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Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexico to become top year round supplier

Greenhouse vegetables
Mexico to become top year round supplier

Mexico is well on its way to becoming the number one, year round supplier of greenhouse vegetables for the North American market. The technical, capabilities and ambitions of the Mexican growers are increasingly important. Nowadays it is hard to find a difference between a Mexican tomato versus a U.S. or Canadian grown piece of fruit. If it is up to Fried de Schouwer of GPC, Mexico will become the most important supplier on a year round basis for North America. “Our growers have become fully dedicated to delivering high quality produce, year round.”

Almost 10 years ago, Fried de Schouwer was one of the founders of Greenhouse Produce Company LLC (GPC); a joint effort by Mexican growers that was created in order to achieve a stronger sales organization and create better access to the market. By combining their unique strengths and neutralizing each others’ weaknesses, GPC is a more successful grower coalition which can better respond to US retailer’s demands.

“Thanks to the cooperation between smaller and larger growers, we are able to streamline the marketing of smaller Mexican growers”, Fried tells us when explaining the activities of GPC. “We work as a collective group; from selecting the right varieties to packing and shipping, all of our growers work closely together and benefit from each others excellence and expertise.”


Central packing warehouse

As an example, Fried tells us about the packing and shipping from the smaller growers. “We have growers that only produce a few pallets a day, but thanks to our logistical network, one truck can pick up several pallets from smaller growers and consolidate them at our central packing and coldstore facility in Celaya. This enables us to improve the quality of the pack.”

200 hectare

GPC currently has around 200 hectares divided over 25 growers. “We grow the full range of greenhouse vegetables in  both high tech and medium tech greenhouses; tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers. Around 15 percent of our current export is certified organic.”

According to Fried, the medium tech growers are able to grow a very good quality crop within a shorter season. “They are mostly located in a moderate micro climate where they simply do not need any high tech requirements such as glass greenhouses or full time heating. They are dedicated to certain production periods; for example 3 months of harvest in the spring and 3 months of harvest in advance of the colder winter period. In these seasons they are very successful. In the periods when it is too hot or too cold, the high tech growers are filling the gaps. That enables us to supply a consistent quality throughout the entire year.”


Top left: the team of GPC at the Expo AgroAlimentaria in Mexico last month. Bottom left and right side : At the show a large number of mid tech cultivations were on display. The quality of these crops was phenomenal.

Marketing niche: the medium to smaller retailer

GPC specializes in marketing  produce as a ’boutique’ like operator. “We try to add value through service by giving medium size growers market transparency and access to certain beneficial markets. We try not to compete with the larger produce marketing companies from Canada or the US and their affiliate seasonal Mexican growers. We are more committed to the Mexican growers wellbeing on a full-time basis.

The strategy that GPC applies has proven to be successful: everyday, 3-4 trucks collect small batches of produce at local growers, GPC packs and sorts the product at a central Mexican location prior to being shipped to a secondary quality control border warehouse either in Nogales, Arizona or McAllen, Texas, USA. All of the product gets a final packing, sorting and quality check before it is being shipped on to the final receiving customer.

Flexibility

The customers of GPC are all kinds of retailers; from national supermarkets, club stores, regional super markets to smaller super market chains with less than 50 stores. Regardless of the chainstore; the focus remains on consistency of quality produce.

According to Fried, the biggest advantage for retailers to buy from a small company like GPC is the personal touch. “We are a small player in the market who is able to add value through flexibility and personal attention. A retailer requires full attention from its suppliers, a personal touch combined with the necessary flexibility to facility the just in time delivery.  At GPC we are able to deliver the much needed flexibility by running the extra mile. In most cases, larger suppliers are not interested in fulfilling this need. Each supplier big or small needs to find its niche.”

For more information:
Greenhouse Produce Company
Fried de Schouwer (e-mail)
www.greenhouseproduce.net

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Moroccan cherry tomatoes year round to UK retail

Moroccan cherry tomatoes year round to UK retail

Family owned Delassus is one of the largest cherry tomato growers in Morocco. The company has been growing steadily for 15 years and has grown to an area of 400 hectares of greenhouse cultivation. British supermarkets are supplied from these greenhouses with various types of snack tomatoes all year round.

The Moroccan Delassus Group was founded over sixty years ago. They fully dedicated themselves to the production of cherry tomatoes fifteen years ago and were one of the first nurseries to do so. Annual production, of around 25,000 tons, is exported through their own company Duroc.

Consumption of cherry tomatoes is increasing, but the competition also is growing. How does Delassus keep in the game? “The Moroccan market primarily focuses on France, we focus on the British market,” said Fatiha Charrat of Delassus. When it comes to the British market, Spanish production is the most prominent.

The company is aware of the increasing competition on the market. Growers are switching from peppers to tomatoes. Delassus maintains its position with the focus on quality. “Years ago, we chose to grow using substrates to cultivate with a higher quality. With new varieties and product development, we keep our  focus on the quality. This is reflected in product innovation, the company is extending the assortment from six to ten segments.”

In addition to product innovation and quality, contact with the customer is also of great importance. Delassus has been supplying the four major UK retailers for years. “We communicate regularly about crop status, products and they also come and visit us,” said Charrat. The annual programs are pre-discussed – productions peak is in November and December and April and May, but year round the quality is consistent. “You might have more contact with store chains in regards to specialized products, but I think it is especially due to our good relationship with our buyers. We want them to know what is going on and vice versa. “ 

For more information:
Fatiha Charrat
Delassus Group
Tel: +212 665 186 868
Email: [email protected]
www.delassus.com
 
 
 

Publication date: 2/28/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Lipman introduces new round red tomato with increased flavor and color

Lipman, which lays claim to being North America’s largest open-field tomato grower, has unveiled its newest proprietary round-variety tomato, the Crimson Queen.

Lipman, based in Immokalee, FL, has long been dedicated to research and development to produce high-quality and flavorful produce. The Crimson Queen features increased flavor and a bright red interior and is the latest breed to emerge from the work of Mark Barineau, director of seed development and research and development for Lipman.

Lipman-2Grower Scott Rush manages the 5,000-acre farm in Immokalee, FL, that produces part of the company’s vegetable crop. (Photo by Chip Carter)The goal was to create a round field tomato that was not just durable, but also flavorful.

“We know that round tomatoes typically have a reputation for durability, rather than taste, and that increased flavor is normally associated with higher-sugar-content varieties like grape, cherry and heirloom-type tomatoes,” Barineau said. “However, with the Crimson Queen, we’re changing that by introducing a round tomato that doesn’t sacrifice flavor for function.”

The Crimson Queen has the same characteristics that make round varieties popular with foodservice operators and consumers: shape, durable skin and long shelf-life. But the tomato also has higher Brix levels and a focus on the flavor profile, as well as a corresponding boost in lycopene levels.

“Our growing process begins before the seeds are even planted with research,” said Chief Operating Officer Darren Micelle. “It’s because of our R&D team that we’re able to take feedback from our customers and develop a product that meets their needs.”

Barineau joined Lipman in 2004 and now generates some 100 million seedlings a year from the Immokalee facility.

“From the get-go it was very apparent to me that when you’re building something from scratch it’s a risk for everybody,” Barineau said. “There’s no blueprint for doing this, there’s no manual, there’s no cut-and-dried ‘do it this way or that way.’ I’ve got about another 15 years in this and I want to be the guy that’s known for making the most desirable tomato in the world. We want to make a true, genuine impact on society and I’d say everybody on my team would be in total agreement with that. We feel like we’re on a mission and our mission is to make the best tomatoes out there period and that goes right along with the mission statement of the company.”

With farms in Florida, South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, California and Mexico totaling tens of thousands of acres, Lipman grows, ships, processes and repacks fresh produce 365 days a year.

“The people who work for Lipman, it’s been my observation they tend to be very high-performing people,” Barineau said. “There’s camaraderie, there’s a team spirit within Lipman and a certain loyalty that the organization tends to foster. We believe in Lipman, we’re proud to see the literal fruits of our labors. We can ride through any field on the farm and say, ‘Hey, I remember when I made those pollinations or was evaluating that hybrid in 100 degree weather.’ We made this stuff — we’re proud of it, we like going to the grocery store and restaurant and seeing our work there.”

Attendees at PMA Fresh Summit in New Orleans can learn more about the new Crimson Queen variety at booth No. 2957.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Year round blueberry program to start with Chilean season

Year round blueberry program to start with Chilean season

Pandol Bros., Inc., a leading marketer of table grapes, will kick off their year around blueberry program out of Chile in November. “Pandol is excited to begin the blueberry program this coming Chilean season. We feel there is an opportunity to build a strong year around program,” says Greg Caveng, Blueberry Sales Manager for Pandol.

Caveng, an industry veteran, will manage the blueberry product line out of Pandol’s East Coast sales office. New blueberry growing areas are developing around the world and the berry category is one the most dynamic sectors in both retail and foodservice. “Greg has worked with blueberries for over 15 years. Greg will be one of the key drivers of our blueberry program,” says Scott Reade, Vice President Sales & Marketing for Pandol.

“We’re totally jazzed to deploy our logistics, foreign trade and marketing expertise in blueberries,” says John Pandol, Director of Special Projects.

For more information:
John Pandol, Director of Special Projects
Pandol Bros. Inc.
Tel: (661) 721-3945
Email: [email protected]
www.pandol.com

Publication date: 9/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Year round blueberry program to start with Chilean season

Year round blueberry program to start with Chilean season

Pandol Bros., Inc., a leading marketer of table grapes, will kick off their year around blueberry program out of Chile in November. “Pandol is excited to begin the blueberry program this coming Chilean season. We feel there is an opportunity to build a strong year around program,” says Greg Caveng, Blueberry Sales Manager for Pandol.

Caveng, an industry veteran, will manage the blueberry product line out of Pandol’s East Coast sales office. New blueberry growing areas are developing around the world and the berry category is one the most dynamic sectors in both retail and foodservice. “Greg has worked with blueberries for over 15 years. Greg will be one of the key drivers of our blueberry program,” says Scott Reade, Vice President Sales & Marketing for Pandol.

“We’re totally jazzed to deploy our logistics, foreign trade and marketing expertise in blueberries,” says John Pandol, Director of Special Projects.

For more information:
John Pandol, Director of Special Projects
Pandol Bros. Inc.
Tel: (661) 721-3945
Email: [email protected]
www.pandol.com

Publication date: 9/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

PeDe has year round grape importing programme

Remco de Boer: “Takeover of Banken Fruit and Vegetables was spot on”
PeDe has year round grape importing programme

From February 1st this year Remco de Boer – after a long career at Aldi and an interim period with an automotive wholesaler – has been in charge of fruit and vegetable importing and exporting company PeDe in Venlo. The switch to the fruit and vegetable sector has suited the manager. “We are in a competitive market, in which we have to work hard, and the margins are low, but that makes it tiring.”


Grapes are key product
The Best Fresh Group subsidiary supplies an assortment of fruit and vegetables, but has a year round grape importing programme, which is rightfully a key product. “We supply a complete assortment of grapes in various colours, with and without seeds, from the production countries Namibia, South Africa, India, Egypt, Israel, Italy, Greece and Peru,” says Remco. “We focus on the European market with the grapes, our target group being retailers, exporters and so-called ‘one-stop-shopping’ customers. We select a specific assortment of grapes for every market, from extra large to medium, with a packaging in tune with the customer.”

“We are lucky to have such efficient buying, due to a close collaboration with growers in the region, our own import from European and overseas countries, as well as the purchasing done by subsidiaries within the Best Fresh Group. We have regular product specialists for the product specific demands. The customers have the opportunity to have the entire fruit and vegetable assortment ordered and delivered by one company all year round. Not just fruit and vegetables from Holland, but also import from Southern Europe and exotics and tropical products from overseas production countries,” says Remco.

Germany
The target group that needs this type of service, and which PeDe BV has been supplying to for 72 years, consists of traders at markets, catering suppliers, vegetable processing companies, exporters and suppliers for supermarkets located in German speaking and Scandinavian countries, Poland and the Czech Republic. “Germany is worth 65% of our turnover. The name PeDe has become established over of the years, but our year round grape programme has been underexposed, even in Germany. This is why we have this video made, to show our added value.”

With the accession of sales and pilot team of Banken Fruit and Vegetables to PeDe on January 1, the company is able to grow even further in the countries mentioned above, Belgium and Southern European countries. “Banken had around the same assortment as us, but mainly had customers in the North of Germany, whereas we had those in South. The takeover has been spot on. We complement each other and have managed to extend our clientele by offering slightly different products.”


For more information:
Remco de Boer
PeDe B.V.
Venrayseweg 122D
5928 RH Venlo
T: +31 77 3230235
F: +31 77 3230299
[email protected]
www.pede.nl

Publication date: 9/18/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Judge in Horse Slaughter Case Corrects Mistake; No Next Round Date Set

Federal District Court Judge M. Christina Armijo has amended her order temporarily banning horsemeat packing in the U.S. because it was too broadly drawn. Armijo’s original Aug. 2 temporary restraining order said USDA was ordered to suspend or withhold the provision of “meat inspection services” to Valley Meat and Responsible Transportation until further order of the court.

Armijo officially amended the temporary restraining order Wednesday to order USDA “to suspend or withhold the provision of horse meat inspection services to Valley Meat and Responsible Transportation until further order of the Court.” And although the judge’s Aug. 2 order promised a hearing on the plaintiff’s motion for a temporary injunction, it has not yet been scheduled. There has been a blizzard of filings over the request to change the temporary restraining order and the injunction bond.

Bruce A. Wagman, the San Francisco attorney representing the Humane Society of the United States along with horse rescue and animal welfare groups, wants Armijo to waive under the “public interest exception” the nearly $ 500,000 per month bond plaintiffs would have to pay to see the case move forward.

“There is no dispute that Magistrate Judge Scott entered a massive injunction bond in this case – perhaps the largest ever in a public interest NEPA case,” Wagman wrote. “Defendants were able to secure this crippling bond by exploiting an oversight in the Court’s order – which not only enjoined the only party sued and the only party accused of violating federal law, but also the private non-federal company interveners.”

Plaintiffs in the case also argued that since Iowa’s Responsible Transportation has withdrawn its equine application for the cattle business and New Mexico’s Valley Meat is having state water permit issues and isn’t approved for shipment to the European Union, there is no real need for the bond coverage. (The EU is a large consumer of horse meat for human consumption.)

In the blizzard of paper now before the court, however, perhaps the most dramatic is the declaration from Ricardo De Los Santos, general manager of Valley Meat in Roswell, NM.

“Valley is a small locally operated Hispanic business that lacks the resources to protect itself from the economic harm sought to be done to it by the large multi-million activists groups that are seeking to enjoin USDA from facilitating Valley’s lawful agribusiness operation,” he states.

De Los Santos says Valley has spent $ 150,000 retrofitting its plant for equine operations and is now out almost $ 22,000 per day in gross revenue for each day the court prevents it from processing horse meat.

“The actions of Plaintiffs have trapped Valley with no alternative but to devote its extremely diminished and dwindling resources toward litigation and the bare minimum needed to keep the plant in a ready state should the hurdles imposed by Plaintiffs and this Court be removed,” his declaration states.

The Yakama and Navajo Indian nations are intervenors on the side of the defendants in the cases in part because of their concern about the damage being done to tribal and public lands by the swelling populations of wild horses.

Principal defendants in the case are Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Under Secretary for Food Safety Elizabeth A. Hagen and Food Safety and Inspection Service Administrator Alfred Almanza.

Food Safety News