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NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

“Earthworm casts present in vermicompost contain proteins, vitamins, and micro- and macro-elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium,” explained Johannes Van Staden, lead author of a recent study published in HortScience. Van Staden and colleagues Mayashree Chinsamy and Manoj Kulkarni, from the Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, studied the effects of vermicompost-leachate (VCL) on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress.

To investigate temperature stress, potted tomato seedlings were exposed to temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C and treated with and without vermicompost leachate (1:10 v/v). The experiments of water stress involved established tomato seedlings treated with and without VCL (1:10 v/v) treated with varying volumes (15, 30, and 45 mL) of half-strength nutrient solution. “Most of the morphological parameters of VCL-treated tomato seedlings were not only markedly enhanced at optimum temperature (25 °C), but also exhibited significant improvement under high temperature (30 °C),” the researchers wrote. “At lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C), although VCL promoted several growth parameters of a tomato seedling, this improvement did not differ significantly with the respective controls.”

The water stress experiments showed that photosynthetic pigments and compatible solute contents were significantly reduced in VCL-treated tomato seedlings at 15 mL. “Physiological parameters were reduced within the range of those found in more favorable conditions as observed for 30-mL supply of nutrient solution,” the authors noted. The scientists said that the results of these water stress experiments clearly demonstrate the possibility of using less water resources to produce quality crops.

The results also showed that the constant supply of VCL improved morphological characters, including leaf area and shoot/root biomass, enabling VCL-treated tomato seedlings to perform better. The scientists concluded that vermicompost-leachate is a suitable soil amendment alternative that can significantly improve overall crop performance of tomato seedlings under abiotic stresses. “More importantly, VCL is organic and therefore can be used as an environment-friendly fertilizer supplement,” they added.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

“Earthworm casts present in vermicompost contain proteins, vitamins, and micro- and macro-elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium,” explained Johannes Van Staden, lead author of a recent study published in HortScience. Van Staden and colleagues Mayashree Chinsamy and Manoj Kulkarni, from the Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, studied the effects of vermicompost-leachate (VCL) on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress.

To investigate temperature stress, potted tomato seedlings were exposed to temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C and treated with and without vermicompost leachate (1:10 v/v). The experiments of water stress involved established tomato seedlings treated with and without VCL (1:10 v/v) treated with varying volumes (15, 30, and 45 mL) of half-strength nutrient solution. “Most of the morphological parameters of VCL-treated tomato seedlings were not only markedly enhanced at optimum temperature (25 °C), but also exhibited significant improvement under high temperature (30 °C),” the researchers wrote. “At lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C), although VCL promoted several growth parameters of a tomato seedling, this improvement did not differ significantly with the respective controls.”

The water stress experiments showed that photosynthetic pigments and compatible solute contents were significantly reduced in VCL-treated tomato seedlings at 15 mL. “Physiological parameters were reduced within the range of those found in more favorable conditions as observed for 30-mL supply of nutrient solution,” the authors noted. The scientists said that the results of these water stress experiments clearly demonstrate the possibility of using less water resources to produce quality crops.

The results also showed that the constant supply of VCL improved morphological characters, including leaf area and shoot/root biomass, enabling VCL-treated tomato seedlings to perform better. The scientists concluded that vermicompost-leachate is a suitable soil amendment alternative that can significantly improve overall crop performance of tomato seedlings under abiotic stresses. “More importantly, VCL is organic and therefore can be used as an environment-friendly fertilizer supplement,” they added.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

“Earthworm casts present in vermicompost contain proteins, vitamins, and micro- and macro-elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium,” explained Johannes Van Staden, lead author of a recent study published in HortScience. Van Staden and colleagues Mayashree Chinsamy and Manoj Kulkarni, from the Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, studied the effects of vermicompost-leachate (VCL) on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress.

To investigate temperature stress, potted tomato seedlings were exposed to temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C and treated with and without vermicompost leachate (1:10 v/v). The experiments of water stress involved established tomato seedlings treated with and without VCL (1:10 v/v) treated with varying volumes (15, 30, and 45 mL) of half-strength nutrient solution. “Most of the morphological parameters of VCL-treated tomato seedlings were not only markedly enhanced at optimum temperature (25 °C), but also exhibited significant improvement under high temperature (30 °C),” the researchers wrote. “At lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C), although VCL promoted several growth parameters of a tomato seedling, this improvement did not differ significantly with the respective controls.”

The water stress experiments showed that photosynthetic pigments and compatible solute contents were significantly reduced in VCL-treated tomato seedlings at 15 mL. “Physiological parameters were reduced within the range of those found in more favorable conditions as observed for 30-mL supply of nutrient solution,” the authors noted. The scientists said that the results of these water stress experiments clearly demonstrate the possibility of using less water resources to produce quality crops.

The results also showed that the constant supply of VCL improved morphological characters, including leaf area and shoot/root biomass, enabling VCL-treated tomato seedlings to perform better. The scientists concluded that vermicompost-leachate is a suitable soil amendment alternative that can significantly improve overall crop performance of tomato seedlings under abiotic stresses. “More importantly, VCL is organic and therefore can be used as an environment-friendly fertilizer supplement,” they added.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

“Earthworm casts present in vermicompost contain proteins, vitamins, and micro- and macro-elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium,” explained Johannes Van Staden, lead author of a recent study published in HortScience. Van Staden and colleagues Mayashree Chinsamy and Manoj Kulkarni, from the Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, studied the effects of vermicompost-leachate (VCL) on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress.

To investigate temperature stress, potted tomato seedlings were exposed to temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C and treated with and without vermicompost leachate (1:10 v/v). The experiments of water stress involved established tomato seedlings treated with and without VCL (1:10 v/v) treated with varying volumes (15, 30, and 45 mL) of half-strength nutrient solution. “Most of the morphological parameters of VCL-treated tomato seedlings were not only markedly enhanced at optimum temperature (25 °C), but also exhibited significant improvement under high temperature (30 °C),” the researchers wrote. “At lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C), although VCL promoted several growth parameters of a tomato seedling, this improvement did not differ significantly with the respective controls.”

The water stress experiments showed that photosynthetic pigments and compatible solute contents were significantly reduced in VCL-treated tomato seedlings at 15 mL. “Physiological parameters were reduced within the range of those found in more favorable conditions as observed for 30-mL supply of nutrient solution,” the authors noted. The scientists said that the results of these water stress experiments clearly demonstrate the possibility of using less water resources to produce quality crops.

The results also showed that the constant supply of VCL improved morphological characters, including leaf area and shoot/root biomass, enabling VCL-treated tomato seedlings to perform better. The scientists concluded that vermicompost-leachate is a suitable soil amendment alternative that can significantly improve overall crop performance of tomato seedlings under abiotic stresses. “More importantly, VCL is organic and therefore can be used as an environment-friendly fertilizer supplement,” they added.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

“Earthworm casts present in vermicompost contain proteins, vitamins, and micro- and macro-elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium,” explained Johannes Van Staden, lead author of a recent study published in HortScience. Van Staden and colleagues Mayashree Chinsamy and Manoj Kulkarni, from the Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, studied the effects of vermicompost-leachate (VCL) on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress.

To investigate temperature stress, potted tomato seedlings were exposed to temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C and treated with and without vermicompost leachate (1:10 v/v). The experiments of water stress involved established tomato seedlings treated with and without VCL (1:10 v/v) treated with varying volumes (15, 30, and 45 mL) of half-strength nutrient solution. “Most of the morphological parameters of VCL-treated tomato seedlings were not only markedly enhanced at optimum temperature (25 °C), but also exhibited significant improvement under high temperature (30 °C),” the researchers wrote. “At lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C), although VCL promoted several growth parameters of a tomato seedling, this improvement did not differ significantly with the respective controls.”

The water stress experiments showed that photosynthetic pigments and compatible solute contents were significantly reduced in VCL-treated tomato seedlings at 15 mL. “Physiological parameters were reduced within the range of those found in more favorable conditions as observed for 30-mL supply of nutrient solution,” the authors noted. The scientists said that the results of these water stress experiments clearly demonstrate the possibility of using less water resources to produce quality crops.

The results also showed that the constant supply of VCL improved morphological characters, including leaf area and shoot/root biomass, enabling VCL-treated tomato seedlings to perform better. The scientists concluded that vermicompost-leachate is a suitable soil amendment alternative that can significantly improve overall crop performance of tomato seedlings under abiotic stresses. “More importantly, VCL is organic and therefore can be used as an environment-friendly fertilizer supplement,” they added.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily