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U.S. Mushroom Council enters partnership with Cabot Creamery

The mushroom organization will cross-promote the company’s cheeses in its recipes, and vice versa.

The Mushroom Council expects a co-marketing partnership with Cabot Creamery Cooperative will build awareness of its Blend model, which promotes the use of finely diced mushrooms into proteins to improve health and flavor.

At the same time, the council will also promote Cabot’s cheese varieties including naturally-aged Cheddar, Muenster, Monterey Jack and more in bars, shreds, slices and spreads.

“We are excited to work with the Mushroom Council,” explains Cabot Creamery retail promotions and events manager Ian Ormon.

“It is great to be able to provide our consumers with new usage ideas like The Blend.”

The Council is equally pleased with the partnership.

“The Blend and Cabot’s cheese varieties add more flavor and nutrients to meals,” says Mushroom Council president Bart Minor.

“By cross marketing our products, we can reach new consumer groups that gain exposure to The Blend and many cheese varieties. It will help drive consumers to the dairy, meat and produce departments.

Retailers can use or modify Blend recipes for their meat, foodservice and deli departments, enabling consumers to enjoy  their favorite foods while reducing their intake of fats, sodium, cholesterol and calories, while adding a portion of produce.

To promote The Blend, the Mushroom Council will feature Cabot’s Portobello Alpine Beef Burger. A Grilled Cheesy Portobello Caps with Turkey Sage recipe will also be featured on the council’s consumer site, with links to Cabot’s website.

Cabot Creamery will include the Council’s Blended Lasagna Roll Ups recipe using Cabot Legacy Alpine Cheddar and a Cheeseburger Pizza using Cabot Vermont Sharp cheese on their website, with links to the council’s site.

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

Australia plans to double mango exports to U.S. in 2016-17

While Australian mangoes only represent a tiny percentage of the U.S. market, the relative newcomer is set to expand its presence in North America this year.

Speaking with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Australian Mango Industry Association (AMIA) CEO Robert Gray said hopes were high the sector could double U.S.-bound shipments this year from last season’s 100 metric tons (MT).

In addition, Northern Territory mangoes are expected to be exported to the market for the first time with four businesses registered from the Katherine region.

“Last year we only used Queensland fruit, which meant we only had half the season to supply,” Gray told the broadcaster.

“The aim this year is to start in October and have product going into the US for the full four or five months of the Australian mango season.”

In June, Gray told www.freshfruitportal.com the industry would also be testing new trade routes into the U.S. market this year.

Australia currently has a testing protocol for mango exports to the country.

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

U.S.: Limoneira expands direct sales program

California-based Limoneira Company will now build on its direct lemon sales programs with oranges and other specialty citrus items.

Chief operating officer Alex Teague tells www.freshfruitportal.com the move ties into Limoneira’s One World of Citrus program, meeting the needs of customers not only in the U.S. but throughout the globe.

He says the direct sales method outside the lemon category – in citrus referred to as “round fruit” – has been in trials for a couple of years, but now the it would make up 100% of volume.

“One of the big drivers is the foodservice industry. Whereas probably 70-80% oranges go to retail, only about 20-30% of lemons go to retail,” Teague says.

“So bringing the foodservice-size oranges to coincide with our foodservice business in the lemons is a big help.”

In addition to Navel and Valencia oranges, Limoneira will provide Cara Cara Navels , Moro Blood oranges, Pummelos and Star Ruby Grapefruit from its groves.

The company will partner with Cecelia Packing Corporation for packing Limoneira oranges and specialty citrus.

“Limoneira via Sunkist used to have an orange house up until 2001 – for a variety of reasons it was shut down and we had always planned to going back to packing and selling direct ourselves with the oranges – now just appeared the opportune time with Cecelia to go do it,” he says.

“Like our lemon packing house in Santa Paula, they have a state-of-the-art facility in Orange Cove that’s close to our orange and specialty citrus groves,” Teague says in a release.

In the release, Limoneira director of global sales John Carter says global lemon customers have been asking Limoneira to sell its other citrus varieties for quite a while.

“We look forward to the opportunity to grow the category and connect shoppers to other citrus trees,” he says.

“Customers have appreciated the quality and consistency that they receive with Limoneira’s lemons, and we will deliver these same benefits with our oranges and specialty citrus.”

When asked about the current citrus market, Teague is still upbeat despite some short-term challenges this year.

“I would say the round fruit, because of unusual crop size, some maturing issues, there was a struggle this year,” he says.

“But of course we think that’s only temporary and it’ll work its way out. It was more a seasonal crop condition than it was a market condition. We still have strong confidence in the marketplace and consumption.

“The lemon market is continuing to be very strong. Consumption, from what we can tell comparing stores and restaurants, consumption continues to rise. We continue to have a lot of interest from retail and foodservice to have more fresh lemon programs.”

In terms of the upcoming California deal, he says orchards are getting enough heat units to have good-tasting oranges, and Limoneira has a full water allocation in the San Joaquin Valley.

“For fruit condition we’re very much looking forward to the 2016-17 season,” he says.

www.freshfruitportal.com

 

FreshFruitPortal.com

U.S. distributor goes to court over banana no-show

Long Island-based fruit company Esposito Brothers has launched a lawsuit over an alleged failure to deliver a large shipment of bananas in mid-2013, the New York Post reported.

The publication reported 21,000 boxes of Ecuadorian-sourced Bonita bananas Esposito ordered from Fruit Importers Americas Inc. did not arrive in July that year.

The story reported the lawsuit was against “Ecuador’s biggest fruit conglomerate”, but Esposito declined to comment on the case or provide clarification as to the details.

The suit seeks at least US$ 27 million in damages, the story reported.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

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U.S.: Chiquita buys Dallas cold storage facility

Fresh produce multinational Chiquita Brands has opted to buy a cold storage warehous it was previously leasing in Dallas, Texas, website Bizjournals.com reported.

The 113,000-square-foot facility in Grand Prairie was purchased by Switzerland-headquartered Chiquita and its Fresh Express brand for US$ 19.5 million, the story reported.

The deal was reportedly brokered by Colliers International vice president Marc Bonilla.

“This institutional grade industrial asset combined outstanding functionality with an incredible opportunity for the tenant to expand the building footprint in one of the strongest sub-markets in the country – Dallas/Fort Worth,” Bonilla was quoted as saying.

“This was a strategic purchase on behalf of the tenant — Chiquita Brands International, Inc.”

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

U.S.: Stable start for Chilean orange season despite higher volume

While recent reports suggest quality problems have set back pricing for Chilean lemons and easy peelers, the first weeks of the season showed a strong footing for the country’s oranges in the U.S.

According to figures from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Chilean orange prices stood at US$ 22/15kg (33lbs) box last week, which is similar to the level they were at for the same period in 2015.

South African orange prices were also within the historic two-year average at US$ 24/15kg (33lbs) box.

Chilean orange shipments started in June and until the first week of July they reached 7,483 metric tons (MT), representing a rise of 11% year-on-year, according to Chilean statistics agency Odepa.

As has been the trend at this time of year, the U.S. has accounted for 85% of Chile’s shipments.

In 2015, Chile finished the orange season with 69,170MT exported, recovering from a low of 57,445MT in 2014.

In terms of easy peelers, a representative from the Chilean Citrus Committee has told the local press there has been a lot of fruit with seeds this year due to cross-pollination.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

U.S.: Oneonta pear harvest to kick off in August

Wenatchee, Washington-based Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers (OSRG) expects to soon be shipping “exceptional” fruit with a new crop of pears around the corner. PEars - Oneonta

In a release, OSRG marketing director Scott Marboe said the Bartlett harvest would start in the first week of August with the first loads going out on the week of August 8.

“The Bartletts are beautiful this year,” Marboe said.

“They’re clean, with great size, and we have lots of 90 and larger fruit. Also, our Starkrimson will start close to the same harvest window, giving consumers a great selection of snack-perfect pears.”

In addition to the earlier varieties, Marboe said the Anjous were exceptionally clean this year.

“We did have a drop during the spring heat, so volume will be down in the Hood River area,” he said.

“However, the great size and clean crop will make up for that,” he said, adding the Bosc crop which was expected to start shipping in September and looked great so far.

“Comice are down in volume, but the fruit look to have excellent size, and they will start August 29.”

Red and Green Anjous will start Sept. 12, followed by Seckels and Forelles on Sept. 19. For the Seckel variety, a new 2-pound pouch bag is being offered this year.

“A number of people were asking for additional varieties in pouch bags to add to displays,” Marboe said.

“[The] Pouch is proving to be a great impulse buy in the pear category, and many of our top retail customers are seeing added sales and category increases when displayed.

“We’re looking forward to a great pear season, and we have some exciting promotions lined up for this fall.”

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

The 10 Worst U.S. Foodborne Illness Outbreaks of 2014

This year saw dozens of well-publicized foodborne illness outbreaks caused by everything from bean sprouts to cilantro to caramel apples. Food Safety News has compiled a list of the 10 most harmful U.S. outbreaks of 2014, in terms of both the number of people who died and the number sickened.

This list includes only foodborne illness outbreaks in which investigators determined both the pathogen involved and the food source, which eliminates a number of outbreaks from inclusion.

10. Chia seeds and powder contaminated with Salmonella, 83 sickened. One of the more eyebrow-raising outbreaks of the year was tied to sprouted chia seeds and powder sold in the U.S. and Canada. At least 52 people from Canada and 31 from the U.S. were found to be sickened. [News report]

9. Bean sprouts from Wonton Foods contaminated with Salmonella, 111 sickened. New England residents were hit hard by this recent Salmonella outbreak, in which at least 29 people were hospitalized. [CDC outbreak information]

8. Chicken dish at Food Safety Summit contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, 216 sickened. This outbreak was the perfect recipe for a snarky news headline: Hundreds of people sickened with a foodborne illness at none 0ther than one of the nation’s biggest food-safety conferences. The likely source was a chicken marsala dish served by the conference’s hired catering company. [News report]

7. Foster Farms chicken Salmonella outbreak, 634 total sickened, including 218 in 2014. Coming in at number two on our list of the worst outbreaks from 2013, the nationwide Salmonella outbreak from Foster Farms chicken continued into 2014, sickening another 218 people this year before finally being declared over in July. The outbreak spanned more than 17 months, making it one of the longest-running outbreaks in recent memory. [News report]

6. Wedding dish contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, more than 300 sickened. Contaminated gravy allegedly ruined a special day for more than 300 of the 750 attendees at a wedding in Missouri. Shortly after the wedding, guests began reporting cases of diarrhea and vomiting. [News report]

5. Mexican-grown cilantro contaminated with Cyclospora, 304 sickened. Following a massive outbreak last year involving Cyclospora-contaminated salads and cilantro grown in Mexico, Texans once again faced the brunt of a Cyclospora outbreak from Mexican cilantro this year. The bulk of the illnesses once again hit at the height of summer. [CDC outbreak information]

4. Raw milk contaminated with Campylobacter in Utah, 1 dead and 80 sickened. This outbreak was the subject of a state legislative inquiry in Utah after it contributed to the death of one immunocompromised man. While Utah state law requires that raw milk carry a warning about the potential to carry harmful pathogens, the milk in this outbreak did not. [News report]

3. Bean sprouts from Wholesome Soy Products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 2 dead and 5 sickened. 2014 was a bad year for bean sprouts, which saw numerous outbreaks and even more recalls. The most deadly of the sprout outbreaks was linked to Wholesome Soy Products, where FDA investigators found several problems related to unsanitary conditions during inspections of their facilities earlier this year. [CDC outbreak information]

2. Dual Listeria outbreaks linked to Mexican-style cheese, 2 dead and 13 sickened in total. Mexican-style cheeses were linked to two deadly outbreaks this year. In one, a patient died and eight were sickened by cheese produced by Maryland-based Roos Foods. The other outbreak, linked to cheese produced by Florida-based Oasis Brands, killed one patient and sickened five. [News report for Roos Foods outbreak] [News report for Oasis Brands outbreak]

1. Caramel apples contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 5 dead and 29 sickened. The year’s most deadly outbreak was also its most recent to be announced and likely its most unexpected. While illnesses first appeared in mid-October, public health officials didn’t trace the outbreak back to store-bought, prepackaged caramel apples until mid-December. A complete list of brand names has yet to emerge, but so far we know that Carnival brand and Kitchen Cravings brand caramel apples are among those affected. [News report]

Food Safety News

The 10 Worst U.S. Foodborne Illness Outbreaks of 2014

This year saw dozens of well-publicized foodborne illness outbreaks caused by everything from bean sprouts to cilantro to caramel apples. Food Safety News has compiled a list of the 10 most harmful U.S. outbreaks of 2014, in terms of both the number of people who died and the number sickened.

This list includes only foodborne illness outbreaks in which investigators determined both the pathogen involved and the food source, which eliminates a number of outbreaks from inclusion.

10. Chia seeds and powder contaminated with Salmonella, 83 sickened. One of the more eyebrow-raising outbreaks of the year was tied to sprouted chia seeds and powder sold in the U.S. and Canada. At least 52 people from Canada and 31 from the U.S. were found to be sickened. [News report]

9. Bean sprouts from Wonton Foods contaminated with Salmonella, 111 sickened. New England residents were hit hard by this recent Salmonella outbreak, in which at least 29 people were hospitalized. [CDC outbreak information]

8. Chicken dish at Food Safety Summit contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, 216 sickened. This outbreak was the perfect recipe for a snarky news headline: Hundreds of people sickened with a foodborne illness at none 0ther than one of the nation’s biggest food-safety conferences. The likely source was a chicken marsala dish served by the conference’s hired catering company. [News report]

7. Foster Farms chicken Salmonella outbreak, 634 total sickened, including 218 in 2014. Coming in at number two on our list of the worst outbreaks from 2013, the nationwide Salmonella outbreak from Foster Farms chicken continued into 2014, sickening another 218 people this year before finally being declared over in July. The outbreak spanned more than 17 months, making it one of the longest-running outbreaks in recent memory. [News report]

6. Wedding dish contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, more than 300 sickened. Contaminated gravy allegedly ruined a special day for more than 300 of the 750 attendees at a wedding in Missouri. Shortly after the wedding, guests began reporting cases of diarrhea and vomiting. [News report]

5. Mexican-grown cilantro contaminated with Cyclospora, 304 sickened. Following a massive outbreak last year involving Cyclospora-contaminated salads and cilantro grown in Mexico, Texans once again faced the brunt of a Cyclospora outbreak from Mexican cilantro this year. The bulk of the illnesses once again hit at the height of summer. [CDC outbreak information]

4. Raw milk contaminated with Campylobacter in Utah, 1 dead and 80 sickened. This outbreak was the subject of a state legislative inquiry in Utah after it contributed to the death of one immunocompromised man. While Utah state law requires that raw milk carry a warning about the potential to carry harmful pathogens, the milk in this outbreak did not. [News report]

3. Bean sprouts from Wholesome Soy Products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 2 dead and 5 sickened. 2014 was a bad year for bean sprouts, which saw numerous outbreaks and even more recalls. The most deadly of the sprout outbreaks was linked to Wholesome Soy Products, where FDA investigators found several problems related to unsanitary conditions during inspections of their facilities earlier this year. [CDC outbreak information]

2. Dual Listeria outbreaks linked to Mexican-style cheese, 2 dead and 13 sickened in total. Mexican-style cheeses were linked to two deadly outbreaks this year. In one, a patient died and eight were sickened by cheese produced by Maryland-based Roos Foods. The other outbreak, linked to cheese produced by Florida-based Oasis Brands, killed one patient and sickened five. [News report for Roos Foods outbreak] [News report for Oasis Brands outbreak]

1. Caramel apples contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 5 dead and 29 sickened. The year’s most deadly outbreak was also its most recent to be announced and likely its most unexpected. While illnesses first appeared in mid-October, public health officials didn’t trace the outbreak back to store-bought, prepackaged caramel apples until mid-December. A complete list of brand names has yet to emerge, but so far we know that Carnival brand and Kitchen Cravings brand caramel apples are among those affected. [News report]

Food Safety News

The 10 Worst U.S. Foodborne Illness Outbreaks of 2014

This year saw dozens of well-publicized foodborne illness outbreaks caused by everything from bean sprouts to cilantro to caramel apples. Food Safety News has compiled a list of the 10 most harmful U.S. outbreaks of 2014, in terms of both the number of people who died and the number sickened.

This list includes only foodborne illness outbreaks in which investigators determined both the pathogen involved and the food source, which eliminates a number of outbreaks from inclusion.

10. Chia seeds and powder contaminated with Salmonella, 83 sickened. One of the more eyebrow-raising outbreaks of the year was tied to sprouted chia seeds and powder sold in the U.S. and Canada. At least 52 people from Canada and 31 from the U.S. were found to be sickened. [News report]

9. Bean sprouts from Wonton Foods contaminated with Salmonella, 111 sickened. New England residents were hit hard by this recent Salmonella outbreak, in which at least 29 people were hospitalized. [CDC outbreak information]

8. Chicken dish at Food Safety Summit contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, 216 sickened. This outbreak was the perfect recipe for a snarky news headline: Hundreds of people sickened with a foodborne illness at none 0ther than one of the nation’s biggest food-safety conferences. The likely source was a chicken marsala dish served by the conference’s hired catering company. [News report]

7. Foster Farms chicken Salmonella outbreak, 634 total sickened, including 218 in 2014. Coming in at number two on our list of the worst outbreaks from 2013, the nationwide Salmonella outbreak from Foster Farms chicken continued into 2014, sickening another 218 people this year before finally being declared over in July. The outbreak spanned more than 17 months, making it one of the longest-running outbreaks in recent memory. [News report]

6. Wedding dish contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, more than 300 sickened. Contaminated gravy allegedly ruined a special day for more than 300 of the 750 attendees at a wedding in Missouri. Shortly after the wedding, guests began reporting cases of diarrhea and vomiting. [News report]

5. Mexican-grown cilantro contaminated with Cyclospora, 304 sickened. Following a massive outbreak last year involving Cyclospora-contaminated salads and cilantro grown in Mexico, Texans once again faced the brunt of a Cyclospora outbreak from Mexican cilantro this year. The bulk of the illnesses once again hit at the height of summer. [CDC outbreak information]

4. Raw milk contaminated with Campylobacter in Utah, 1 dead and 80 sickened. This outbreak was the subject of a state legislative inquiry in Utah after it contributed to the death of one immunocompromised man. While Utah state law requires that raw milk carry a warning about the potential to carry harmful pathogens, the milk in this outbreak did not. [News report]

3. Bean sprouts from Wholesome Soy Products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 2 dead and 5 sickened. 2014 was a bad year for bean sprouts, which saw numerous outbreaks and even more recalls. The most deadly of the sprout outbreaks was linked to Wholesome Soy Products, where FDA investigators found several problems related to unsanitary conditions during inspections of their facilities earlier this year. [CDC outbreak information]

2. Dual Listeria outbreaks linked to Mexican-style cheese, 2 dead and 13 sickened in total. Mexican-style cheeses were linked to two deadly outbreaks this year. In one, a patient died and eight were sickened by cheese produced by Maryland-based Roos Foods. The other outbreak, linked to cheese produced by Florida-based Oasis Brands, killed one patient and sickened five. [News report for Roos Foods outbreak] [News report for Oasis Brands outbreak]

1. Caramel apples contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 5 dead and 29 sickened. The year’s most deadly outbreak was also its most recent to be announced and likely its most unexpected. While illnesses first appeared in mid-October, public health officials didn’t trace the outbreak back to store-bought, prepackaged caramel apples until mid-December. A complete list of brand names has yet to emerge, but so far we know that Carnival brand and Kitchen Cravings brand caramel apples are among those affected. [News report]

Food Safety News

Mexico launches anti-dumping probe on U.S. apples

WASHINGTON — Mexico’s Economy Secretariat has launched an anti-dumping investigation on U.S. apples in response to a petition filed by fruit growers alleging U.S. apples entered the Mexican market at below fair market rate, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA’s notice says Mexico initiated the antidumping duty investigation on Dec. 4 on U.S. fresh apples shipped from January to December 2013.

The latest action is in response to a petition filed by a regional producer association, the Unión Agrícola Regional de Fruticultores del Estado de Chihuahua, or UNIFRUT. The state of Chihuahua is the largest producer of apples in Mexico.

Interested parties have until Jan. 16, 2015 to submit responses or arguments for consideration by Economía’s Unidad de Prácticas Comerciales Internacionales.

In the meantime, U.S. apple exports are expected to increase this year by 4 percent to 875,000 tons, primarily on rising shipments to Mexico, said a USDA report released this month on the world apple market.

However, USDA said Mexico’s apple production is forecast to drop 22 percent to 670,000 tons, while imports are expected to increase 15 percent to 260,000 tons.

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Walmart names McKenna U.S. COO

Wal-Mart Stores on Wednesday said that Judith McKenna has been promoted to COO of Walmart U.S., succeeding Gisel Ruiz, who has been appointed EVP of Walmart International.

The appointments are effective immediately, and continue the rapid churn at the senior levels of the retailer’s U.S. operations. That division, still struggling to keep up the sales pace of competitors like Costco and Kroger, replaced CEO Bill Simon in August, and last month saw chief merchant Duncan Mac Naughton resign amid a merchandising shakeup.

Judith McKennaMcKenna, who had been serving as chief development officer for Walmart U.S., will report directly to U.S. CEO Greg Foran. McKenna joined Walmart nearly 20 years ago in its Asda division in her native U.K., eventually serving as Asda’s CFO and COO. McKenna also served Walmart International as EVP of strategy and international development.

At Walmart U.S., McKenna’s initiatives included the development of the newly opened Grocery Pickup facility, which was based on Asda’s success operating similar vehicles in the U.K. McKenna joined Walmart nearly 20 years ago as part of its Asda leadership team in the U.K., where she served as the CFO and COO. She moved to Walmart International as EVP of strategy and international development, and most recently served as chief development officer for Walmart U.S. As chief operating officer, McKenna will lead a team of 1.3 million associates. She will also continue to lead Walmart’s small format stores, development of new formats, expansion of Walmart services and the integration of digital commerce into the retailer’s existing U.S. stores.

“At her core and by experience, Judith is a retailer who has made major contributions to our business throughout her career,” Foran said in a statement. “It’s exciting to bring her skills in managing store operations, small format growth, logistics and e-commerce to an expanded role in our U.S. operations. Her knowledge of global best practices and her success in leading our associates around the world will help drive our Walmart U.S. business forward.”

Gisel RuizRuiz started as a management trainee and gained a depth of experience across key roles in labor relations, operations and human resources. Most recently as COO for Walmart U.S., Ruiz led the retailer’s focus on improving operational efficiencies, opened more than 400 new U.S. stores, and increased representation of women and people of color across operations leadership roles. As EVP of Walmart’s International People Division, Ruiz will be a key member of CEO David Cheesewright’s leadership team.


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“Gisel is an inspirational leader who has consistently contributed to Walmart’s growth and success throughout her 22 years with the company. Her proven track record and unwavering commitment to our associates make her the perfect choice for this new role,” said Cheesewright. “The expertise and leadership that Gisel brings are needed as we take our International Division to the next level. I’m looking forward to the impact she’ll have on our associates and business around the world.”

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Mexico Blocks U.S. Hogs at Border Over Diarrheal Disease

U.S. hog farmers exporting to Mexico are going to have more hoops to jump through.

In reaction to a multistage outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea, or PED, among piglets in the U.S., Mexico has officially imposed a ban on further hog imports. This will mean more restrictions and more inspections of U.S. hogs entering Mexico; clearing the border will only occur on a case-by case basis.

PED is a fairly common illnesses among hog populations, with symptoms said to be similar to
gastroenteritis. The current outbreak involves hogs in 13 states. It was first identified by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) on May 17.

Mexico’s National Food Health, Safety and Quality Service (Senasica) has asked USDA for technical information about the PED outbreak and measures being used in the U.S. to prevent it from spreading. The Mexican agency also wants information on actions taken by the U.S. to ensure that exports are safe.

PED is not a reportable disease under the rules of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). It is typically spread by animal-to-animal contact or by contaminated equipment they come into contact with.

In announcing its action at the border, Mexico said it was thing the following preventive actions, including:

  • Asking USDA for its risk mitigation strategies.
  • Increasing epidemiological surveillance of hog farms to spot any spike in pig mortality.
  • Keeping hogs imported prior to May 17 under quarantine.
  • Inspecting locations where hogs were brought into Mexico during the last three months.

So far, Mexico has no reported cases of the disease and plans what it calls “extreme vigilence to keep it that way.

Officially called the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), the illness in hogs has no effect on port safety.”

“Since PEDV is widespread in many countries, it is not a trade-restricting disease, but rather a production-related disease,” according to a National Pork Board statement.

Food Safety News