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Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

About halfway through the window during which Mexican growers export mangos to the US, the rate at which mangos have arrived in the US is ahead of last year’s pace.

The National Mango Board projects that total shipments of Mexican mangos into the US will reach 42.1 million boxes this season. Shipments for the season reached 35.6 million boxes during the week ending on June 15, and that’s about three million more boxes than were shipped at the same time last year. Last season’s shipments from Mexico were at 35.7 million boxes for mid-June last year. The week ending June 15, 2013 saw Mexican growers ship 3.3 million boxes of mangos into the US, which means this is when shippers approach peak volumes for the season.

The most popular varieties this season have been the Tommy Atkins and Ataulfo, with those two varieties representing almost 70 percent of the mangos coming into the US from Mexico.

Publication date: 6/28/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean grape shipments under way

Harvesting in Chile’s Copiapó Valley has begun, and the first grapes of the Chilean season are on their way to the North American market. With favorable climatic conditions throughout the past year, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association anticipates that export volumes from Copiapó will grow from 10 million boxes to more than 11 million boxes. North America is the largest export market, receiving roughly 70 percent of all Copiapó grapes.

The main early varieties are Perlette, Thompson, Flame and Superior, but the Copiapó growers, along with the rest of the Chilean grape industry, are working diligently to introduce new varieties. In Copiapó, such new varieties include Prime, Allison, Arra 15, Timco and Ralli.

“I recently spoke on North America market trends at a seminar hosted by the Producer and Exporters Association of Copiapó,” Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “Growers clearly have a strong focus on North America, and a commitment to meeting the market’s needs. With positive reports on this year’s crop, we’re looking forward to a strong start to the season.”

The CFFA supports grape promotions throughout the season and has recently hired a new merchandiser in eastern Canada to further expand the marketing of fresh fruit from Chile.

Chilean grapes represent over 40 percent of total Chilean fresh fruit export volumes to the United States. Over 300,000 tons were shipped to the United States last year.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Avocado market strengthens as Mexican shipments wane and California fruit sizes

The California avocado deal has been hampered by a plethora of small-sized fruit, with Mexican producers providing most of the larger fruit for the past couple of months. But the avocado market is on an uptick as Mexico moves into a typical lag period and California fruit begins to have a more diverse size portfolio.

Rob Wedin, vice president of fresh sales for Calavo Growers Inc. in Santa Paula, CA, told The Produce News that “Mexico is barely importing any small fruit at all, while packers in California are getting better sizing every day.”

The result, he said, is a strengthening in the market. He said Mexico’s fruit, which has largely ranged from 32-48s, was down in volume the last week in June and should be down for most of July. It will be August, he predicted, before Mexico gets into big volume shipments again as its new crop begins.

At the same time, California is expected to have good size and good volume well into October.

At the beginning of the season, the California crop was estimated at about 515 million pounds, which is a big-volume crop. The smaller fruit during the first third of the season has reduced the estimate a bit, but most observers still expect it to be very close to the 500 million-pound figure.

Illustrating the size issue was Mark Carroll, senior director of purchasing and merchandising for produce and floral for Gelson’s Markets, which is a Southern California chain of 16 upscale stores.

Gelson’s typically supports the California avocado growers when their crop is in season, but this year it was mid-June before he was able to find enough large fruit for his conventional displays.

He said he was able to switch to organic avocados from California early in the season because he uses a 48 size in his organic displays. But he just wasn’t able to find enough of the 40 size and larger fruit for his conventional displays until mid-June.

Wedin said that most of the larger California Hass avocados that have been available are “Lamb Hass,” which is a slightly different variety though it does have the “Hass” designation and as the season wears on it is hardly distinguishable from the regular Hass. It does have a slightly smoother skin, especially early in the season.

Bob Lucy, who is a partner and handles sales at Del Rey Avocado Co. in Fallbrook, CA, cautioned that while the fruit is getting larger, it may be several weeks before there are consistent supplies across all sizes.

Lucy said many growers have been size picking for two months, literally taking any fruit with any size at all off the trees. So even though the fruit is now sizing at a much faster clip, he said it is going to take several weeks to completely fill the pipeline of all sizes.

So during the last week of June, the shipment of smaller fruit (60-72) from California actually increased as a percentage of total volume while larger fruit (40 and 48) declined, according to Lucy

Of course this was also caused by a several-dollar jump in the market place, which saw a strong demand for many sizes.

By the last week of June, the U.S. Market News Service reported that larger fruit from California was selling in the $ 35 to $ 37 range, while the smaller fruit was in the $ 28 to $ 30 range. Some of the smaller fruit was being sold in bags for attractive retail pricing on multiples.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Washington apples to restart shipments to China

After more than two years without access to China for Washington Red and Golden Delicious apples, USDA’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service officially announced reinstatement of market access for apples from Washington state to China, effective immediately.

Shipments of Washington apples to China stopped in August of 2012, when the Chinese government refused to issue import permits to Chinese importers, citing concerns with a recently discovered fungus they claimed was not in China.

After two years of negotiations between the two governments, a recent site visit by Chinese Plant Quarantine officials — supported by APHIS, Northwest Fruit Exporters, Northwest Horticultural Council and industry members — was able to alleviate concerns of spreading the disease by mature, symptomless apples. The agreement calls for stepped-up control measures through improved horticultural, packing and sampling procedures in Washington.

China, although the world’s largest apple producer, is also a major market for Washington apples, and eclipsed 3 million 40-pound cartons during the 2010-11 marketing year, making it the industry’s fourth-largest export market that season.

“Clearly China has great potential for Washington apples, with an increasing middle class willing to purchase high-quality apples,” Todd Fryhover, president of the Washington Apple Commission, said in a press release. “This year, with our record crop, Chinese consumers will again have the opportunity to enjoy Washington apples, and our growers will have access to this important growth market.”

The Washington Apple Commission is the international marketing arm of the Washington apple industry and conducts promotions in over 25 global markets to drive consumer demand for apples from Washington state, which produces more than 90 percent of U.S. apple exports.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Washington apples to restart shipments to China

After more than two years without access to China for Washington Red and Golden Delicious apples, USDA’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service officially announced reinstatement of market access for apples from Washington state to China, effective immediately.

Shipments of Washington apples to China stopped in August of 2012, when the Chinese government refused to issue import permits to Chinese importers, citing concerns with a recently discovered fungus they claimed was not in China.

After two years of negotiations between the two governments, a recent site visit by Chinese Plant Quarantine officials — supported by APHIS, Northwest Fruit Exporters, Northwest Horticultural Council and industry members — was able to alleviate concerns of spreading the disease by mature, symptomless apples. The agreement calls for stepped-up control measures through improved horticultural, packing and sampling procedures in Washington.

China, although the world’s largest apple producer, is also a major market for Washington apples, and eclipsed 3 million 40-pound cartons during the 2010-11 marketing year, making it the industry’s fourth-largest export market that season.

“Clearly China has great potential for Washington apples, with an increasing middle class willing to purchase high-quality apples,” Todd Fryhover, president of the Washington Apple Commission, said in a press release. “This year, with our record crop, Chinese consumers will again have the opportunity to enjoy Washington apples, and our growers will have access to this important growth market.”

The Washington Apple Commission is the international marketing arm of the Washington apple industry and conducts promotions in over 25 global markets to drive consumer demand for apples from Washington state, which produces more than 90 percent of U.S. apple exports.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US: Airlines awash in international shipments of cherries

US: Airlines awash in international shipments of cherries

Cherries sure mean a lot of work at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, just like they do in the Yakima Valley. The number of international cargo flights — carrying everything from U.S. seafood to computer chips to customers around the globe — doubles each June and July.

“All because of cherries,” said Tom Green, senior manager for air cargo operations and development for Sea-Tac airport.

Our tender fruit, sometimes given away in Yakima Valley office lunchrooms and neighbourhood picnics, fetches up to $ 10 per pound from affluent Asian shoppers who consider it a luxurious delicacy and a perfect fit for their gift-giving culture.

To meet that sophisticated demand, airlines reroute their cargo planes to Sea-Tac’s ramps and haul the cherries in 100-ton loads to Korea, Singapore, Taiwan and — for the first time this year — Shanghai on what have been nicknamed “Cherry Charters.”

Near-perfect spring weather left growers expecting to harvest about 21.3 million 20-pound boxes of cherries, the third-highest haul ever.

Even with advances in cold storage, fresh Washington cherries must be flown to reach overseas customers before the fruit rots. The bulk reach export markets in the belly of passenger planes, right next to suitcases.

Airlines don’t reroute passenger flights just to pick up cherries when the supply spikes. They will, however, send more cargo planes.

This year, three new carriers have added Sea-Tac to their cargo plane stops for a total of 10. Some of those airlines make 10 flights a week. In total, cherries alone account for 21 extra cargo flights per week during the six to eight weeks of cherry harvest, up from 14 last year.

China Eastern Airlines joined the crowd this summer, for the first time flying cherries directly to mainland China.

The state-controlled airline ships to a handful of online retailers similar to Amazon that will deliver cherries directly to their shoppers’ doors for up to $ 10 per pound, said Keith Hu, director of export business development for the Washington State Fruit Commission, who helped set up some of the exchanges.

At those prices, it’s no wonder airlines are quick to route their cargo planes to Seattle for a load of cherries.

The cherries make it from tree to door in roughly 72 hours, often faster than they take to get to New York or Boston by truck. Cherries are never flown domestically.

Year-to-year, roughly one-third of Washington’s cherries, just like all the state’s fruit, are exported. And China is one of the fastest growing destinations.

Since 2005, China has gone from the 16th biggest international consumer to second, behind only Canada, where cherries are trucked, according to Washington Fruit Commission statistics. In 2012, one of the biggest years for cherries, Washington sent 1.14 million boxes to China for a value of $ 39.9 million.

China Eastern’s new direct flights give Yakima Valley growers and packers an extra “foot in the door,” said Howard Nager, vice president of marketing for Domex Superfresh Growers of Yakima, one of two state packers shipping on the new flights. The other is Yakima Fresh of Yakima.

Chinese customers, the ones who can afford to, often include fruit in gift baskets, Nager said. And they will pay top dollar.

“You’re talking about consumers who … are paying $ 85 for a melon,” he said.

Source: yakimaherald.com

Publication date: 7/23/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Israeli grape shipments to peak next week

Israeli grape shipments to peak next week

The Israeli grape harvest season started about a week ago and the first containers are already on the water. “The moderate weather allowed for a very good growing season; the crop has a nice appearance and it is in excellent shape,” assures Oron Ziv, one of the founders of the producing and exporting company BeFresh.

Production volumes are similar to last year’s, although the amounts distributed in the domestic and the overseas markets will vary compared to last season, as this highly depends on prices and market conditions. According to Ziv, the main export destinations will be Europe and Russia.

BeFresh normally enters the market with its Early Sweet white seedless grapes during the three week gap between the end of the Indian season and the start of the campaign in Egypt, where the predominant variety is the Superior Seedless (or Sugar One). “We believe that our grapes are currently the best option in terms of taste and appearance. Our first air shipments have also started and we expect shipment volumes to peak by the start of next week,” says Ziv.

The founder of BeFresh explains that it has been a tough season when it comes to prices for most products, so it is difficult to predict how grapes will do. “For the first air shipment we got a good price, as the market is pretty much empty, mostly due to the early finish of the Indian season. Next week we will see how we do, and even then, the big question mark is for how long it will last, as we have yet to see what volumes Egypt will ship.”

Ziv also mentions that last season was terrible for many operators, so many are being careful about where to ship. “In most cases last year, we could get better prices in the local market than in Europe, where the market was totally collapsed, and the situation was similar in Russia. We expect this campaign to be different, but we will be cautious and adopt a more conservative approach.”

BeFresh Grapes sales
Marnix van Fraassen
Direct Source International B.V 
Tel: +31 78 674 91 91
Email: [email protected]

For more information:
Oron Ziv
Email: [email protected]
www.BeFreshcorp.com

Publication date: 5/29/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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