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Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

Solution for open land in big cities
Rooftop greenhouse delivers fresh and low transport costs

The scarcity of open land in large cities would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to building a profitable agricultural business in New York City, but Gotham Greens has managed to do just that. With a couple of hydroponic growing operations in the city, they provide high-quality, local greens to the residents of New York and the surrounding area.

“There is not a lot of space available in large cities, and any land that is available is probably more valuable to a real estate developer than to a grower,” explained Viraj Puri of Gotham Greens. Aside from the difficulty of securing land on which to grow fresh produce, the quality of soil in most cities is usually unfit for agricultural purposes. Gotham Greens’ founders looked into growing on rooftops, which are plentiful in New York, but replenishing soil or soil substrate on top of buildings is cost-prohibitive and could structurally compromise some buildings. So Gotham Greens went with a rooftop hydroponic growing system that delivers nutrients to plants via recycled water.

“We employ a nutrient film technique that runs a stream of water just beneath the plant roots,” said Viraj Puri. “The water is recycled, so we use about a tenth of the water that conventional growers use and we can reach yields that are 20 times more than those from conventional crops.” Gotham Greens’ total climate system measures temperature, humidity, light levels and an array of other factors in order to create the perfect growing climate for their greens. The automated greenhouse then adjusts shades, vents and heaters to facilitate optimal plant growth 365 days out of the year. While heating a greenhouse during the cold New York winter uses more energy than a greenhouse in Mexico would ever need, Viraj Puri argues that their energy efficient system and the benefits of local produce outweigh the higher heating costs.

“We don’t have to transport our produce over long distances, so we save on transportation and we use fewer fossil fuels,” said Viraj Puri. “A lot of the design features of our facility and the renewable energy resources we have means we need about half the heating that other greenhouses in New York need.” Because they can pick their greens in the morning and have them in a supermarket later that afternoon also means their products is fresh, relative to greens shipped from Mexico. In fact, their second facility is located on the roof of Whole Foods Market’s flagship Brooklyn location, meaning that the product is only an elevator ride away from farm to shelf. Gotham Greens currently sells all of their produce within a 20 miles radius of their greenhouses where the entire growing process is sterile and insects are used as pest control, so there are no pesticide residues or contaminants to worry about. A longer shelf life and just a higher class of product attracts consumers and ensures repeat sales and premium prices.

“Our focus is on packaged salads and leafy greens that we can sell as a high-quality product and be competitive in retail stores,” said Viraj Puri. “It seems like there are more and more start-ups that are interested in vertical farms and completely indoor growing, so we want to focus on the product. You can only get attention so long for growing in the city, but the product has to stand on its own two feet. We don’t want to focus on trying to re-invent something or come up with a new business model; our goal is to focus on putting out a high-quality product.” Gotham Greens currently has two greenhouses in the New York area that provide their branded greens to retailers like Whole Foods Market, D’Agostino, Fresh Direct and Pea Pod as well as smaller neighborhood grocers. They plan on opening two more greenhouses in 2015, a 60,000 sq ft rooftop farm in Queens and a 75,000 sq ft  facility in Chicago, which is slated to be the world’s largest rooftop farm.

For more information:
Viraj Puri
Gotham Greens
Tel: +1 (646) 458-1747
[email protected]
www.gothamgreens.com

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Corrugated packaging hygienic transport of fresh produce

Corrugated packaging hygienic transport of fresh produce

For those in the fresh produce sector handling vegetables and fruit items, corrugated packaging is the safest solution because every box, tray and carton is only used once as the virgin packaging before it is recycled. This enables growers, retailers and consumers to have optimum hygiene conditions.

Corrugated packaging is a recognised hygienic solution for fresh produce. The industry continues to improve its standards through accreditation that meets the requirements of the food industry as a whole.

A very high temperature is involved in the manufacturing process of corrugated, which exceeds 100 °C whether using virgin fibre or recycled material. Cross-contamination of one product  delivery with another is impossible because each box is used only once.

This aspect of single-use is important: recently, for example, an outbreak of the destructive banana disease Fusarium wilt TR4 has led United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation to urge countries to be vigilant and take measures to prevent further contamination. FAO states “The best way to fight the disease is to prevent its spread, which includes avoiding movement of diseased plant materials and infected soil particles.” FAO specifically advises, “implementation of phytosanitary measures to prevent the spread of the disease through agricultural practices, irrigation and drainage systems, transportation, vehicles, containers, tools or visitors.”

Single-use packaging eliminates the possibility of transfer, via the packaging, of soil particles from one growing area to another.

European Federation of Corrugated Board Manufacturers’ (FEFCO) members are at the heart of a multi-billion Euro state-of-the-art industry that continues to invest in new packaging solutions. Corrugated packaging protects around 75% of European goods in transit. This means it plays a pivotal role by helping sectors like fresh produce deliver goods to market cleanly and safely.

Corrugated packaging can also be adapted to all shapes and sizes, reducing the potential for fruit and vegetable damage or product loss during transportation, warehousing and transfer to shelves. It stops tomatoes from being squashed, safeguards apples from bruising and corrugated boxes have long been used to maintain the integrity of bananas during transport.

Corrugated is the most trusted transport packaging material in Europe and has helped the fresh produce industry to deliver its goods to market safely for over a hundred years. It remains the safe and sustainable packaging solution that it has always been.
 
For more information:
Nathalie Schneegans
FEFCO
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +32 2 6500832
www.corrugated-ofcourse.eu 

Publication date: 9/17/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Trade Association Wants FDA to Change and Reissue FSMA Transport Rule

The National Grain and Feed Association (NGFA) wants the Food and Drug Administration to make significant changes to its proposed rule for sanitary food transportation under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

In addition, the association is asking that FDA reissue language for parts of the rule like it plans to do with the produce safety, preventive controls for human food, preventive controls for animal food, and Foreign Supplier Verification Program rules.

“Given the very significant nature of these regulations, we believe that a second opportunity for stakeholder comment is essential to ensure that the requirements in the final rule are practical, achievable and foster the safe transport and distribution of human and animal food,” read the NGFA comments submitted to FDA on July 30. “Further, we believe FDA has the ability and authority to re-propose the regulations and still comply with the court-ordered deadline to publish a final rule by March 31, 2016.”

FDA has informed Food Safety News that it does not currently have plans to re-release parts of the rule.

NGFA believes in the responsibility of rail carriers and truck transporters to provide clean conveyances and transportation equipment suitable for the type of human and animal food shipped, but it considers some of the proposed FSMA requirements to be excessive and could add unnecessary burdens and costs “without a commensurate improvement in product safety.”

Some of the changes the association requests include:

  • Identifying only the immediate previous haul in bulk trucks or rail cars, rather than the three previous ones.
  • Eliminating the requirement that electronic records be kept in order to comply with rules that “stipulate extensive computer validation.”
  • Doing away with the proposal to exempt shippers, carriers and receivers that have less than $ 500,000 in total annual sales.
  • Deleting the requirement for hand-washing facilities unless human contact with the food could cause it to become adulterated or unfit for human or animal consumption.
  • Clearer definitions for several terms. For example, they say “shipper” should only apply to the party that loads a shipment instead of brokers or third-party logistics operators.

NGFA also recommends that FDA develop guidance on good transportation practices, as well as user-friendly educational materials, pertaining to the safe transport of such products by farms.

In addition, the association wants additional exemptions to be provided for transfers of food between facilities owned by the same parent or corporate entity and for trucks and rail lines that transport the same type of food continually, such as shuttle trains and privately owned railcars that haul grains and oilseeds on a dedicated circuitous route.

The comments express support for various aspects of the proposed rule, including FDA’s tentative conclusion to exempt the transport of live food-producing animals from the regulation and the agency’s intent to provide flexibility to shippers, carriers and receivers concerning appropriate sanitary transportation practices (including not prescribing specific sanitation practices).

NGFA also supports the decision, given constrained U.S. transportation capacity and severe rail service disruptions, not to restrict access for human and animal food to certain classes or types of rail or truck conveyances or transportation equipment.

Food Safety News

Inverness Transport grows against the flow

Inverness Transport grows against the flow

Where many companies are dragging themselves through the economic crisis with difficulty, Inverness Transport BV is, strikingly, making a profit. Over the last few years the company from Zevenaar has even grown against the flow. Manager Richard van den Dolder is proud of Inverness Transport’s tempestuous growth. Nine years ago he was the foundations of the logistics company. Starting out as a self employed company, Inverness Transport now has four employees and transports countless agrarian products throughout the whole of Europe. “The emphasis in our work is on the agrarian transport of mainly potatoes, onions and carrots. Our assortment is growing gradually. We also know what to do with vegetables, fruit, cacao, coffee, nuts, sugar and grains.”

Inverness Transport fills the positions of a bridge between customer and buyer. Distinctive character is the personal service offered. Den Dolder: “It sounds so simple, but it isn’t. We distinguish ourselves from many other colleagues with the extra personal attention that we offer our customers. It’s unusual in our branch. Basically, we make sure that the product is transported safely from A to B. But in the meantime we also take away all the hassle that surrounds transport and the customer. We take care of it completely. The customer doesn’t have to worry about it at all. We make sure that the transport is done well and that the customer is satisfied. This is why, as a manager, I often travel through Europe to personally meet my customers and chat. This extra attention on all sides is important.” Inverness Transport is able to transship truck on location in Zevenaar. For instance to collect multiple shipments and send them by truck. “This increases speed and saves costs.”

The whole of Europe
The Inverness Transport specialists already know their way throughout Europe. There is close contact with the responsibilities at loading and unloading areas and the agrarian products are packaged and transported with care. They collaborate with various transporters from all over Europe for this. “This way we can switch very flexibly if a customer wants to receive a shipment sooner, for instance, Any transport is possible, such as tautliners, cooling and bulk trucks, hopper barges, walking floors and kippers.”

The countries Inverness Transport operates in include France, Belgium, Germany, England, Ireland, Scandinavia, Poland, Switzerland, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Italy and, of course, the Netherlands. “We don’t really have borders. Whether it’s full loads or loose pallets, we have a solution for everything. The customer can hand it over to us with trust.”

For more information:
Richard van den Dolder
Inverness Transport BV
Tel: +31 (0)26-3195170
Email: [email protected]
www.invernesstransport.nl

Publication date: 4/2/2014


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Roots to shoots: Hormone transport in plants deciphered

Plant growth is orchestrated by a spectrum of signals from hormones within a plant. A major group of plant hormones called cytokinins originate in the roots of plants, and their journey to growth areas on the stem and in leaves stimulates plant development. Though these phytohormones have been identified in the past, the molecular mechanism responsible for their transportation within plants was previously poorly understood.

Now, a new study from a research team led by biochemist Chang-Jun Liu at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory identifies the protein essential for relocating cytokinins from roots to shoots.

The research is reported in the February 11 issue of Nature Communications.

Cytokinins stimulate shoot growth and promote branching, expansion and plant height. Regulating these hormones also improves the longevity of flowering plants, tolerance to drought or other environmental stresses, and the efficiency of nitrogen-based fertilizers.

Manipulating cytokinin distribution by tailoring the action of the transporter protein could be one way to increase biomass yield and stress tolerance of plants grown for biofuels or agriculture. “This study may open new avenues for modifying various important crops, agriculturally, biotechnologically, and horticulturally, to increase yields and reduce fertilizer requirements, for instance, while improving the exploitation of sustainable bioenergy resources,” Liu said.

Using Arabidopsis, a small flowering plant related to mustard and cabbage that serves as a common experimental model, the researchers studied a large family of transport proteins called ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which act as a kind of inter- or intra-cellular pump moving substances in or out of a plant’s cells or their organelles. While performing gene expression analysis on a set of these ABC transporters, the research team found that one gene — AtABCG14 – is highly expressed in the vascular tissues of roots.

To determine its function, they examined mutant plants harboring a disrupted AtABCG14 gene. They found that knocking out this transporter gene resulted in plants with weaker growth, slenderer stems, and shorter primary roots than their wild-type counterparts. These structural changes in the plants are symptoms of cytokinin deficiencies. Essentially, the long-distance transportation of the growth hormones is impaired, which causes alterations in the development of roots and shoots. The disrupted transport also resulted in losses of chlorophyll, the molecule that transforms absorbed sunlight into energy.

The team then used radiotracers to confirm the role of the AtABCG14 protein in transporting cytokinins through the plants. They fed Carbon-14-labeled cytokinins to the roots of both the wild-type and mutant seedlings. While the shoots of the wild-type plants were full of the hormones, there were only trace amounts in the shoots of the mutant plants, though their roots were enriched. This demonstrates a direct correlation between cytokinin transport and the action of AtABCG14 protein.

“Understanding the molecular basis for cytokinin transport enables us to more deeply appreciate how plants employ and distribute a set of signaling molecules to organize their life activity and for their entire body building,” Liu said.

“From a biotechnology view, manipulating the activity of this identified transporter might afford us the flexibility to enhance the capacity and efficiency of plants in energy capture and transformation, and the storage of the reduced carbon, or the ability of plants to adapt to harsh environments, therefore promoting either the production of renewable feedstocks for fuels and bio-based materials, or grain yields to meet our world-wide food and energy demands.”

This work was completed in concert with researchers from Palacky University & Institute of Experimental Botany, and St. John’s University. It was funded by DOE’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation toward understanding plant cell wall biogenesis and functions of ABC transporters, respectively.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

FDA Announces FSMA Sanitary Transport Rule

The U.S Food and Drug Administration has filed its rule on sanitary transportation under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), keeping to a court-ordered deadline of Jan. 31.

“Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food” will require certain shippers, receivers, and carriers who transport food by motor or rail vehicles to take steps to prevent the contamination of human and animal food during transportation.

The proposed rule establishes requirements for vehicle and transportation equipment, transportation operations, the exchange of information, training, written procedures and records.

It does not apply to the transportation of fully packaged shelf-stable foods, live food animals, or raw agricultural commodities when transported by farms. Shippers, receivers and carriers involved in transporting food through the U.S. on its way to another country are also exempt.

“This is an important part of the food handling process, one that can introduce contamination even after proper safeguards have been taken by the food producers and processors,” FDA deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, Michael Taylor, wrote on the agency’s blog. “Truthfully, it’s uncommon for a foodborne illness to be caused by contamination during transportation. But we have received reports of unsanitary practices, and we want to minimize this potential source of illness.”

This is the seventh and final rule to be issued under FSMA. It will be published in the Federal Register on Feb. 5, and a comment period on the rule will be opened through May 31. FDA plans to hold three public meetings regarding the rule. The first two on Feb. 27 in Chicago and March 13 in Anaheim, CA, will also address the proposed rule on intentional adulteration. The third will take place March 20 in College Park, MD and will focus solely on the transportation rule.

FDA also announced today that it is extending the comment period for the proposed rule on preventive controls for pet food and animal feed and draft risk assessment to March 31. Comments were originally due by Feb. 26.

Food Safety News

DailyFresh Logistics and Goes Transport join forces in Germany

DailyFresh Logistics and Goes Transport join forces in Germany

Joining forces
The power of this cooperation is the merger of logistical knowledge and experience. There’s a large degree of similarity in the corporate culture, with mutual involvement and a  “Continual  improvement” philosophy. The family owned companies Goes, Visbeen and Post Kogeko have more than 1,000 transport units and they can offer multi-modal logistic solutions throughout Europe by road, water and by rail.

Commercial transfer
The margin on transport to Germany has continued to be under pressure in recent times. Opportunities to improve efficiencies with a focus on sustainability have been assessed. Cooperation with the aim of increasing the flow of goods to Germany is the obvious solution through  optimizing vehicle fill, to reduce the CO2 emission, to increase our quality of service and to guarantee the continuity of our service. 

Goes Transport has proven to deliver high quality and reliable logistic services. In addition there’s a large degree of similarity in the corporate culture, mutual involvement and a philosophy of “Continual Improvement”. That is why DailyFresh Logistics has decided that Goes Transport will take care of their transport activities to Germany as of the 12th of August 2013.

To realize the above, all commercial activities of DailyFresh Logistics related to Germany will be transferred to Goes Transport. Optimization of the large flows of goods, and services  that meet out our customer’s needs are our main goals.
The core business of Goes is international transport. Goes has a fine distribution network in Germany, focusing on the distribution of vegetables, fruits, flowers and plants and has temperature controlled  hubs and warehouses in De Meern and Venlo (the Netherlands).

For more information:

Diana van Zielst
DailyFresh Logistics
Tel: +31 (0)187 607836
[email protected]
Susannah Goes
Goes Transport
Tel: +31 (0)88 007 1991
[email protected]

Publication date: 8/6/2013


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