPH recommends that anyone experiencing ill effects after consuming these products should consult their health care provider. Consumers who observe the product being offered for sale should report the activity to CDPH at (800) 495-3232.

Food Safety News

Climate Change Increases Risk of Crop Slowdown in Next 20 Years

The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global crop yields because of climate change, new research finds.

The authors, from Stanford University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), say the odds of a major production slowdown of wheat and corn even with a warming climate are not very high. But the risk is about 20 times more significant than it would be without global warming, and it may require planning by organizations that are affected by international food availability and price.

“Climate change has substantially increased the prospect that crop production will fail to keep up with rising demand in the next 20 years,” said NCAR scientist Claudia Tebaldi, a co-author of the study.

Stanford professor David Lobell said he wanted to study the potential impact of climate change on agriculture in the next two decades because of questions he has received from stakeholders and decision makers in governments and the private sector.

“I’m often asked whether climate change will threaten food supply, as if it’s a simple yes or no answer,” Lobell said. “The truth is that over a 10- or 20-year period, it depends largely on how fast Earth warms, and we can’t predict the pace of warming very precisely. So the best we can do is try to determine the odds.”

Lobell and Tebaldi used computer models of global climate, as well as data about weather and crops, to calculate the chances that climatic trends would have a negative effect of 10 percent on yields of corn and wheat in the next 20 years. This would have a major impact on food supply. Yields would continue to increase but the slowdown would effectively cut the projected rate of increase by about half at the same time that demand is projected to grow sharply.

They found that the likelihood of natural climate shifts causing such a slowdown over the next 20 years is only 1 in 200. But when the authors accounted for human-induced global warming, they found that the odds jumped to 1 in 10 for corn and 1 in 20 for wheat.

The study appears in this month’s issue of Environmental Research Letters. It was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which is NCAR’s sponsor, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

More crops needed worldwide

Global yields of crops such as corn and wheat have typically increased by about 1-2 percent per year in recent decades, and the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization projects that global production of major crops will increase by 13 percent per decade through 2030 — likely the fastest rate of increase during the coming century. However, global demand for crops is also expected to rise rapidly during the next two decades because of population growth, greater per-capita food consumption, and increasing use of biofuels.

Lobell and Tebaldi set out to estimate the odds that climate change could interfere with the ability of crop producers to keep up with demand. Whereas other climate research had looked at the crop impacts that were most likely, Lobell and Tebaldi decided to focus on the less likely but potentially more dangerous scenario that climate change would reduce yield growth by 10 percent or more.

The researchers used simulations available from an NCAR-based climate model (developed by teams of scientists with support from NSF and DOE), as well as several other models, to provide trends in temperature and precipitation over the next two decades for crop-intensive regions under a scenario of increasing carbon dioxide. They also used the same model simulations without human-caused increases in carbon dioxide to assess the same trends in a natural climate.

In addition, they ran statistical analyses to estimate the impacts of changes in temperature and precipitation on wheat and corn yields in various regions of the globe and during specific times of the year that coincide with the most important times of the growing seasons for those two crops.

The authors quantified the extent to which warming temperatures would correlate with reduced yields. For example, an increase of 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) would slow corn yields by 7 percent and wheat yields by 6 percent. Depending on the crop-growing region, the odds of such a temperature increase in the next 20 years were about 30 to 40 percent in simulations that included increases in carbon dioxide. In contrast, such temperature increases had a much lower chance of occurring in stimulations that included only natural variability, not human-induced climate change.

Although society could offset the climate impacts by planting wheat and corn in cooler regions, such planting shifts to date have not occurred quickly enough to offset warmer temperatures, the study warned. The authors also found little evidence that other adaptation strategies, such as changes in crop varieties or growing practices, would totally offset the impact of warming temperatures.

“Although further study may prove otherwise we do not anticipate adaptation being fast enough to significantly alter the near-term risks estimated in this paper,” they wrote.

“We can’t predict whether a major slowdown in crop growth will actually happen, and the odds are still fairly low,” said Tebaldi. “But climate change has increased the odds to the point that organizations concerned with food security or global stability need to be aware of this risk.”

The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily