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Early stonefruit season hampers South African imports

Early stonefruit season hampers South African imports

The early start to this year’s stonefruit harvest in South Africa made for a lighter crop and smaller sizes this year. But shippers expect volumes will pick up going into 2015.

Harvesting of stone fruit in South Africa got off to a very early start this year, with picking getting underway as much as 3 weeks earlier than normal. The quick start to the season resulted in smaller sizes, so growers had trouble filling out boxes. Apricots, in particular, were not as plentiful as expected, so early estimates as to how much fruit would be picked and shipped were not met.

Plums and peaches
Plum volumes were also off, with fruit sets not going well in some areas. As with apricots, smaller sizes made it harder to fill out boxes and meet early volume estimates. Peaches recovered from early deficiencies in the season and peak volumes are currently coming out of South Africa. Sizing on peaches has also been good.

Nectarines
Nectarines have also fared well in terms of sizes, but variability in maturity and sugar content made it a challenge to choose the right fruit for export early in the season. In general, the nectarine crop is looking very promising, according to one South African exporter.

Quality of stonefruit
Despite challenges with sizing and volumes, quality of fruit has been good. Good weather throughout the growing season resulted in high sugar levels in most fruit. Good sugar content helps fruit store well, so shelf life should be good. While the early part of the stone fruit season was characterized by a shortage of fruit, the last week has brought increased volumes, and exporters hope those volumes will continue going into January.

Prices
A early shortage of fruit resulted in higher prices, but those prices are starting to come down now that volumes are filling out. One exporter was concerned with how quickly prices rose earlier in the year because the subsequent drop might also come very quickly. Pricing trends have been similar to those from the 2011 season, but returns have been better because of a more favorable exchange rate. Prices in the United Kingdom, in particular, have been good when compared to the rest of Europe. Sales in Europe this time of year are usually pretty sluggish, but shippers expect demand to pick up in January.

Flat varieties
A stone fruit variety that has drawn a lot of interest in Europe has been the flat peach. While the uptick in attention to the variety has made South African exporters take note, South African growers cannot plant the variety commercially for at least another three years because of quarantine regulations. But if interest in flat stone fruit persists, growers will likely plant and export the fruit to Europe in the future.

Middle and Far East
Volumes of stone fruit in the Middle East and Far East have been very good this year, but prices there have been under pressure and are currently trending downward. While South African exporters don’t ship most of their fruit to those markets, those areas remain important, so exporters are watching those markets closely.

Publication date: 12/24/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Chile: Stonefruit exports fell 57% and cherry exports grew 32%

Fruit season ends
Chile: Stonefruit exports fell 57% and cherry exports grew 32%

As every year, September 1 marks the beginning of a new Chilean export season. Following is a review of the numbers of the species that have already closed their season and are getting ready for the next one.



Species 2012/13 
2013/14 %Var
Table grapes
852.519 728.314  -15%
Blueberries 86.949
74.380
 -14%
Cherries 51.948 68.537
  32%
Stone fruits 
211.203 90.815
 -57%

Table grapes: 

The 2013/14 Chilean table grape export season had a 15% decline in volume when compared to the previous season because of the frosts in September that affected the fruit in its most vulnerable state. Despite that decline, the highest peak in exports of the last 3 years, 75,033 tons, was reached in week 13. Another notable aspect of this season was the significant increase in Peruvian exports, which went from 148,500 to 222,894 tons, a 50% increase that exceeded the most positive expectations. 

Blueberries: 

Chilean blueberry exports this season dropped 14% when compared to the previous year and amounted to 74,380 tons. Blueberry production was affected by the frost in September, the Lobesia botrana and the port strike in summer. 

Cherries: 

Cherry exports increased by 32%, a figure that was lower than initial estimates. Expectations are that shipments will increase in the 2014/15 season if weather conditions are good. The big question, however, is: what will happen in the Chinese New Year? Next year, the Chinese New Year will take place on February 19, i.e. at week 8, 3 to 4 weeks later than in previous seasons, when Chile’s campaign is in its final phase. 

Stonefruits: 

The stonefruits had the biggest decline among the species analysed. Their season started before time and was 2 weeks shorter. Exports declined by 57% on average. Apricot exports were the most affected (-77 %) and peach exports the least (-44%). Nectarines exports decreased by 58%, while plums decreased by 60% or 69,800 tons. 

Source: iQonsulting

Publication date: 9/4/2014


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Italy: Solarelli stonefruit doing well in the Middle East

Ilenio Bastoni (Apofruit)
Italy: Solarelli stonefruit doing well in the Middle East

“After the positive test of 2013, this year we have increased the stores in the UAE that sell our Solarelli products,” explains Ilenio Bastoni from Apofruit Italia.


Promotions were carried out also throughout the Ramadan, which will end on 27th July: “in one single month, we shipped 150 pallets of stonefruit (peaches, nectarines, apricots and cherries), i.e. over 75 tons of fruit.”


“We have also increased our exports to Saudi Arabia. We currently reach these markets by air, but we are also considering shipping the medium-late varieties by sea.”


In a normal season, the 2-3 weeks needed for maritime transports should not be a problem even for perishable goods, but the bad weather this year affected shelf-life.”


“Internalisation is helping tackle the summer fruit crisis, but the fact that flight costs are high means less countries can afford them. The Middle East is a strategic market, which can guarantee interesting prices for high-quality produce, but we cannot put all our hope on that. Still, we will dedicate a lot of attention to it.”


Contacts:
Apofruit Italia

Viale della Cooperazione, 400
47522 Pievesestina di Cesena (FC)
Tel.: (+39) 0547 414822
Fax: (+39) 0547 414867
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.apofruit.it

Publication date: 7/22/2014


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US (CA): Strong pricing for stonefruit

The pull of a strong export market and lighter volumes have made for a strongstone fruit market in California.

“Prices are good,” said Jeff Simonian of Simonian Fruit Company, “and they’ve been steady for most of the season. They’ve been higher than the last two years, quite a bit higher than last year, and that’s considering that prices weren’t too bad two years ago.” He noted that prices for smaller sizes have been around the upper teens and for larger sizes around the mid-twenties. Lighter supplies, both in-state and from eastern states, have contributed to higher prices, as has the pull from the export market.

“I think it’s a combination of factors that has led to these prices,” said Simonian. “First, it’s supply and demand, and it could be that the drought has made some guys divert water to nut crops that are making more money. Also, early in the season there was frost in Georgia that wiped out some peaches, so that helped us.” This is also the first season that growers have had access to the Australian market, and that extra pull from exports has also contributed to higher prices.

“A lot of white varieties are exported heavily to Asian countries, and those exports seem to be increasing every year,” said Simonian. “The dollar is weak, so exports continue to be strong, and that’s made for a good season.”

For more information:

Jeff Simonian

Simonian Fruit Company

+1 559 834 5307

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Chilean stonefruit exports decreased 59% in 2013

Chilean stonefruit exports decreased 59% in 2013

As a result of the frosts in September, Chilean exports of nectarines, peaches, apricots and plums decreased by 59 % in 2013 over the previous year, said the sector’s entrepreneurs.

According to a statement from the Association of Exporters of Fruits Chile (ASOEX), before the frosts, the export volume of peaches had reached 33,000 tons and that of nectarines 63,000 tons, volumes that were similar to those recorded in the 2012-2013 season.

Plum shipments, which were expected to increase by 6%, led export volumes as they amounted to more than 44,000 tons, 62% less than in the previous year.

The report noted that while the shipments of stonefruits ended in week 24 in the previous season, this year they came to an end in week 18 because of the lower production volume.

Nectarines export volume reached 25,000 tons, 59% less than in the last season.

The peach was the fruit that was affected the least by the weather and its exports amounted to 18,000 tons, 45% less than in the previous year.

Apricot exports decreased by 75% and amounted to 311 tons.

31% of the Chilean plums were sent to the U.S. market, 25% to Latin America and 22% to the Far East.

The United States has gained prominence as a destination market for stonefruits while Europe, which ranked second last year, is now the country’s fourth major destination market.

The United States is still the main destination of nectarines with 44% of total exports, followed by Latin America and the Far East with 27% and 15%, respectively.

The U.S. absorbed 58% of the Chilean exports of peaches and Latin America 37%. 74% of the Chilean apricots were exported to the U.S., 22% to Latin America, and the remaining 4% to the rest of the markets.

Source: El Dínamo

Publication date: 5/29/2014


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Eren Tarim’s Turkish stonefruit season in full swing

Aysel Oguz: “We are always open to new markets”
Eren Tarim’s Turkish stonefruit season in full swing
Most Turkish exporters are specialised in citrus, but Eren Tarim wished to offer a wider range of fruit and vegetables. Deputy export manager Aysel Oguz said: “We believe it is important for a business to remain active throughout the year. Besides citrus, we also sell figs, stonefruit, melons, pomegranates, pears and various vegetables. At the moment we are in the middle of the stonefruit season, which is very important for our company. We supply cherries, apricots and peaches. “The flowering went well, even though a part of the production was affected by frosts and rain. But fortunately Turkey is a big country with many production areas, so we’ll reach our normal volumes.” The products are marketed under its own brand, EREN.


Aysel Oguz during Medfel 2014

Always open to new markets 

Eren Tarim exports to various countries in Europe, particularly Eastern Europe, and also sees great potential in Asia. “The mindset in Asian countries is very different than in Europe, but it is a great challenge to discover them and supply them. Currently, many stonefruit shipments are made to these countries by air. We are always open to new markets.” This year, Eren Tarim introduced a new marketing campaign with the motto ‘Will to Live’. The new slogan is part of the campaign which marks the 20-year anniversary of the company. “We find it very important to regularly come up with new themes and to promote them in our markets. The presentation of our company and our products is very important to us.”


Aysel is satisfied with the fair Medfel, in which the company took part from 13 to 15 May. “At this fair it is very easy to see who is coming to your stand and to arrange B2B meetings. It is very effective, and without wasting any precious time. Additionally, it is nice that the fair is so compact. It is an event that either not many people know about, or they are not interested in.”



For more information:
Aysel Oguz
Eren Tarim
SARIIBRAHIMLI  MAH.
KIZILYAKA MEVKII NO3/A AKDENIZ
Mersin – Turkey
T: +90 – 324 454 14 87-88
F: +90 – 324 454 14 89
[email protected]
www.erentarim.com

Publication date: 5/22/2014
Author: Gertrude Snoei
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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“Top production for Spanish stonefruit”

Erik-Jan Thur (Marni Fruit):
“Top production for Spanish stonefruit”

Good volumes of Spanish stonefruit are expected on the market. “Nothing has gone wrong in the production, such as frost. The production is good everywhere. There should be sufficient volumes coming this way. The expectation is that as we come into the summer season, we may come into a difficult position regarding sales,” says Erik-Jan Thur from Marni Fruit.


The trading company received the first peaches and nectarines from the southern regions like Murcia and Seville a few weeks ago. The switch to production areas like Lerida and Zaragoza will be made in mid June. “Everything is one or two weeks early. Egypt is also offering peaches, so there is enough on the market,” says Erik-Jan. “The quality of the stone fruit is good on arrival but due to the higher temperatures in Spain it has been ripening quickly. So it is essential not too wait too long to sell.”


“The prices are at a good level at the moment. The question is what affect the developments in Russia and the Ukraine will have on the market. The volume exported to those markets will have to find its way on the market and we will notice it here whether we want to or not,” continues the trader. “But the demand for summer fruit is good at the moment. The consumers are pretty much done with oranges and mandarins and want new products.”


According to the importer the stonefruit area has remained reasonably stable, although the area of paraguayos, platerina and apricots has grown again in the last year. “We have already received some Burlat cherries from the greenhouse, but they did not meet our colour and shelf life demands. We have received our first outside grown cherries this week and they are fine. We have started with the first Mauricia variety apricots and have also received the variety Mogador, which is more of a French variety with an orange look and red blush.”


The prices are at a reasonably good level. The supply of peaches is, however, increasing and the prices are under slight pressures. Prices are around 6/7 Euro for those packaged in 10×500 grammes and 14/15 Euro for 10x1kg. The price for loose peaches in a 3.5 kg packaging, depending on size, is between 8/9 Euro,” says Erik-Jan. “The price of apricots is also decreasing slightly, but retains a price level of 13-15 Euro for 5kg loose and prices of around 17/18 Euro for those packaged 10x1kg. These are the prices for good sizes, the smaller sizes are a few Euro lower on the market.”


For more information:
Erik-Jan Thur
Marni Fruit BV            
Gebroken Meeldijk 52        
2991 VD Barendrecht        
Tel: +31 (0)180 697 996        
Fax: +31 (0)180 697 990
[email protected]
www.marnifruit.nl

Publication date: 5/7/2014


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Australia welcomes US stonefruit

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

American stonefruit is expected to enter Australia in large volumes this winter with the Australian industry welcoming the imports.

Fresh produce marketing monitor Freshlogic predicts higher volumes than ever of new season US stonefruit entering the Australian market for 2014.

The prediction is based on the success of the product in its first year (2013) and indications from key importers.

But that’s good news according to John Moore, CEO, Summerfruit Australia, who said the industry welcomes US stonefruit into the marketplace.

“It induces more regular consumption of stonefruit into the Australian diet. It’s filling the void for that all-year-round fruit,” he said.

“Whilst we don’t want to see it impact too much on our early season fruit, the industry certainly welcomes US stonefrut.”

From an international trade perspective, he said if Australia expected to send fruit to the US then it was only logical their fruit be allowed in.

According to Freshlogic, increased imports of Northern Hemisphere fruit into Australia are being reflected in retail promotional activity over the winter and spring months, with clear implications for other staple fruits.

Martin Kneebone, managing director, Freshlogic said growth in the imported volumes of grapes, cherries, kiwifruit and more recently stonefruit has drawn these products into retailer promotional activity.

“Staple fruits such as apples and bananas, which have traditionally dominated fruit sales in the winter months, are now faced with a different competitive set,” he said.

Indications are that consumers have welcomed these products and the colour they bring to the winter fruit bowl, and the retailers are now meeting that demand.

The imported fruit is expected to become available to Australian importers in less than a month.

Freshlogic’s Adwatch service reported that a 26 per cent increase in grape retail promotion numbers over the August-October US import window between 2012 and 2013 illustrates the increased pressure.

“Increased competition will require a response from the staple fruits in order to maintain sales over the winter and spring period,” Mr Kneebone said.

Adwatch tracks more than 6500 retail promotions per week, covering all food and grocery categories.

Source: www.theland.com.au

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

American stonefruit is expected to enter Australia in large volumes this winter with the Australian industry welcoming the imports.

Fresh produce marketing monitor Freshlogic predicts higher volumes than ever of new season US stonefruit entering the Australian market for 2014.

The prediction is based on the success of the product in its first year (2013) and indications from key importers.

But that’s good news according to John Moore, CEO, Summerfruit Australia, who said the industry welcomes US stonefruit into the marketplace.

“It induces more regular consumption of stonefruit into the Australian diet. It’s filling the void for that all-year-round fruit,” he said.

“Whilst we don’t want to see it impact too much on our early season fruit, the industry certainly welcomes US stonefrut.”

From an international trade perspective, he said if Australia expected to send fruit to the US then it was only logical their fruit be allowed in.

According to Freshlogic, increased imports of Northern Hemisphere fruit into Australia are being reflected in retail promotional activity over the winter and spring months, with clear implications for other staple fruits.

Martin Kneebone, managing director, Freshlogic said growth in the imported volumes of grapes, cherries, kiwifruit and more recently stonefruit has drawn these products into retailer promotional activity.

“Staple fruits such as apples and bananas, which have traditionally dominated fruit sales in the winter months, are now faced with a different competitive set,” he said.

Indications are that consumers have welcomed these products and the colour they bring to the winter fruit bowl, and the retailers are now meeting that demand.

The imported fruit is expected to become available to Australian importers in less than a month.

Freshlogic’s Adwatch service reported that a 26 per cent increase in grape retail promotion numbers over the August-October US import window between 2012 and 2013 illustrates the increased pressure.

“Increased competition will require a response from the staple fruits in order to maintain sales over the winter and spring period,” Mr Kneebone said.

Adwatch tracks more than 6500 retail promotions per week, covering all food and grocery categories.

Source: www.theland.com.au

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

American stonefruit is expected to enter Australia in large volumes this winter with the Australian industry welcoming the imports.

Fresh produce marketing monitor Freshlogic predicts higher volumes than ever of new season US stonefruit entering the Australian market for 2014.

The prediction is based on the success of the product in its first year (2013) and indications from key importers.

But that’s good news according to John Moore, CEO, Summerfruit Australia, who said the industry welcomes US stonefruit into the marketplace.

“It induces more regular consumption of stonefruit into the Australian diet. It’s filling the void for that all-year-round fruit,” he said.

“Whilst we don’t want to see it impact too much on our early season fruit, the industry certainly welcomes US stonefrut.”

From an international trade perspective, he said if Australia expected to send fruit to the US then it was only logical their fruit be allowed in.

According to Freshlogic, increased imports of Northern Hemisphere fruit into Australia are being reflected in retail promotional activity over the winter and spring months, with clear implications for other staple fruits.

Martin Kneebone, managing director, Freshlogic said growth in the imported volumes of grapes, cherries, kiwifruit and more recently stonefruit has drawn these products into retailer promotional activity.

“Staple fruits such as apples and bananas, which have traditionally dominated fruit sales in the winter months, are now faced with a different competitive set,” he said.

Indications are that consumers have welcomed these products and the colour they bring to the winter fruit bowl, and the retailers are now meeting that demand.

The imported fruit is expected to become available to Australian importers in less than a month.

Freshlogic’s Adwatch service reported that a 26 per cent increase in grape retail promotion numbers over the August-October US import window between 2012 and 2013 illustrates the increased pressure.

“Increased competition will require a response from the staple fruits in order to maintain sales over the winter and spring period,” Mr Kneebone said.

Adwatch tracks more than 6500 retail promotions per week, covering all food and grocery categories.

Source: www.theland.com.au

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

Australia welcomes US stonefruit

American stonefruit is expected to enter Australia in large volumes this winter with the Australian industry welcoming the imports.

Fresh produce marketing monitor Freshlogic predicts higher volumes than ever of new season US stonefruit entering the Australian market for 2014.

The prediction is based on the success of the product in its first year (2013) and indications from key importers.

But that’s good news according to John Moore, CEO, Summerfruit Australia, who said the industry welcomes US stonefruit into the marketplace.

“It induces more regular consumption of stonefruit into the Australian diet. It’s filling the void for that all-year-round fruit,” he said.

“Whilst we don’t want to see it impact too much on our early season fruit, the industry certainly welcomes US stonefrut.”

From an international trade perspective, he said if Australia expected to send fruit to the US then it was only logical their fruit be allowed in.

According to Freshlogic, increased imports of Northern Hemisphere fruit into Australia are being reflected in retail promotional activity over the winter and spring months, with clear implications for other staple fruits.

Martin Kneebone, managing director, Freshlogic said growth in the imported volumes of grapes, cherries, kiwifruit and more recently stonefruit has drawn these products into retailer promotional activity.

“Staple fruits such as apples and bananas, which have traditionally dominated fruit sales in the winter months, are now faced with a different competitive set,” he said.

Indications are that consumers have welcomed these products and the colour they bring to the winter fruit bowl, and the retailers are now meeting that demand.

The imported fruit is expected to become available to Australian importers in less than a month.

Freshlogic’s Adwatch service reported that a 26 per cent increase in grape retail promotion numbers over the August-October US import window between 2012 and 2013 illustrates the increased pressure.

“Increased competition will require a response from the staple fruits in order to maintain sales over the winter and spring period,” Mr Kneebone said.

Adwatch tracks more than 6500 retail promotions per week, covering all food and grocery categories.

Source: www.theland.com.au

Publication date: 4/30/2014


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