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Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Short lemon crops in South America and South Africa has generated good opportunities for Turkish citrus exporters this season. Total lemon exports have been up this year, and prices have been good – though decreasing demand from Europe means more of Turkey’s exports are going to the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Our lemons have enjoyed high demand and good prices all over the global market,” said Ayse Ozler of Ozler. “Demand from the Middle East, Europe and Asia has been quite good, higher than in previous seasons, in fact.” Turkish lemon suppliers typically start exporting their fruit during September, about a month and a half before Spanish lemons edged them out of Europe. While prices at the beginning of that export window typically start at 0.70 Euro, prices this season were around 1.20 Euro at the outset of the season.
 
“Volumes from the Southern Hemisphere were low this year because of a frost in Argentina that cut their volumes by about 40 percent,” explained Ayse. “South African supplies of lemons also ran out early, so the gap in supplies was big, and prices for Turkish lemons were the highest we’ve seen.” Last year’s Turkish lemon crop was also affected by frost, so local demand was already strong when the export window came around, further driving up prices. The early boon resulted in 30 percent more lemon export volume out of Turkey, when compared to the previous season.
 
The situation is now different, with Spanish and Italian supplies driving Turkish citrus out of Europe for the year and bringing down prices. But Ayse explained that the importance of Europe is diminishing for Turkish growers. Competition from Spanish fruit and tightened regulations concerning maximum residue limits has steadily decreased the amount of fruit that Turkish exporters ship to Europe. Russia used to be a big market, but problems there, both recent and long-standing, have made it an unattractive destination for Turkish traders. The major areas of expansion are now the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Demand from Europe is reducing, which could be due to prices and the promotion that Spanish fruit gets,” said Ayse. “But the Middle East and Asia have been accepting of this and are curious about our citrus, so the demand there has been increasing as they are happy with the quality of our fruit.”

For more information:


Ayse Ozler
Özler Ziraat
Tel: +90-322-454-77-41
Email: [email protected]
www.hasat.net
 

Author: Yzza Ibrahim / Carlos Nunez


 

Publication date: 12/12/2014
Author: Yzza Ibrahim
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Eren Tarim’s Turkish stonefruit season in full swing

Aysel Oguz: “We are always open to new markets”
Eren Tarim’s Turkish stonefruit season in full swing
Most Turkish exporters are specialised in citrus, but Eren Tarim wished to offer a wider range of fruit and vegetables. Deputy export manager Aysel Oguz said: “We believe it is important for a business to remain active throughout the year. Besides citrus, we also sell figs, stonefruit, melons, pomegranates, pears and various vegetables. At the moment we are in the middle of the stonefruit season, which is very important for our company. We supply cherries, apricots and peaches. “The flowering went well, even though a part of the production was affected by frosts and rain. But fortunately Turkey is a big country with many production areas, so we’ll reach our normal volumes.” The products are marketed under its own brand, EREN.


Aysel Oguz during Medfel 2014

Always open to new markets 

Eren Tarim exports to various countries in Europe, particularly Eastern Europe, and also sees great potential in Asia. “The mindset in Asian countries is very different than in Europe, but it is a great challenge to discover them and supply them. Currently, many stonefruit shipments are made to these countries by air. We are always open to new markets.” This year, Eren Tarim introduced a new marketing campaign with the motto ‘Will to Live’. The new slogan is part of the campaign which marks the 20-year anniversary of the company. “We find it very important to regularly come up with new themes and to promote them in our markets. The presentation of our company and our products is very important to us.”


Aysel is satisfied with the fair Medfel, in which the company took part from 13 to 15 May. “At this fair it is very easy to see who is coming to your stand and to arrange B2B meetings. It is very effective, and without wasting any precious time. Additionally, it is nice that the fair is so compact. It is an event that either not many people know about, or they are not interested in.”



For more information:
Aysel Oguz
Eren Tarim
SARIIBRAHIMLI  MAH.
KIZILYAKA MEVKII NO3/A AKDENIZ
Mersin – Turkey
T: +90 – 324 454 14 87-88
F: +90 – 324 454 14 89
[email protected]
www.erentarim.com

Publication date: 5/22/2014
Author: Gertrude Snoei
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Turkish cherry campaign expected to start a week earlier

Turkish cherry campaign expected to start a week earlier

Alanar Fruit Comp is a Bursa-based Turkish company, established in 2006 and devoted to the cultivation and export of cherries, aprıcots, Japanese plums , nectarıns ,pomegranates  and figs. It has managed to become Europe’s leading cherry exporter and one of the world’s largest fig exporters. 

According to the Turkish agricultural department in a normal year the country currently produces a total of around 400,000 tonnes of cherries per season. For its part, Alanar owns 60 hectares of young plantations which produce approximately 300 tonnes, but it also purchases cherries from small growers in almost every producing region. Alanar Fruıt Comp’s strength is due to 550 hectare comp orchards for stonefruits and pomegranates. These processes are managed by Alara’s two separate firms: Alara Nursery and Alanar Fruit Company.

Yavuz Taner, CEO of Alanar Fruit Comp, assures that the impact of the recent hail storms that hit part or the cherry regions, spring frost was felt mostly by the region of Malatya’s apricot growers, but as regards cherries, which are produced in 70% of Turkey at different altitudes and climatic conditions, the extent of the damages has not been truly significant and a normal season is still expected.

In fact, Turkish cherry trees are in full bloom and some of the earlier varieties have already started bearing some fruit. The harvest of the 0900 Ziraat, which is the most common variety for export, generally begins in the last week of May and this year it is expected to start a week earlier, as long as the weather conditions remain stable. Production volumes, according to Mr Taner, should be satisfactory.

Alanar’s main export destinations are Europe and Russia, and to a lesser extent the Far East, where it ships by air. For the early part of the season, California is the greatest competitor in the Far East, but “we are informed that their fruit is a little bit late and also affected by the weather conditions, which should definitely favour us,” affirms Yavuz Taner.

For more information:
Yavuz Taner
www.alarafidan.com.tr
www.alanar.com.tr

Publication date: 5/2/2014


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Turkish exporters encounter problems this season

Turkish exporters encounter problems this season

The grower network from which Turkish exporters acquire their products makes it difficult for exporters to maintain a uniform level across all exports, and that has made for some issues when Turkish exporters send fruit to EU countries. Further complicating the season for some Turkish exporters, this year’s lemon harvest came in short, which led to problems for exporters trying to secure supplies from a stingy domestic market.

“It’s difficult for exporters to control what they buy,” said Ayse Ozler of Ozler Ziraat in Turkey. “The scale of fresh production is quite small, so within the buying system for export there aren’t good ways of controlling what exporters buy.” Because there are so many small suppliers from which exporters get their produce, it’s difficult to maintain uniform standards for all of the fruit and vegetables they export, especially when small growers aren’t always forthcoming about what went into growing their produce. That can lead to problems when exporting to countries, like those in the EU, that have restrictions on the maximum residue levels which can be present on produce. Further complicating the situation is the the regulatory minefield that exporters have to traverse if they want to do business across multiple continents.

“Often, exporters don’t just export to the European market,” said Ozler. “Typically, Turkish exporters ship to Europe, the Middle East and Russia, and when they buy products they might not have it in mind to ship to Europe, so they don’t take those regulations into account, and it’s only when they get an unexpected offer that they send product there.” That’s led to some issues where produce coming out of Turkey has been deemed by EU countries to contain MRLs above what’s allowed.

For Turkish citrus exporters, this season had additional complications related to domestic supplies of fruit. Warm weather during October, which is when the citrus season normally gets underway, delayed the start of the season by about six weeks. When the season got underway in December, the warm weather made for sluggish demand, noted Ozler. On top of that, when lemon exporters tried to secure fruit for the export season, they found it extremely hard to acquire product.

“The lemon harvest came to an early end due to frost,” said Ozler. “So local people began to collect up supplies of lemons and that made local prices go up. We exporters weren’t able to find any lemons for export, and when we did find them we could only get them for ridiculous prices.”

For more information:
Ayse Ozler
Özler Ziraat
Tel: +90-322-454-77-41
Email: [email protected]
www.hasat.net

 

Publication date: 3/19/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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“Turkish minneola’s small in size but reasonably good market”

Marcel van der Welle, Van Ooijen Citrus:
“Turkish minneola’s small in size but reasonably good market”

Van Ooijen Citrus received the first load of Turkish minneola’s on the 3rd of January. “It is possible to have the minneola’s the last two weeks of December, but that does not show a lot of advantages. The harvest has only just started and our experience is, that the minneola’s could well be a little too short of taste then. We also notice that the clients are busier with the other products and citrus during the last two weeks of the year so a reasonably easily programmed product does not receive full attention” Marcel van der Welle explains.                         

According to the importer the Turkish production is not much different from previous years. “The problem this year is mainly the sizes. Clients prefer minneoloa’s to be slightly bigger and that is different this year because there are too few. In order to prepare a nice variety for us the shipper must also sell a few lorries with small sizes. These mainly go to Russia. The quality, taste and colour are really good.

“The price is about 0.80/0.90/kg depending on the size. There are only a few large sizes, for which we ask more money of course. I think not too much will be available in the large sizes during the coming weeks. The market will remain reasonably clean. A surplus of small sizes may have an influence on the price. In addition to Turkey some from Egypt will also enter the market, but there I also hear the same noise about he sizes” Marcel continues.

“Of course Israeli minneola’s have been on the market since December. Retail, especially, prefers Israel. It looks as if the Turkish minneola has to be rediscovered, because we can easily compete in respect of colour, taste and certainly price” Marcel says. Van Ooijen Citrus mainly sells minneola’s to wholesalers, but also sell the citrus through supermarkets. The company sells the minneola’s in 15 kg open top, 9 kg open top and pitufo of 2.6 kg.

For more information

Van Ooijen Citrus BV

149, Handelsweg,

2988 DC Ridderkerk

Tel: 0180-655555

Fax: 0180-557544

www.vanooijencitrus.nl

Publication date: 1/13/2014


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Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish fresh produce export company Eren Tarim, established in 1993, are right in the middle of a successful minneola season. The holiday season, especially the month of December, is the busiest time of the year and Aysel Oguz from Eren Tarim said that the season has already exceeded the company’s expectations.

Eren exports minneolas to different parts of the world. Also known as a tangelo, this pear shaped variety has very good skin, pulp coloration, along with a wonderful aroma. A hybrid between a mandarin and a grapefruit, the flavour is not too sweet (about 11-13 brix grade) and can even be a bit sour at times. It is said that this mandarin contains high percentage of folic acid which covers about 80% of human needs.

Minneola mandarins are grown in Florida, Turkey and Israel, although Turkish products have always been desirable to customers due to good logistic solutions and the fact that everything is done accordingly to the customer’s demand for quality. It can be shipped for long and short transit times. Along with that, Eren offers different packaging solutions to its customers.

In addition to minneola’s, Eren also offers the mandarin nova, which is a hybrid between the clementine and tangelo. This is also one of the strongest mandarin varieties that  can withstand a long transit. It has very bright orange color and a strong aroma.

The current season is expected to last until the end of January.

For more information:
Aysel OGUZ
Eren Tarim
Tel: +90 324 454 14 87/88
Mob: +90 533 695 58 02
Email: [email protected]
www.erentarim.com

 
 

Publication date: 1/6/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish minneola season ramps up

Turkish fresh produce export company Eren Tarim, established in 1993, are right in the middle of a successful minneola season. The holiday season, especially the month of December, is the busiest time of the year and Aysel Oguz from Eren Tarim said that the season has already exceeded the company’s expectations.

Eren exports minneolas to different parts of the world. Also known as a tangelo, this pear shaped variety has very good skin, pulp coloration, along with a wonderful aroma. A hybrid between a mandarin and a grapefruit, the flavour is not too sweet (about 11-13 brix grade) and can even be a bit sour at times. It is said that this mandarin contains high percentage of folic acid which covers about 80% of human needs.

Minneola mandarins are grown in Florida, Turkey and Israel, although Turkish products have always been desirable to customers due to good logistic solutions and the fact that everything is done accordingly to the customer’s demand for quality. It can be shipped for long and short transit times. Along with that, Eren offers different packaging solutions to its customers.

In addition to minneola’s, Eren also offers the mandarin nova, which is a hybrid between the clementine and tangelo. This is also one of the strongest mandarin varieties that  can withstand a long transit. It has very bright orange color and a strong aroma.

The current season is expected to last until the end of January.

For more information:
Aysel OGUZ
Eren Tarim
Tel: +90 324 454 14 87/88
Mob: +90 533 695 58 02
Email: [email protected]
www.erentarim.com

 
 

Publication date: 1/6/2014


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Turkish Pomegranate Seeds Spread Rare Virus Across U.S.

Four more rare hepatitis A virus cases in the United States were linked over the weekend to Turkish-grown pomegranate seeds by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, raising the total number of cases in the current outbreak to 140 in eight states.

The outbreak strain of the hepatitis A virus is not usually found the United States. The genotype is rarely seen anywhere in Americas, but rather it circulates in North Africa and the Middle East.

Two additional cases in California and one each in Colorado and Hawaii accounted for raising the total from the previously reported 136 illnesses. The 140 hepatitis A illnesses are found in eight states: Arizona (20), California (69), Colorado (26), Hawaii (8), New Mexico (6), Nevada (6), Utah (3), and Wisconsin (2).

All the illnesses are linked to the consumption of ‘Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend’, which was made with pomegranate seeds from Turkey. Almost half of the victims, 61, have required hospitalization.

Known as genotype 1B, the virus was found in clinical specimens of 56 people in seven states: AZ (6), CA (15), CO (22), HI (4), NM (4), NV (4) and WI (1), according to CDC. (The Wisconsin resident was exposed in California.)

This genotype was identified in a 2013 outbreak of hepatitis A virus infections in Europe linked to frozen berries and a 2012 outbreak in British Columbia related to a frozen berry blend with pomegranate seeds from Egypt.

CDC cautions that there is no evidence at this time that these outbreaks are related to the ongoing U. S. outbreak.

The most likely vehicle for the hepatitis A virus, according to both CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a common shipment of pomegranate seeds from a company in Turkey, Goknur Foodstuffs Import Export Trading.

The finding is based on FDA’s trace back and forward investigations and CDC epidemiological work. As a result, FDA will detain shipments of pomegranate seeds from Goknur when they are offered for import into the United States.

Pomegranate seeds from the same shipment were used by Townsend Farms to make the Townsend Farms and Harris Teeter Organic Antioxidant Blends and by Scenic Fruit Company to make the Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels. FDA will be working with the firms that have distributed pomegranate seeds from this shipment from Turkey to help ensure that all recipients of these seeds are notified.

While the Townsend Farms frozen berries were sold at both Costco and Harris Teeter stores, only those sold at Costco stores have made people sick. The CDC profile of those stricken finds:

  • 79 (56 percent) ill people are women
  • Ages range from 1 – 84 years;
  • 82 (59 percent) of those ill were between 40 – 64 years of age.
  • 8 children age 18 or under were also ill. None were previously vaccinated.
  • Illness onset dates range from 3/31/2013 – 6/24/2013
  • 61 (44 percent) ill people (all over 18 years of age) have been hospitalized.
  • No deaths have been reported.

Food Safety News

Italy: Turkish cherry season starts at Cherry Passion

Available until the end of July
Italy: Turkish cherry season starts at Cherry Passion
“As usual, we started importing Salihli and Napoleon Turkish cherries with 26+ and 28+ grades and in 5kg boxes”, announces Stefano Pezzo, sales manager for Cherry Passion Srl.


“In the Verona area we are still harvesting cherries, though they have smaller grades than the Turkish ones. We are expecting a long season, definitely until the end of July.”


“Unfortunately demand is not very high in Italy, especially since the quality was not very good, but from now on we are confident consumers will trust our excellent quality product.”


Contacts:
Stefano Pezzo

Cherry Passion Srl
V.le del Lavoro, 54
37036 San Martino Buon Albergo (VR)
Tel.: (+39) 045 8781138
Fax: (+39) 045 8795266
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cherrypassion.com

Publication date: 7/4/2013


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