Blog Archives

“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

Markus Fellman, Hellmann Perishable Logistics
“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

When it comes to global logistics trends, Markus Fellman, Global Vice President of Hellmann Perishable Logistics U.S.A., said that more and more exporters and importers are looking at integrated control, from farm to consumer.

At the recent Cool Logistics Conference in Rotterdam, Fellman explained, “this gives transparency and visibility; it allows for better control of equipment and carrier, uniform reports and prevents finger pointing from one logistics provider to another; it also helps reduce costs.”

One of the big trends in fruit shipping is a move from bulk to packaged produce. The main reason is “the flexibility; larger retail outlets like to specify the packaging unit very close to the point of sale. It also facilitates quality checks and rebranding, and as an integrated logistics provider, it gives the business another source of revenue,” says Markus.

Visibility tools have also brought great improvements. Markus explains that “it provides end to end cargo monitoring, real time tracking via GPS satellite, temperature monitoring, intrusion detection, control of G-force impact and air composition analysis. Depending on your needs, you can set different KPI’s.”

Lastly, it is worth noting how the South America-North Europe trade is changing, with the former becoming more import-driven due to a growing middle class that is boosting large retailer sales. “Additionally, the rise of e-commerce in China will diversify the industry’s players and decision-makers and will significantly change our business model.”

Publication date: 10/17/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

Markus Fellman, Hellmann Perishable Logistics
“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

When it comes to global logistics trends, Markus Fellman, Global Vice President of Hellmann Perishable Logistics U.S.A., said that more and more exporters and importers are looking at integrated control, from farm to consumer.

At the recent Cool Logistics Conference in Rotterdam, Fellman explained, “this gives transparency and visibility; it allows for better control of equipment and carrier, uniform reports and prevents finger pointing from one logistics provider to another; it also helps reduce costs.”

One of the big trends in fruit shipping is a move from bulk to packaged produce. The main reason is “the flexibility; larger retail outlets like to specify the packaging unit very close to the point of sale. It also facilitates quality checks and rebranding, and as an integrated logistics provider, it gives the business another source of revenue,” says Markus.

Visibility tools have also brought great improvements. Markus explains that “it provides end to end cargo monitoring, real time tracking via GPS satellite, temperature monitoring, intrusion detection, control of G-force impact and air composition analysis. Depending on your needs, you can set different KPI’s.”

Lastly, it is worth noting how the South America-North Europe trade is changing, with the former becoming more import-driven due to a growing middle class that is boosting large retailer sales. “Additionally, the rise of e-commerce in China will diversify the industry’s players and decision-makers and will significantly change our business model.”

Publication date: 10/17/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

Markus Fellman, Hellmann Perishable Logistics
“Fruit shipping moving from bulk to packaging”

When it comes to global logistics trends, Markus Fellman, Global Vice President of Hellmann Perishable Logistics U.S.A., said that more and more exporters and importers are looking at integrated control, from farm to consumer.

At the recent Cool Logistics Conference in Rotterdam, Fellman explained, “this gives transparency and visibility; it allows for better control of equipment and carrier, uniform reports and prevents finger pointing from one logistics provider to another; it also helps reduce costs.”

One of the big trends in fruit shipping is a move from bulk to packaged produce. The main reason is “the flexibility; larger retail outlets like to specify the packaging unit very close to the point of sale. It also facilitates quality checks and rebranding, and as an integrated logistics provider, it gives the business another source of revenue,” says Markus.

Visibility tools have also brought great improvements. Markus explains that “it provides end to end cargo monitoring, real time tracking via GPS satellite, temperature monitoring, intrusion detection, control of G-force impact and air composition analysis. Depending on your needs, you can set different KPI’s.”

Lastly, it is worth noting how the South America-North Europe trade is changing, with the former becoming more import-driven due to a growing middle class that is boosting large retailer sales. “Additionally, the rise of e-commerce in China will diversify the industry’s players and decision-makers and will significantly change our business model.”

Publication date: 10/17/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Industry to discuss North and Latin American ports, shipping and logistics

TOC Americas conference and exhibition
Industry to discuss North and Latin American ports, shipping and logistics

Senior executives from North and Latin America’s container port, shipping and logistics sectors will unite in Cartagena, Colombia next week for the 14th annual TOC Americas conference and exhibition.

With the advent of Panama Canal expansion, changes to regional economies and trade flows, growing vessel sizes and a raft of new infrastructure developments, the state of shipping and logistics across the Americas is changing rapidly. All this will be reflected in a busy 3-day conference programme, with sessions covering international trade trends, container shipping forecasts, port development, terminal operations, equipment and technology, hinterland issues, and cold chain logistics.

Delegates will be able to learn how container ports can improve productivity without disrupting day to day operations, attendees will find out why shippers make ocean freight procurement decisions, analyse regional shipping networks after the Panama Canal expansion, prepare for the container and reefer shipping trends impacting supply chains, and discover best practices for transporting perishable cargo.

Major shipping lines in attendance
TOC Americas is a magnet for shipping line executives with an operational, network design, and port and terminal focus. This year’s conference promises to be no exception, with participation from key figures including Robbert van Trooijen, CEO, Latin America and Caribbean, Maersk Line; Howard Finkel, Executive Vice, President Trade Division, COSCO Container Lines Americas, Poul Hestbaek, SVP Latin America West Coast & Caribbean, Hamburg Süd; Boris Leyton, VP Operations & Logistics WCSA, CSAV; and Karlien Brolsma, General Manager Procurement, Maersk Line Central America.

Terminal productivity

Terminal productivity is under the spotlight as larger container vessels are deployed on all markets and trades. Shippers and carriers are looking to terminals for faster, more reliable turnaround times in order to ensure supply chain integrity. On Day Two of TOC Americas 2014, a panel of experts will discuss how the growing stresses of ship size vs. port capabilities can be reconciled in the debate Latin American Terminal Productivity & the Supply Chain Impact. Delegates will be able to hear from speakers representing Maersk Line, CSAV, Moffatt & Nichol, AECOM, SSA Marine, SPRC, and Virginia International Terminals.

Port technology exhibition
TOC Americas includes the region’s biggest dedicated container port equipment and technology exhibition. Visitors will be able to view the latest advances in container handling technology and automated solutions for the berth, in the yard and at the gate. Click here to see the latest floor plan.

Networking focus
As usual, the region’s premier container shipping conference and port technology expo will bring together industry leaders representing port authorities, terminal operators, shipping lines, freight forwarders and cargo owners.

Alongside the formal conference sessions and exhibition, TOC Americas also offers a social environment in which to network and meet new and old business contacts. The night before the trade show begins, ice-breaker welcome drinks will be held in a casual setting at the official event hotel (Monday, October 13).

After the first day of the event closes, a networking reception will be held on the quayside at event host Port of Cartagena’s Manga container terminal, with drinks, canapés and live entertainment (Tuesday, October 14).

Day 2 of TOC Americas will end with ‘Happy Hour’ drinks on the trade show floor at 16:15hrs (Wednesday, October 15), which is free for all delegates and exhibitors to attend.

Please visit tocevents-americas.com for more information.

Publication date: 10/10/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Simonian Fruit Co.’s pomegranates begin shipping Sept. 1

With fresh pomegranates expected to harvest about seven to 10 days earlier than normal this year, Simonian Fruit Co. plans to ship early-season varieties starting Sept. 1. Shipping under the “SIMCO” brand, Simonian is one of the more experienced pomegranate grower-shippers in the industry, with more than 35 years of handling the autumn fruit.

The first variety to ship will be the Urbanekgranate, a proprietary variety to Simonian. Other early season varieties include Smith and Early Wonderful. These will be followed by the most popular variety, Wonderfuls, later in the season.

“Overall, the quality looks to be good this season,” Jeff Simonian, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “The size of this year’s crop is expected to be normal to slightly smaller than last season. We are expecting another season of good color and flavor as well.”

Simonian added that the company usually ships at least through the first of January, and during some years even into February or March. “We are one of the few shippers that offers a five-month California pomegranate season,” he said

Worldwide export is a major part of the company’s pomegranate business, with about 40 percent of its total harvest in any given year going overseas. Simonian’s top international markets for pomegranates include Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Japan and Brazil.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Simonian Fruit Co.’s pomegranates begin shipping Sept. 1

With fresh pomegranates expected to harvest about seven to 10 days earlier than normal this year, Simonian Fruit Co. plans to ship early-season varieties starting Sept. 1. Shipping under the “SIMCO” brand, Simonian is one of the more experienced pomegranate grower-shippers in the industry, with more than 35 years of handling the autumn fruit.

The first variety to ship will be the Urbanekgranate, a proprietary variety to Simonian. Other early season varieties include Smith and Early Wonderful. These will be followed by the most popular variety, Wonderfuls, later in the season.

“Overall, the quality looks to be good this season,” Jeff Simonian, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “The size of this year’s crop is expected to be normal to slightly smaller than last season. We are expecting another season of good color and flavor as well.”

Simonian added that the company usually ships at least through the first of January, and during some years even into February or March. “We are one of the few shippers that offers a five-month California pomegranate season,” he said

Worldwide export is a major part of the company’s pomegranate business, with about 40 percent of its total harvest in any given year going overseas. Simonian’s top international markets for pomegranates include Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Japan and Brazil.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Simonian Fruit Co.’s pomegranates begin shipping Sept. 1

With fresh pomegranates expected to harvest about seven to 10 days earlier than normal this year, Simonian Fruit Co. plans to ship early-season varieties starting Sept. 1. Shipping under the “SIMCO” brand, Simonian is one of the more experienced pomegranate grower-shippers in the industry, with more than 35 years of handling the autumn fruit.

The first variety to ship will be the Urbanekgranate, a proprietary variety to Simonian. Other early season varieties include Smith and Early Wonderful. These will be followed by the most popular variety, Wonderfuls, later in the season.

“Overall, the quality looks to be good this season,” Jeff Simonian, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “The size of this year’s crop is expected to be normal to slightly smaller than last season. We are expecting another season of good color and flavor as well.”

Simonian added that the company usually ships at least through the first of January, and during some years even into February or March. “We are one of the few shippers that offers a five-month California pomegranate season,” he said

Worldwide export is a major part of the company’s pomegranate business, with about 40 percent of its total harvest in any given year going overseas. Simonian’s top international markets for pomegranates include Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Japan and Brazil.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Simonian Fruit Co.’s pomegranates begin shipping Sept. 1

With fresh pomegranates expected to harvest about seven to 10 days earlier than normal this year, Simonian Fruit Co. plans to ship early-season varieties starting Sept. 1. Shipping under the “SIMCO” brand, Simonian is one of the more experienced pomegranate grower-shippers in the industry, with more than 35 years of handling the autumn fruit.

The first variety to ship will be the Urbanekgranate, a proprietary variety to Simonian. Other early season varieties include Smith and Early Wonderful. These will be followed by the most popular variety, Wonderfuls, later in the season.

“Overall, the quality looks to be good this season,” Jeff Simonian, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “The size of this year’s crop is expected to be normal to slightly smaller than last season. We are expecting another season of good color and flavor as well.”

Simonian added that the company usually ships at least through the first of January, and during some years even into February or March. “We are one of the few shippers that offers a five-month California pomegranate season,” he said

Worldwide export is a major part of the company’s pomegranate business, with about 40 percent of its total harvest in any given year going overseas. Simonian’s top international markets for pomegranates include Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Japan and Brazil.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Russia’s food ban blessing in disguise for some shipping companies

Russia’s food ban blessing in disguise for some shipping companies

Team Niinivirta, a Finnish family-run transportation firm, turned 60 this year, but its third-generation managers now don’t know if the business will see Christmas, because of Russia’s new ban on European food imports. The firm based in Kotka, on the Gulf of Finland opposite St. Petersburg, was using its 12 refrigerated trucks to ship 80 loads a month of Finnish milk products to Russia.

Meanwhile bigger more diverse logistics companies are expected to be able to adapt as substitute imports start to come from further afield, from countries unaffected by the ban.

For the European transport and logistics sector, which generates 900 billion Euro ($ 1,200 billion) in annual revenue and employs over 7 million people, according to the Alliance for European Logistics, the food import ban hits the business of those companies already grappling with tight margins and overcapacity due to volatile freight costs and ailing European economies.

However, at the same time shipping companies like A.P. Moller-Maersk stand to benefit as Russia looks further afield to places like Brazil to help restock its larder.

EU farm exports to Russia are worth about 11 billion Euro a year, roughly 10 percent of all EU agricultural sales.

“We have a big shipping route from Latin America directly into Saint Petersburg in Russia. There will be an upswing in [volumes on] long haul routes,” Maersk’s chief executive Nils Andersen said Tuesday. When there is less trade between Europe and Russia, more traffic turns up on the Asian side [of Russia], where we also have port activities at Vostochny.”

Other companies that operate “reefers” — specialized refrigerated cargo ships that carry perishable goods — include Switzerland’s Kuehne & Nagel, Germany’s Hapag-Lloyd and Singapore’s Neptune Orient Lines.

“That is a specialized market, and the demand/supply balance is probably more tight than in other shipping areas,” said Lars Heindorff, an analyst with ABG Sundal Collier, noting that the refrigerated containers are more costly because the long distances and refrigeration require more energy.

Unlike local specialists like Team Niinivirta, many other companies in the sector, including Deutsche Post’s DHL and France’s Norbert Dentressangle, operate a range of businesses from trucking to freight forwarding to logistics, so may be able to make up for any lost trucking business with a boost to shipping or logistics.

“If new logistics solutions need to be found … the logistics firms will benefit because it is their business to organize that,” said Vontobel analyst Michael Foeth.

DHL and Kuehne & Nagel said they were monitoring the situation closely. Norbert Dentressangle and Britain’s Stobart Group did not respond to requests for comment.

While Danish freight forwarding company DSV said it does not foresee a direct impact from the Russian ban on its business, it said the transport sector was seeing changes.

“There’s a lot of transport equipment which is usually occupied transporting to and from Russia which is currently coming back to the European market,” Director of DSV Investor Relations Flemming Ole Nielsen said. “We can see an impact in overcapacity or at least more capacity being available,” he said.

The manager of another Finnish trucking firm said idle trucks have already pushed down prices.

“Some offers seem very low, so low that I cannot fathom how they could be profitable,” the manager said, declining to be identified by name.

The impact of the import ban is also being felt by non-food haulers travelling to Russia as drivers already nervous about driving there are now expecting more stringent customs checks including roadside stoppages, according to one UK-based transportation company.

“Some drivers are preferring not to work in Russia,” said Luke Devlin, director of PDQ Specialist Couriers, which transports urgent goods. Managers are meeting this week, he said, to discuss options such as sending drivers in pairs.

Source: themoscowtimes.com

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Russia’s food ban blessing in disguise for some shipping companies

Russia’s food ban blessing in disguise for some shipping companies

Team Niinivirta, a Finnish family-run transportation firm, turned 60 this year, but its third-generation managers now don’t know if the business will see Christmas, because of Russia’s new ban on European food imports. The firm based in Kotka, on the Gulf of Finland opposite St. Petersburg, was using its 12 refrigerated trucks to ship 80 loads a month of Finnish milk products to Russia.

Meanwhile bigger more diverse logistics companies are expected to be able to adapt as substitute imports start to come from further afield, from countries unaffected by the ban.

For the European transport and logistics sector, which generates 900 billion Euro ($ 1,200 billion) in annual revenue and employs over 7 million people, according to the Alliance for European Logistics, the food import ban hits the business of those companies already grappling with tight margins and overcapacity due to volatile freight costs and ailing European economies.

However, at the same time shipping companies like A.P. Moller-Maersk stand to benefit as Russia looks further afield to places like Brazil to help restock its larder.

EU farm exports to Russia are worth about 11 billion Euro a year, roughly 10 percent of all EU agricultural sales.

“We have a big shipping route from Latin America directly into Saint Petersburg in Russia. There will be an upswing in [volumes on] long haul routes,” Maersk’s chief executive Nils Andersen said Tuesday. When there is less trade between Europe and Russia, more traffic turns up on the Asian side [of Russia], where we also have port activities at Vostochny.”

Other companies that operate “reefers” — specialized refrigerated cargo ships that carry perishable goods — include Switzerland’s Kuehne & Nagel, Germany’s Hapag-Lloyd and Singapore’s Neptune Orient Lines.

“That is a specialized market, and the demand/supply balance is probably more tight than in other shipping areas,” said Lars Heindorff, an analyst with ABG Sundal Collier, noting that the refrigerated containers are more costly because the long distances and refrigeration require more energy.

Unlike local specialists like Team Niinivirta, many other companies in the sector, including Deutsche Post’s DHL and France’s Norbert Dentressangle, operate a range of businesses from trucking to freight forwarding to logistics, so may be able to make up for any lost trucking business with a boost to shipping or logistics.

“If new logistics solutions need to be found … the logistics firms will benefit because it is their business to organize that,” said Vontobel analyst Michael Foeth.

DHL and Kuehne & Nagel said they were monitoring the situation closely. Norbert Dentressangle and Britain’s Stobart Group did not respond to requests for comment.

While Danish freight forwarding company DSV said it does not foresee a direct impact from the Russian ban on its business, it said the transport sector was seeing changes.

“There’s a lot of transport equipment which is usually occupied transporting to and from Russia which is currently coming back to the European market,” Director of DSV Investor Relations Flemming Ole Nielsen said. “We can see an impact in overcapacity or at least more capacity being available,” he said.

The manager of another Finnish trucking firm said idle trucks have already pushed down prices.

“Some offers seem very low, so low that I cannot fathom how they could be profitable,” the manager said, declining to be identified by name.

The impact of the import ban is also being felt by non-food haulers travelling to Russia as drivers already nervous about driving there are now expecting more stringent customs checks including roadside stoppages, according to one UK-based transportation company.

“Some drivers are preferring not to work in Russia,” said Luke Devlin, director of PDQ Specialist Couriers, which transports urgent goods. Managers are meeting this week, he said, to discuss options such as sending drivers in pairs.

Source: themoscowtimes.com

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com