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Florida 127 a sweet ‘Sensation’ in strawberry industry

Florida’s strawberry industry is abuzz as studies show strong potential for the Florida 127, a relatively new strawberry variety marketed under the “Sensation” brand.

“Florida 127 is a promising new cultivar for west-central Florida growers due to its early yield, robust plant habit, and excellent fruit size and eating quality,” according to the Institute of Food & Agricultural Services of the University of Florida.

According to the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, the IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center has patented nine Florida strawberry varieties since 1992.Florida12The Florida 127 strawberry is a relatively new variety marketed under the ‘Sensation’ brand. They are grown and marketed under the “Sweet Charlie,” “Rosa Linda,” “Earlibrite,” “Strawberry Festival,” “Carmine, “Winter Dawn, “Florida Elyana, “Florida Radiance” and “Winterstar” names. Although developed for optimum performance in Florida’s winter climate, the association said the varieties are marketed globally.

“We are so fortunate to have the University of Florida land grant university,” said Kenneth Parker, executive director of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association.

IFAS operations are spearheaded by Vance Whitaker, who Parker called “a tremendous asset to this industry.” He added that Whitaker’s predecessor, professor emeritus Craig Chandler, paved the way for the important research currently being conducted.

Florida 127, first crossed in 2009, reached marketplace introduction quickly. A limited volume was released in 2013.

“This is the second year it has been in commercial production,” Parker said. “We have to make sure it meets a high flavor profile.”

Another advantage of the Florida 127 is its ability to maintain high quality during and after shipment. “Consumers want sweeter berries with a longer shelf life,” he said.

Initial feedback about the strawberry variety has been positive. In addition to its sweet taste, Parker said the variety is large and the red color doesn’t darken over time. Whether eaten fresh or used for cooking applications, Parker said Florida 127 is a berry of choice.

Looking at production, Parker said limited acreage currently under cultivation for Florida 127 could bloom to as much as 2,500 acres next season. To illustrate the impact of the variety on the industry, Parker said Florida strawberry growers had approximately 11,000 acres in production for all varieties this season.

The commercialization process for new varieties gives Florida producers a competitive edge.

“Florida growers usually have a three-year competitive advantage [before the variety is generally released],” he said.

UF sells strawberry plants around the world, and Parker said the Middle East and Mexico are two top destinations for these patented plants.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US: Strawberry volumes to pick up in January

US: Strawberry volumes to pick up in January

Volumes of strawberries coming from Mexico are expected to increase at the start of next month, and berries from Florida are also expected to increase in volume during that time. California production will likely increase shortly after, making for robust volumes for the first month of 2015.

“Oxnard should kick into some good volume mid-January,” said Cindy Jewell, vice president of marketing for California Giant Berry Farms. “With all three districts in production, our sales group is looking forward to having promotable volume on strawberries in January.” To date, California production for the year has trailed slightly behind that from last year, with over 151 million flats picked as of December 17 of this year. Production in the state topped 155 million flats by the same date last year.

Florida has also trailed slightly behind last year’s pace, with production for that state at 1.2 million flats as of December 17. But volumes from Mexico are slightly ahead of imports from last year. While 3.9 million flats have been shipped here as of December 17, 3.7 million flats had been shipped by the same date last year.

As of December 18, 2014, the price for a flat of medium-to-large berries out of the Oxnard district was between $ 26.00 and $ 28.00. The price range for a flat at the Mexico crossing through Texas was slightly lower, with prices for a flat falling between $ 24.00 and $ 26.00. With supplies out of Central Florida still light, a flat from that region went for between $ 24.90 and $ 28.90.

For more information:

Cindy Jewell

California Giant Berry Farms

+1 831 728 1965

Publication date: 12/19/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Strawberry cultivation in Europe – current varieties and new selections

Italy: Strawberry cultivation in Europe – current varieties and new selections

A technical meeting was held on the importance of strawberry cultivation in Europe and on new interesting varieties for the domestic and European market on 18th June 2013 at the CReSo (Centro Ricerche per la Frutticoltura) located in Boves (Piedmont).


The event was organised by Cristiano Carli and Roberto Giordano, research managers from Creso. Roberto Giordano and Dr. Walther Faedi from Folrì’s CRA-FRF have talked about the strong and weak points of each of the varieties that are cultivated and available on the market.


Walther Faedi, national coordinator of the ‘Liste varietali dei Fruttiferi’ project, listed the main characteristics and tendencies in the main countries that produce strawberries i.e. Turkey, Spain, Poland, Germany, Italy, England, Holland and Netherlands.


Some of the data:

TURKEY Increase of cultivated surfaces but there are a few problems as regards distribution because of the difficulties in transportation. The production period is very long, from December to June.
SPAIN Decrease in surface areas but increase of production. Long production period, from December to June. Camarosa is the most popular variety even though Candonga is also gaining a following thanks to its organoleptic qualities.
POLAND The technique is being specialised and competitive producer cooperatives are being created. The production is mainly destined to the fresh market, leaving only a small part to the industry. Labour costs are really low: €2.5/h.
GERMANY Open field crops are the most popular. Expanded in the past few years, pressurising markets and lowering prices. Strong competitor for Italy. Elsanta and Clery are the main varieties. Remontat cultivars are increasing.
ITALY
In 2012, there were 3700 hectares of strawberry crops (-20% with respect to 2000), 40% of which in the North (Veneto, Emilia Romagna, Trentino and Piedmont). The Italian production can satisfy the demand coming from the domestic market the whole year round. Produce from Sicily and Calabria arrives on the markets from January to March, that from Campania and Basilicata from April/May and overlaps with that from the North (Verona and Emilia Romagna. Summer is covered by the mountain areas and Sicily covers late autumn.


Dr. Faedi then explained the new varieties in the different Italian regions: “In the South, a number of different varieties is being evaluated, such as for example Rania, Nabila, Pircinque and Kamila from Italy, Sabrina, Fuentepina, Antilla and Primoris from Spain and Splendor, Florida-Fortuna, Mojave and Benicia from America. In the North, Italian Cristina, Romina, Garda, Alina, Dely and Joly are being considered.”


Finally, DR. Faedi analysed some varieties more in detail, such as VR177.2, as the fruit represent a good compromise between weight, compactness, Brix level (sugar content), aroma and shelf-life.



Click here to enlarge the chart.

Dr. Roberto Lombardo also talked about the varieties and the selections currently being experimented at the CreSo. Primy (medium-early), Garda (medium-early), Joly (medium-late) and Laetitia (late) were the varieties included in the extensive experimentation under the 2013 Fragola Unifera programme.

Dr. Lombardo explained how, “Garda has a good productivity, the fruit is cuneiform, with a good weight, the flesh is compact and tastes good, it is important though to verify the colour. Primy has a good productivity, with a good weight; fruits are conical with a flat tip and the colour is deep red, which must be checked with high temperatures; the taste is balanced though the resistance of fruits to handling has to be analysed. Joly has an excellent sweet and aromatic taste, the colour is bright red, which turns to deep red with high temperatures, the flesh is quite compact, the productivity is average and it is easily detachable. Laetitia is conical, with good weight, it resists to handling, the colour is bright red and the taste is good and sweet.”

Once the presentation was over, it was possible to taste the different varieties of strawberries, both those registered and those experimented.

Publication date: 6/25/2013



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US (CA): Short strawberry market leads to higher prices

Supplies of strawberries out of California have been hampered by weather effects from earlier in the season. With less fruit, prices for berries have risen.

“Prices are currently reflective of a short market,” noted Cindy Jewell of California Giant Berry Farms. “Prices are higher than usual, which is good for the grower but probably not for the consumer.” By the end of last week, prices for a flat of berries were as high as $ 16.00 for some sizes. The short market is partly due to weather from earlier in the season and partly due to the transition to fall supplies.

“The season started earlier because of mild conditions,” explained Jewell. “We’re farther along with plants than usual. We also had some issues with labour during the middle of summer, so some guys pulled out of the fresh deal earlier than normal.” Barring heavy rain that cuts the season short, supplies are expected to go into November. As the season progresses, however, supplies will continue to diminish.

“You have days getting shorter, so volumes will diminish in California,” said Jewell. “There are still a lot of factors working against increases in volume.”

For more information:

Cindy Jewell

California Giant Berry Farms

+1 831 728 1965

FreshPlaza.com

Strawberry monitoring system could add $1. 7 million over 10 years to some farms

A University of Florida-developed web tool can bring growers $ 1.7 million more in net profits over 10 years than a calendar-based fungicide system because it guides growers to spray their crop at optimal times, a new UF study shows.

The Strawberry Advisory System, devised by an Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher, takes data such as temperature and leaf wetness and tells growers when to spray fungicide to ward off diseases. Growers can use the system by logging onto www.agroclimate.org/tools/strawberry or use the website to sign up for email or text alerts.

Before the system was developed, strawberry farmers traditionally sprayed weekly during the November-to-March growing season. Spraying more often than is needed wastes money and can lead to fungicide resistance, said Natalia Peres, associate professor in plant pathology, who led the system’s development.

Not all strawberry growers use the system, but this research might persuade them to do so, said Tatiana Borisova, an assistant professor in UF/IFAS food and resource economics department.

“The study will help additional producers to realize the benefits,” Borisova said. “Increased adoption of this system can increase the profitability of the strawberry industry in Florida, and it will help producers to stay competitive in the market.” Ekaterina Vorotnikova, a doctoral student in food and resource economics, worked on the study to identify how much the web tool could increase profits and yield by reducing spraying for anthracnose and botrytis, two of the crop’s deadliest diseases.

Using a 26-acre farm as her average, Vorotnikova took data collected at UF’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center from 2006-2012 and put it into a 10-year model. She found that using the web tool increased net profit for strawberries with anthracnose by $ 1.7 million and $ 890,000 for those with botrytis. The increased profit stemmed mostly from decreased spraying, Borisova said.

Florida is the nation’s second-leading strawberry producer, behind California. Florida’s crop brings in $ 366 million annually, according to the state Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

“Given that world strawberry production was worth about $ 4.3 billion in 2013, the development and adoption of expert systems for small fruit production operations can benefit millions of farmers worldwide,” Vorotnikova said.

In 2012 and 2013, a UF/IFAS survey found 96 percent of Florida’s strawberry producers said botrytis attacks their crop. Half said they get anthracnose every three to four years, while 40 percent said they get it every year. Fifty-five percent of respondents said they subscribe to text or e-mail alerts about anthracnose and botrytis risk levels from the system, Borisova said.

Traditionally, strawberry growers sprayed their crop with fungicide weekly. But this was not optimal, said John VanSickle, a UF/IFAS food and resource economics professor and a study co-author.

For example, if conditions do not induce diseases, growers sprayed unnecessarily, wasting chemicals and labor and increasing production costs. Second, if weather worsens unexpectedly, farmers might not be able spray. Third, too much fungicide helps build chemical resistance for the disease, VanSickle said.

The study, written by Vorotnikova, Borisova and VanSickle, was published online last month in the journal Agricultural Systems.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The original article was written by Brad Buck. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Strawberry monitoring system could add $1. 7 million over 10 years to some farms

A University of Florida-developed web tool can bring growers $ 1.7 million more in net profits over 10 years than a calendar-based fungicide system because it guides growers to spray their crop at optimal times, a new UF study shows.

The Strawberry Advisory System, devised by an Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher, takes data such as temperature and leaf wetness and tells growers when to spray fungicide to ward off diseases. Growers can use the system by logging onto www.agroclimate.org/tools/strawberry or use the website to sign up for email or text alerts.

Before the system was developed, strawberry farmers traditionally sprayed weekly during the November-to-March growing season. Spraying more often than is needed wastes money and can lead to fungicide resistance, said Natalia Peres, associate professor in plant pathology, who led the system’s development.

Not all strawberry growers use the system, but this research might persuade them to do so, said Tatiana Borisova, an assistant professor in UF/IFAS food and resource economics department.

“The study will help additional producers to realize the benefits,” Borisova said. “Increased adoption of this system can increase the profitability of the strawberry industry in Florida, and it will help producers to stay competitive in the market.” Ekaterina Vorotnikova, a doctoral student in food and resource economics, worked on the study to identify how much the web tool could increase profits and yield by reducing spraying for anthracnose and botrytis, two of the crop’s deadliest diseases.

Using a 26-acre farm as her average, Vorotnikova took data collected at UF’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center from 2006-2012 and put it into a 10-year model. She found that using the web tool increased net profit for strawberries with anthracnose by $ 1.7 million and $ 890,000 for those with botrytis. The increased profit stemmed mostly from decreased spraying, Borisova said.

Florida is the nation’s second-leading strawberry producer, behind California. Florida’s crop brings in $ 366 million annually, according to the state Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

“Given that world strawberry production was worth about $ 4.3 billion in 2013, the development and adoption of expert systems for small fruit production operations can benefit millions of farmers worldwide,” Vorotnikova said.

In 2012 and 2013, a UF/IFAS survey found 96 percent of Florida’s strawberry producers said botrytis attacks their crop. Half said they get anthracnose every three to four years, while 40 percent said they get it every year. Fifty-five percent of respondents said they subscribe to text or e-mail alerts about anthracnose and botrytis risk levels from the system, Borisova said.

Traditionally, strawberry growers sprayed their crop with fungicide weekly. But this was not optimal, said John VanSickle, a UF/IFAS food and resource economics professor and a study co-author.

For example, if conditions do not induce diseases, growers sprayed unnecessarily, wasting chemicals and labor and increasing production costs. Second, if weather worsens unexpectedly, farmers might not be able spray. Third, too much fungicide helps build chemical resistance for the disease, VanSickle said.

The study, written by Vorotnikova, Borisova and VanSickle, was published online last month in the journal Agricultural Systems.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The original article was written by Brad Buck. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Driscoll’s-Wegmans partnership sponsors Strawberry Days fundraiser

Driscoll’s once again partnered with Wegmans Food Markets to sponsor the eighth annual Strawberry Days fundraiser to benefit The Children’s Home Society of New Jersey. The three-day fundraising event aims to promote a healthy summer snack while raising awareness and critical funds for the at-risk babies, children and families of New Jersey.

For each carton of Driscoll’s strawberries purchased at a New Jersey Wegmans location July 18-20, Driscoll’s pledged $ 0.50 to CHSofNJ. On Sunday, July 27 at Wegmans’ Princeton location, Driscoll’s presented a check for $ 20,000 to CHSofNJ, bringing its cumulative Strawberry Days total donation to $ 135,000. Funds raised from this event will directly support the 54 programs and services CHSofNJ provides to the community, including foster care and adoption services, counseling services, school-based services, and a variety of health and educational programs.

“We are so grateful to Driscoll’s and Wegmans for always caring about our children and making a difference in meaningful ways,” Donna C. Pressma, CHSofNJ president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Strawberry Days raises awareness of the needs of our at-risk children and supports the critical programs our agency provides to help them grow into happy, healthy, successful adults. These companies are shining examples of how large corporations can improve the quality of life for our community’s children.”
 
“Helping young people succeed is one of our main giving priorities,” Joe Sofia, Wegmans senior vice president and New Jersey division manager, said in the release. “It’s our pleasure to be involved, partnering with Driscoll’s once again to support CHSofNJ and the incredible work they do to enrich our community.”
 
CHSofNJ thanked Driscoll’s and Wegmans for sponsoring Strawberry Days, and also those in the community who supported this fundraiser.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Driscoll’s-Wegmans partnership sponsors Strawberry Days fundraiser

Driscoll’s once again partnered with Wegmans Food Markets to sponsor the eighth annual Strawberry Days fundraiser to benefit The Children’s Home Society of New Jersey. The three-day fundraising event aims to promote a healthy summer snack while raising awareness and critical funds for the at-risk babies, children and families of New Jersey.

For each carton of Driscoll’s strawberries purchased at a New Jersey Wegmans location July 18-20, Driscoll’s pledged $ 0.50 to CHSofNJ. On Sunday, July 27 at Wegmans’ Princeton location, Driscoll’s presented a check for $ 20,000 to CHSofNJ, bringing its cumulative Strawberry Days total donation to $ 135,000. Funds raised from this event will directly support the 54 programs and services CHSofNJ provides to the community, including foster care and adoption services, counseling services, school-based services, and a variety of health and educational programs.

“We are so grateful to Driscoll’s and Wegmans for always caring about our children and making a difference in meaningful ways,” Donna C. Pressma, CHSofNJ president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Strawberry Days raises awareness of the needs of our at-risk children and supports the critical programs our agency provides to help them grow into happy, healthy, successful adults. These companies are shining examples of how large corporations can improve the quality of life for our community’s children.”
 
“Helping young people succeed is one of our main giving priorities,” Joe Sofia, Wegmans senior vice president and New Jersey division manager, said in the release. “It’s our pleasure to be involved, partnering with Driscoll’s once again to support CHSofNJ and the incredible work they do to enrich our community.”
 
CHSofNJ thanked Driscoll’s and Wegmans for sponsoring Strawberry Days, and also those in the community who supported this fundraiser.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US (CA): Strawberry volume ahead of last year’s pace

Though fluctuating weather conditions have made this a tricky year for California’s growers, strawberry production this season is ahead of what it was at this time last year.

“The season has gone very well, considering all of the weather challenges we’re facing,” said Cindy Jewell, director of marketing for California Giant Berry Farms. “Volume has been consistent, and instead of getting sharp peaks and valleys, volume has come off smooth and consistent. So customers have been supplied in a regular fashion, instead of in swings and gaps.” In addition to smooth supplies, volume has also been ahead of last season. While production from the state’s growers reached 88.3 million flats by this week last year, production this season has reached a little over 90 million flats as of May 22. The timing of this year’s spring holidays has also meant this year’s production has sold quickly.

“Easter was late this year and close to Mother’s Day, so that helped build momentum,” said Jewell. “So retailers were ready to promote when volume was there.” Jewell predicted that the lead the state’s growers have over last year’s production will continue through the rest of the season, into October.

“The fact that we had a light cherry deal also meant strawberries had a dominant space in the produce department,” said Jewell. “So far, this season has gone well, flavour of berries has been great and we’re hoping to continue the positive momentum we’ve had.”

For more information:

Cindy Jewell

California Giant Berry Farms

+1 831 728 1965

FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Weather affects strawberry campaign

Secondulfo PO
Italy: Weather affects strawberry campaign

“The weather deeply affected the campaign, so much so that nothing developed at the usual times,” explains Salvatore Secondulfo, owner of OP Secondulfo, 


Strawberries developed more during the winter months, “therefore we expect lower yields towards the end of the season. Unfortunately, there were less nutrients in the plants during their most productive period.”


According to the owner, there are many factors that influence the campaign. “Due to the change in climate, Germany, as well as other Central and Northern European countries, is now cultivating more fruit, so it can satisfy internal demand and import less produce. In addition, the produce in exporting countries ripened earlier than usual, thus reducing their commercial period.”


“Despite this, we feel the strawberry campaign was good, especially in February, March and April 2014. We are confident we have done a good job, nonetheless, we are open to improvements. Basilicata for example adopted a number of different commercial strategies and achieved good results.”

OP Secondulfo covers around 400 hectares of kiwis, grapes, peaches, strawberries, apricots and nectarines. Produce is sold under the KiwiPiù and MissDolcezza brands.


Contatti:
Annarita Secondulfo
OP Secondulfo
Via Antico Cilento
84091 Battipaglia (SA)
Tel.: +39 (0)828 547515
Fax: +39 (0)828 547519
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.secondulfo.com

Publication date: 5/23/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Weather affects strawberry campaign

Secondulfo PO
Italy: Weather affects strawberry campaign

“The weather deeply affected the campaign, so much so that nothing developed at the usual times,” explains Salvatore Secondulfo, owner of OP Secondulfo, 


Strawberries developed more during the winter months, “therefore we expect lower yields towards the end of the season. Unfortunately, there were less nutrients in the plants during their most productive period.”


According to the owner, there are many factors that influence the campaign. “Due to the change in climate, Germany, as well as other Central and Northern European countries, is now cultivating more fruit, so it can satisfy internal demand and import less produce. In addition, the produce in exporting countries ripened earlier than usual, thus reducing their commercial period.”


“Despite this, we feel the strawberry campaign was good, especially in February, March and April 2014. We are confident we have done a good job, nonetheless, we are open to improvements. Basilicata for example adopted a number of different commercial strategies and achieved good results.”

OP Secondulfo covers around 400 hectares of kiwis, grapes, peaches, strawberries, apricots and nectarines. Produce is sold under the KiwiPiù and MissDolcezza brands.


Contatti:
Annarita Secondulfo
OP Secondulfo
Via Antico Cilento
84091 Battipaglia (SA)
Tel.: +39 (0)828 547515
Fax: +39 (0)828 547519
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.secondulfo.com

Publication date: 5/23/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Food News Today: Is a strawberry actually a berry? (video)

In Food News Today, Phil Lempert asks: Do you know what’s a fruit, berry or vegetable? And he reports on a study that concludes word choices in online restaurant reviews reveal more about the reviewer than the restaurant.

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US (CA): UC Davis asks for strawberry commission lawsuit to be dismissed

TGF-FruitImageUS (CA): UC Davis asks for strawberry commission lawsuit to be dismissedThe University of California, Davis, has filed a motion with the Alameda County Superior Court this week asking that the lawsuit filed against the university by the California Strawberry Commission be dismissed.

“We continue to be disappointed with the actions of the commission and its pursuit of a meritless lawsuit,” said Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi. “The strawberry breeding program at UC Davis is the pre-eminent public breeding program in the world today and the only public breeding program in the state. We are committed to maintaining that status for years to come.”

The strawberry breeding program, housed within the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is focused on developing the strawberry germplasm in the interests of advancing agricultural methods. Consistent with UC Davis’ land-grant mission, the program includes fundamental and applied research as well as plant improvement.

The college’s new dean, Helene Dillard, is also meeting with legislators at the state capitol in Sacramento this week to reaffirm the university’s commitment to the program and address misconceptions set forth in the lawsuit.

California Strawberry Commission

Commission communications director Carolyn O’Donnell said the commission has been trying to resolve issues with the university for several years.

“For the past five years, commission members and staff have met with the university administration to discuss ongoing concerns regarding the management, oversight and long-term viability of the public strawberry breeding program,” according to a statement from the commission.

“During this time, there was no meaningful movement regarding any of these issues. The commission filed this lawsuit as a last resort to protect the public strawberry breeding program.”

O’Donnell said the university breeding program is a “critical” industry partner and the strawberry commission has contributed to it since 1955. She said the commission’s members have given the school more than $ 18 million in the past 25 years.

Among the allegations in its civil suit, the commission says growers are no longer receiving strawberry germplasm specifically developed for them. The commission wants the court to stop UC-Davis from allowing two scientists to control and profit from research and cultivars commission members paid for already.

- See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Fight-continues-between-UC-Davis-and-strawberry-commission-256610531.html#sthash.poFKCots.dpuf

Commission communications director Carolyn O’Donnell said the commission has been trying to resolve issues with the university for several years.

“For the past five years, commission members and staff have met with the university administration to discuss ongoing concerns regarding the management, oversight and long-term viability of the public strawberry breeding program,” according to a statement from the commission.

“During this time, there was no meaningful movement regarding any of these issues. The commission filed this lawsuit as a last resort to protect the public strawberry breeding program.”

O’Donnell said the university breeding program is a “critical” industry partner and the strawberry commission has contributed to it since 1955. She said the commission’s members have given the school more than $ 18 million in the past 25 years.

Among the allegations in its civil suit, the commission says growers are no longer receiving strawberry germplasm specifically developed for them. The commission wants the court to stop UC-Davis from allowing two scientists to control and profit from research and cultivars commission members paid for already.

According to UC Davis, they have currently two copies of the strawberry germplasm, which includes patented varieties, advanced selection lines, breeding stock and historical plants. One collection is in use by the current breeders, and the second collection is being maintained by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. In addition, additional geneticists are currently being recruited to join the program.

“Despite the path the commission has chosen, UC Davis is committed to a long-term positive relationship for the benefit of California strawberry growers and more generally for state agriculture and the public,” added Katehi. “We are hopeful the commission, too, is ready to move forward and continue the important collaboration we have enjoyed for decades.”

Source: UC Davis and The Packer

Publication date: 4/25/2014

 

FreshPlaza.com

French strawberry producers worried for Spanish producers

French strawberry producers worried for Spanish producers

Strawberry production in Brittany is at its peak period at the moment. Strawberries farmed in heated greenhouses are reaching the end of their production, whilst unheated greenhouse strawberries are in full bloom. Strawberry producer, André Hascoet, says that the first few weeks of the season were ”not very dynamic in terms of prices” which are ”slightly lower than usual”. 

As for competition from less expensive Spanish strawberries, Mr Hascoet says that ”It is always a worry because they are present in terms of volume and tend to pull down prices”.  However he continues, ”What worries me is what the Spanish producer is earning. There are packaging and transportation costs, what is the Spanish producer making if they’re sold at €1.50? He has given away his strawberries”.  At such low prices, it is unclear how Spanish producers earn money and Mr Hascoet suggests that maybe they are sending overflow stock to France?

They are also not the same variety of strawberry, gariguettes are full of flavour whilst Spanish strawberries are ”big, round, but do not have much taste”. However he believes that there is room for both products on the market.

Spanish strawberries prices are low because ”The consumer knows that they are not worth 10€/kilo” and would not want to pay more. There are some consumers who will never buy Spanish strawberries because the flavour and quality does not suit them. However, it enables households on small budgets to consume strawberries at a lower price.”

For more information:
Prince de Bretagne
Email: [email protected]
www.princedebretagne.com
 

Publication date: 4/24/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

French strawberry producers worried for Spanish producers

French strawberry producers worried for Spanish producers

Strawberry production in Brittany is at its peak period at the moment. Strawberries farmed in heated greenhouses are reaching the end of their production, whilst unheated greenhouse strawberries are in full bloom. Strawberry producer, André Hascoet, says that the first few weeks of the season were ”not very dynamic in terms of prices” which are ”slightly lower than usual”. 

As for competition from less expensive Spanish strawberries, Mr Hascoet says that ”It is always a worry because they are present in terms of volume and tend to pull down prices”.  However he continues, ”What worries me is what the Spanish producer is earning. There are packaging and transportation costs, what is the Spanish producer making if they’re sold at €1.50? He has given away his strawberries”.  At such low prices, it is unclear how Spanish producers earn money and Mr Hascoet suggests that maybe they are sending overflow stock to France?

They are also not the same variety of strawberry, gariguettes are full of flavour whilst Spanish strawberries are ”big, round, but do not have much taste”. However he believes that there is room for both products on the market.

Spanish strawberries prices are low because ”The consumer knows that they are not worth 10€/kilo” and would not want to pay more. There are some consumers who will never buy Spanish strawberries because the flavour and quality does not suit them. However, it enables households on small budgets to consume strawberries at a lower price.”

For more information:
Prince de Bretagne
Email: [email protected]
www.princedebretagne.com
 

Publication date: 4/24/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com