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Carolinas receive nearly $2 million in specialty crop grants

North and South Carolina farmers trying to combat pests and diseases attacking their blueberries, sweet potatoes and other specialty crops are getting help from the federal government. The U.S. Agriculture Department has provided nearly $ 2 million for a total of 35 programs in the Tar Heel and Palmetto states to research or promote home-grown fruits, vegetables and nursery plants.

The money will go to universities, local agencies and nonprofit organizations.SPECIALTY-GRANTS11213-SWEET-POTATOESGrowers of sweet potatoes, North Carolina’s number one produce crop, would benefit from a specialty crop grant project to eradicate the sweet potato weevil in North Carolina. It’s part of a $ 118 million national effort funded by the farm bill approved earlier this year. Its goal is to boost specialty crops, including fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, horticulture and nursery crops. North Carolina received $ 1.175 million for 15 projects; South Carolina received about $ 602,000 for 20 projects.

North Carolina projects include assistance to specialty crop growers through a partnership with the Carolinas Farm Stewardship Association to develop a food-safety support program and to establish community-based, sustainable food-safety systems. And in a second project with the Farm Stewardship group, offer specialty crop producers seeking to take advantage of the high-value market for organic produce by helping them transition to certified-organic production.

Other North Carolina projects include a partnership with North Carolina State University to identify, collect, virus-test and propagate old and new cultivars in order to provide growers with a reliable source of productive muscadine grape plants and to establish baselines for an integrated pest management program to eradicate the sweet potato weevil in North Carolina.

South Carolina projects include partnering with the South Carolina Fruit, Vegetable and Specialty Crop Association to increase the visibility of the state’s specialty crops by rebranding the association and refocusing its media presence. Also, in cooperation with Lowcountry Local First, to increase the number of consumers eating specialty crops and increase the number of specialty crop growers by promoting the Growing New Farmers program.

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the South Carolina Watermelon Association, will seek to increase the consumption of watermelon by providing education regarding its health benefits while promoting the South Carolina watermelon industry to retailers, wholesalers and the public through an extensive industry spokesperson program. Also, in cooperation with Clemson University, to develop a larger peach by using a wide and diverse set of germ plasm to accumulate many traits together into a single cultivar and distribute these findings to producers.

Also, in cooperation with the Coastal Conservation League, the South Carolina Department of Agriculture will try to create a stronger rural economy by increasing the volume of specialty crops distributed through local food hubs and managing the greater number of specialty crop farmers participating in the food hubs.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Carolinas receive nearly $2 million in specialty crop grants

North and South Carolina farmers trying to combat pests and diseases attacking their blueberries, sweet potatoes and other specialty crops are getting help from the federal government. The U.S. Agriculture Department has provided nearly $ 2 million for a total of 35 programs in the Tar Heel and Palmetto states to research or promote home-grown fruits, vegetables and nursery plants.

The money will go to universities, local agencies and nonprofit organizations.SPECIALTY-GRANTS11213-SWEET-POTATOESGrowers of sweet potatoes, North Carolina’s number one produce crop, would benefit from a specialty crop grant project to eradicate the sweet potato weevil in North Carolina. It’s part of a $ 118 million national effort funded by the farm bill approved earlier this year. Its goal is to boost specialty crops, including fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, horticulture and nursery crops. North Carolina received $ 1.175 million for 15 projects; South Carolina received about $ 602,000 for 20 projects.

North Carolina projects include assistance to specialty crop growers through a partnership with the Carolinas Farm Stewardship Association to develop a food-safety support program and to establish community-based, sustainable food-safety systems. And in a second project with the Farm Stewardship group, offer specialty crop producers seeking to take advantage of the high-value market for organic produce by helping them transition to certified-organic production.

Other North Carolina projects include a partnership with North Carolina State University to identify, collect, virus-test and propagate old and new cultivars in order to provide growers with a reliable source of productive muscadine grape plants and to establish baselines for an integrated pest management program to eradicate the sweet potato weevil in North Carolina.

South Carolina projects include partnering with the South Carolina Fruit, Vegetable and Specialty Crop Association to increase the visibility of the state’s specialty crops by rebranding the association and refocusing its media presence. Also, in cooperation with Lowcountry Local First, to increase the number of consumers eating specialty crops and increase the number of specialty crop growers by promoting the Growing New Farmers program.

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the South Carolina Watermelon Association, will seek to increase the consumption of watermelon by providing education regarding its health benefits while promoting the South Carolina watermelon industry to retailers, wholesalers and the public through an extensive industry spokesperson program. Also, in cooperation with Clemson University, to develop a larger peach by using a wide and diverse set of germ plasm to accumulate many traits together into a single cultivar and distribute these findings to producers.

Also, in cooperation with the Coastal Conservation League, the South Carolina Department of Agriculture will try to create a stronger rural economy by increasing the volume of specialty crops distributed through local food hubs and managing the greater number of specialty crop farmers participating in the food hubs.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

SN 2015 Prediction: In-store pharmacy beefs up specialty services

The pharmacy customer is a valuable one. That’s why supermarkets will do more to make them loyal to their stores. A key part of retail health and wellness offerings next year will be new pharmacy programs, products and services. One way retailers will differentiate themselves from the competition is by offering specialty pharmacy services. Specialty pharmacies help patients manage complex, chronic conditions by assigning a healthcare team to develop an individualized plan for the …

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Supermarket News

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Specialty crop grant earmarked by IEOOC for export market expansion

A $ 40,000 specialty crop grant from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture is being used by the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee’s export committee to seek additional outlets for Spanish Sweets in foreign markets.

IEOOC’s federal marketing order represents more than 300 growers and 36 shippers in the Treasure Valley area of Idaho-Eastern Oregon, and currently 22 shippers are exporting Spanish Sweets to foreign markets.exporttrademission2IEOOC Export Committee Vice Chair Joe Standage (right) meets with an importer/distributor during an early November trade mission to Brazil. (Photo courtesy of Idaho Department of Agriculture Markets Division) The export committee members are Joe Farmer, Fort Boise Produce, chairman; Logan Skeen, Skeen Farms, secretary/treasurer; Joe Standage, Standage Produce, vice chair; Tim Gluch, Golden West Produce; Bill Hartman, Hartman Farms; and Weston Schulties, Schulties Farms.

The grant was approved earlier in 2014, and IEOOC Executive Director Candi Fitch said it has expanded the export committee’s capacity for promotions in Mexico as well as for trade missions to Central America and South America over a two-year period.

“It has really increased our budget,” Fitch said in mid-November, shortly after a trade mission to Brazil had provided members of the committee insight into that South American country’s foodservice marketplace.

Standage told The Produce News the trip to Brazil, which was his inaugural trade mission, was eye-opening both to him and to the importers and distributors in that country.

“We went there primarily to inform buyers about our larger onions, the colossals and super colossals,” Standage said. “We hope to educate them at the foodservice level about our onions, and we were also seeing first-hand the volume of onions they go through. Brazil is a big consumer of onions, and they do grow them there in different growing regions much like we have in this country. What we want to impress upon them is that we are an outlet to fill gaps in their crop and also that we have something that no one else does: our big Spanish Sweets.”

Standage went on to say that Brazil’s middle class is increasing, which in turn will lead to an increase in restaurant dining and more demand for foodservice onions.

Fitch said another trade mission to Colombia is scheduled for February, and Standage will accompany members of the Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association on that trip.

As the committee continues making inroads into Latin markets — a yellow onion program is increasing awareness in Mexico’s retail markets for the Spanish Sweets — Canada remains the number one buyer of IEOOC exported product.

“We are always looking for new opportunities to build our export markets, and Canada is not only our largest but also a market that continues to grow,” Fitch said.

The committee has implemented a number of steps to reach out to offshore buyers, including shipper directories in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish and French Canadian. All of the directories are downloadable from usaonions.com.

“And we want buyers to know that while our focus has traditionally been on North America, Central America and South America, our export shippers send onions worldwide. We’re not limited to any area, and we ship to wherever phytosanitary regulations allow us to ship,” she said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.