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Zespri will take the new kiwi variety to Spain

Zespri will take the new kiwi variety to Spain

Zespri Iberica, subsidiary of New Zealand’s multinational engaged in the production and marketing of kiwifruit, has announced plans to introduce a new gold variety into the Spanish market in the next two or three years, the result of a project that is already very advanced.

The marketing manager of the company, Enrique Guío, announced the structure and Zespri’s objectives in the present and in the future. Today, the company sells three varieties of kiwi worldwide: Green (70%), Gold (26%) and organic (4%), but they only distribute the first two varieties in Spain.

“We want our product to arrive in the best possible quality to the customer, and we developed a strict control process called Zespri system,” said the Firm’s manager.

Source: Inforteail

Publication date: 6/25/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Enza Zaden variety showcase report

Enza Zaden variety showcase report

The 2014 Enza Zaden variety showcase was held September 25th at the company’s research station in San Juan Bautista, California. With 250 local and international growers and retailers in attendance, the partnership-themed event was an opportunity to assess growth potential through a fresh lens fuelled by strong relationships with seed partners; ongoing innovation in varieties, packaging and branding; understanding supermarket produce operations; and ultimately, maintaining awareness of evolving consumer tastes.

Keynote speaker and packaged-produce pioneer Paul Mastronardi, CEO of Mastronardi Produce Inc., set the stage with unique insights into brand-building through quality seed partnerships, highlighting the incredibly successful SUNSET® brand that features Enza Zaden’s ‘Campari’ and ‘Y.E.L.O’ tomato varieties. Next, Executive Chef Todd Fisher of the infamous Tarpy’s Roadhouse, shopped the fertile fields of the Salinas Valley for relevant, healthy and interesting ingredients, and then served up an interactive culinary experience to wake the taste buds of even the most discerning foodies. Finally, the product and research experts from Enza Zaden were on hand to talk crop development, shelf life and consumer trends, as growers and retailers toured the display of lettuce, spinach, arugula, peppers, cauliflower, leek, onion, zucchini, parsley, dill, cilantro, basil varieties, and the largest 100% organic assortment in North America.

“The team put considerable effort into exceeding expectations with this year’s showcase, and I’m very proud of the result. Growers and retailers came away from the event with new insights into gearing production in accordance with consumer tastes, and energized by the potential to grow their current operations through enhanced partnership with Enza Zaden,” said Ton van der Velden, President and CEO, Enza Zaden North America.

Mastronardi spoke of how his company purposely approaches its business as an innovator and trendsetter. “Years ago when marketshare among produce growers was primarily based on size and volume, we developed a strategy focused on the unique appeal of tastier, well-packaged produce. The resulting ‘Campari’ and ‘Y.E.L.O’ tomato varieties derived from our partnership with Enza Zaden have the flavour consumers are looking for, and have established our leadership position in the industry,” Mastronardi said.

The partnership between Enza Zaden and the Mastronardi group is a useful model for all growers and retailers keen to innovate, develop new products and expand their businesses. Partnership examples closer to home include several organic and conventional growers that work with Enza Zaden to develop some of the most easily recognized brands on today’s grocery shelves, including:
 

  • Earthbound Farm Organic ‘Easy Leaves Butter’ and ‘Easy Leaves Petites’
  • Earthbound Farm Organic Baby Arugula Clamshells
  • Steinbeck ‘Nature’s Reward’ Iceberg
  • D’Arrigo Bros. 3-pack ‘Andy Boy’ Romaine Hearts
  • Taylor Farms Spring Mix
  • Taylor Farms Baby Spinach
  • Tanimura & Antle ‘Artisan’ Lettuce
  • Gills Onions
  • California Endive Farms ‘Organic Belgian Endive’
  • RC Farms Green Leaf
  • Dole Vegetables Green Leaf
  • Wilson Bon ‘Mighty Minis’ Peppers
  • Rocket Farms Organic Potted Basil


“Enza Zaden is well-entrenched in the Salinas Valley, where we demonstrate ongoing commitment to grower success through our robust iceberg, romaine and green leaf lettuce programs, and our speciality market programs in butterhead, oak leaf and lolla rossa. Growers and retailers looking to partner can count on pure, premium quality, high-germinating seed with the needed resistances, extended shelf life, and our ongoing research and variety innovation,” said Nick Barnes, Direct Sales Manager.

With the largest 100% organic assortment in North America, commercial organic growers and retailers can also count on Vitalis Organic Seed, the organic division of Enza Zaden, for the quantity, quality and assortment of premium seed varieties required to develop successful organic operations in the currently $ 35.1B organic industry.

Erica Renaud, Business Development Manager for Organics and Herbs, indicated partnerships with organic growers to date have been extremely rewarding, a trend expected to continue with new arugula, basil and spinach varieties, and specifically with the company’s unique innovations relevant to organic production systems, including advanced resistance to downy mildew and extended shelf life. “With more than 150 organic varieties, the most in-depth breeding and global seed production program dedicated to organic agriculture, we’re well-positioned to help commercial organic growers leverage the rapid growth of the sector, through partnerships that create the unique and flavourful products consumers are looking for in certified organic form,” Renaud said.
 

Publication date: 9/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

SEPC plans variety of events for 2014 Fall Conference

STEP-UPP-2014At the Southeast Produce Council fall conference, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its STEP-UPP program, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall (front row, third from right) of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page (left), who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.The Southeast Produce Council has an exciting and varied lineup of events planned for its annual fall conference, set this year to take place Sept. 25-27 at Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa in Young Harris, GA. This year’s theme is The Hoedown Touchdown Throwdown in Brasstown.

Last year’s fall conference in Myrtle Beach, SC, drew 287 registrants, and David Sherrod, the council’s assistant executive director, told The Produce News at the end of August that around 255 people had registered for this year’s conference so far. “When it’s all said and done, I think we’ll be right about the same number,” he estimated.

The council, which was founded in 1999 and thus is celebrating its 15th anniversary, held its fall conference at Brasstown Valley back in 2008. “It’s a beautiful place to take in nature,” said Sherrod.  “And we’ve got the whole resort to ourselves this time. We’re excited about that.”

Following meetings for committees and directors Thursday morning and afternoon, Sept. 25, the conference officially kicks off that evening with the Get Acquainted Hoedown at Brasstown with the Shoal Creek Bluegrass Band, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

On Friday, Sept. 26, two workshops will be held. Workshop I: Defining Locally Grown, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., will feature speakers Teri Miller of Delhaize America, Joe Watson of Rouse’s Supermarkets, Mike Tipton of K-VA-T, Darvel Kirby of United Supermarkets and Matthew Roy of US Foods. Workshop II: The Future of Online Grocers, which will be held from 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., will be moderated by Jonna Parker of Nielsen Perishables Group and will feature speakers Kenneth Todd of Delhaize America, Lucinda Clark of Space Girl Organics and Tony Stallone of Peapod.

The general session and luncheon will follow, beginning at 11:30 a.m. John Smoltz, a former Major League Baseball pitcher and current MLB network analyst, will deliver the keynote address. In his playing career, Smoltz was a World Series champion in 1995 for the Atlanta Braves, was an eight-time MLB All-Star, was Most Valuable Player of the 1992 National League Championship Series, and is one of 16 pitchers in MLB history to record 3,000 strikeouts during his career.

Also at the general session, Lucy Klausner, senior development officer of corporate partnerships at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, will speak about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables in the fight against childhood obesity. In her work at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta,

Outgoing SEPC President Andrew Scott of The Nickey Gregory Co. LLC then will deliver the State-of-the-Council address, and the committee chairs will give brief reports on their respective committees’ programs.

The council will officially launch its new leadership program for women called Southern Roots with a reception from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Teri Miller, a member of the SEPC board of directors and chairperson of this year’s fall conference, is also chairing the new Southern Roots program. It is “designed to make meaningful connections among women working in the produce industry through events, education and mentoring,” according to the council’s website.

Friday’s event will conclude with the always popular President’s Dinner Dance, which will begin at 7 p.m. Andrew Scott will be honored for his two years’ service as SEPC president, and the new slate of officers and directors will be introduced to attendees.

Also at the President’s Dinner Dance, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its Southeast Training Education Program for Upcoming Produce Professionals, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page, who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.

On Saturday, Sept. 27, the council will hold its 15th annual Ken Lanhardt Memorial Golf Tournament at the Brasstown Valley’s golf course. Registration will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 8:15 a.m, and the tournament will start at 8:30 a.m. The golf awards reception will follow, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

For non-golfers, the council will hold a Sporting Clays Tournament. Check-in will take place from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., and the tournament, at Noontootla Creek Farms in Blue Ridge, GA, about 30 minutes from the resort, will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Spouses may sign up for a tour of the Eagle Fork Vineyards. Check-in will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., and the tour will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation will be provided.

As always, the fall conference will conclude Saturday with the Ultimate Tailgate Party, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

SEPC plans variety of events for 2014 Fall Conference

STEP-UPP-2014At the Southeast Produce Council fall conference, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its STEP-UPP program, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall (front row, third from right) of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page (left), who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.The Southeast Produce Council has an exciting and varied lineup of events planned for its annual fall conference, set this year to take place Sept. 25-27 at Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa in Young Harris, GA. This year’s theme is The Hoedown Touchdown Throwdown in Brasstown.

Last year’s fall conference in Myrtle Beach, SC, drew 287 registrants, and David Sherrod, the council’s assistant executive director, told The Produce News at the end of August that around 255 people had registered for this year’s conference so far. “When it’s all said and done, I think we’ll be right about the same number,” he estimated.

The council, which was founded in 1999 and thus is celebrating its 15th anniversary, held its fall conference at Brasstown Valley back in 2008. “It’s a beautiful place to take in nature,” said Sherrod.  “And we’ve got the whole resort to ourselves this time. We’re excited about that.”

Following meetings for committees and directors Thursday morning and afternoon, Sept. 25, the conference officially kicks off that evening with the Get Acquainted Hoedown at Brasstown with the Shoal Creek Bluegrass Band, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

On Friday, Sept. 26, two workshops will be held. Workshop I: Defining Locally Grown, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., will feature speakers Teri Miller of Delhaize America, Joe Watson of Rouse’s Supermarkets, Mike Tipton of K-VA-T, Darvel Kirby of United Supermarkets and Matthew Roy of US Foods. Workshop II: The Future of Online Grocers, which will be held from 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., will be moderated by Jonna Parker of Nielsen Perishables Group and will feature speakers Kenneth Todd of Delhaize America, Lucinda Clark of Space Girl Organics and Tony Stallone of Peapod.

The general session and luncheon will follow, beginning at 11:30 a.m. John Smoltz, a former Major League Baseball pitcher and current MLB network analyst, will deliver the keynote address. In his playing career, Smoltz was a World Series champion in 1995 for the Atlanta Braves, was an eight-time MLB All-Star, was Most Valuable Player of the 1992 National League Championship Series, and is one of 16 pitchers in MLB history to record 3,000 strikeouts during his career.

Also at the general session, Lucy Klausner, senior development officer of corporate partnerships at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, will speak about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables in the fight against childhood obesity. In her work at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta,

Outgoing SEPC President Andrew Scott of The Nickey Gregory Co. LLC then will deliver the State-of-the-Council address, and the committee chairs will give brief reports on their respective committees’ programs.

The council will officially launch its new leadership program for women called Southern Roots with a reception from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Teri Miller, a member of the SEPC board of directors and chairperson of this year’s fall conference, is also chairing the new Southern Roots program. It is “designed to make meaningful connections among women working in the produce industry through events, education and mentoring,” according to the council’s website.

Friday’s event will conclude with the always popular President’s Dinner Dance, which will begin at 7 p.m. Andrew Scott will be honored for his two years’ service as SEPC president, and the new slate of officers and directors will be introduced to attendees.

Also at the President’s Dinner Dance, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its Southeast Training Education Program for Upcoming Produce Professionals, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page, who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.

On Saturday, Sept. 27, the council will hold its 15th annual Ken Lanhardt Memorial Golf Tournament at the Brasstown Valley’s golf course. Registration will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 8:15 a.m, and the tournament will start at 8:30 a.m. The golf awards reception will follow, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

For non-golfers, the council will hold a Sporting Clays Tournament. Check-in will take place from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., and the tournament, at Noontootla Creek Farms in Blue Ridge, GA, about 30 minutes from the resort, will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Spouses may sign up for a tour of the Eagle Fork Vineyards. Check-in will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., and the tour will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation will be provided.

As always, the fall conference will conclude Saturday with the Ultimate Tailgate Party, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

SEPC plans variety of events for 2014 Fall Conference

STEP-UPP-2014At the Southeast Produce Council fall conference, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its STEP-UPP program, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall (front row, third from right) of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page (left), who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.The Southeast Produce Council has an exciting and varied lineup of events planned for its annual fall conference, set this year to take place Sept. 25-27 at Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa in Young Harris, GA. This year’s theme is The Hoedown Touchdown Throwdown in Brasstown.

Last year’s fall conference in Myrtle Beach, SC, drew 287 registrants, and David Sherrod, the council’s assistant executive director, told The Produce News at the end of August that around 255 people had registered for this year’s conference so far. “When it’s all said and done, I think we’ll be right about the same number,” he estimated.

The council, which was founded in 1999 and thus is celebrating its 15th anniversary, held its fall conference at Brasstown Valley back in 2008. “It’s a beautiful place to take in nature,” said Sherrod.  “And we’ve got the whole resort to ourselves this time. We’re excited about that.”

Following meetings for committees and directors Thursday morning and afternoon, Sept. 25, the conference officially kicks off that evening with the Get Acquainted Hoedown at Brasstown with the Shoal Creek Bluegrass Band, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

On Friday, Sept. 26, two workshops will be held. Workshop I: Defining Locally Grown, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., will feature speakers Teri Miller of Delhaize America, Joe Watson of Rouse’s Supermarkets, Mike Tipton of K-VA-T, Darvel Kirby of United Supermarkets and Matthew Roy of US Foods. Workshop II: The Future of Online Grocers, which will be held from 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., will be moderated by Jonna Parker of Nielsen Perishables Group and will feature speakers Kenneth Todd of Delhaize America, Lucinda Clark of Space Girl Organics and Tony Stallone of Peapod.

The general session and luncheon will follow, beginning at 11:30 a.m. John Smoltz, a former Major League Baseball pitcher and current MLB network analyst, will deliver the keynote address. In his playing career, Smoltz was a World Series champion in 1995 for the Atlanta Braves, was an eight-time MLB All-Star, was Most Valuable Player of the 1992 National League Championship Series, and is one of 16 pitchers in MLB history to record 3,000 strikeouts during his career.

Also at the general session, Lucy Klausner, senior development officer of corporate partnerships at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, will speak about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables in the fight against childhood obesity. In her work at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta,

Outgoing SEPC President Andrew Scott of The Nickey Gregory Co. LLC then will deliver the State-of-the-Council address, and the committee chairs will give brief reports on their respective committees’ programs.

The council will officially launch its new leadership program for women called Southern Roots with a reception from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Teri Miller, a member of the SEPC board of directors and chairperson of this year’s fall conference, is also chairing the new Southern Roots program. It is “designed to make meaningful connections among women working in the produce industry through events, education and mentoring,” according to the council’s website.

Friday’s event will conclude with the always popular President’s Dinner Dance, which will begin at 7 p.m. Andrew Scott will be honored for his two years’ service as SEPC president, and the new slate of officers and directors will be introduced to attendees.

Also at the President’s Dinner Dance, the council will recognize the members of the 2014 graduating class of its Southeast Training Education Program for Upcoming Produce Professionals, which is co-chaired by SEPC board member Faye Westfall of DiMare Fresh Tampa and by Tom Page, who is retired from Supervalu and who is a former president of the council.

On Saturday, Sept. 27, the council will hold its 15th annual Ken Lanhardt Memorial Golf Tournament at the Brasstown Valley’s golf course. Registration will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 8:15 a.m, and the tournament will start at 8:30 a.m. The golf awards reception will follow, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

For non-golfers, the council will hold a Sporting Clays Tournament. Check-in will take place from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., and the tournament, at Noontootla Creek Farms in Blue Ridge, GA, about 30 minutes from the resort, will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Spouses may sign up for a tour of the Eagle Fork Vineyards. Check-in will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., and the tour will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation will be provided.

As always, the fall conference will conclude Saturday with the Ultimate Tailgate Party, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New Zealand’s eve™ single variety apple juice launched in Malaysia

New Zealand’s eve™ single variety apple juice launched in Malaysia

The Heartland Group, a consortium of apple growers in New Zealand have created the world’s first commercially viable single strain apple juice made from its signature eve™ apples. eve™ Juice made its global debut in Malaysia today at Jason’s Food Hall, Bangsar Shopping Complex. The pure, no-preservatives, no-added sugar, cloudy apple juice which is available in one-litre glass carafes is exclusive to the GCH Retail Group in Malaysia namely Jasons Food Hall, Mercato and Cold Storage.
Single strain apple juice is superior as it allows the natural flavour to remain largely unchanged and preserves the taste and the aroma of the apple. In contrast, multiple-variety apple juices usually require sugar and the use of other additives to stabilise the taste.

eve™ Apples, discovered and cultivated only in New Zealand, is a popular apple worldwide and is naturally heavy in juice.  The natural sweetness of the apple also means there’s no sugar needed in the bottled juice, making it a healthier choice especially for children. The natural tanginess and tartness of eve™ apples makes it the ideal apple for juicing.

Brendon Osborn, General Manager of Heartland Fruit gave an insightful talk on apples grown in New Zealand and the various uses of the many varieties of apples. Clearly a passionate fruit marketer, Mr Osborn explained that apples are the ‘core’ of what they do at Heartland Fruit. eve™ apples are grown and made using a method called Applecraft™, which is a proven method of growing superior quality apples.
“Because we love apples, over the years we have fine-tuned a rigorous quality process which ensures that every block of our orchard produces consistent good quality apples. We call this quality process Applecraft™ which acts as standard guideline on how we grow, harvest, pack and ship apples. It is a way we ensure the right things we do to grow apples, gets passed on from generation to generation,” said Mr Osborn.

“With great apples comes great juice. eve™ Juice is a pure, fresh beautiful cloudy juice with no added sugar, and in it you can actually taste a bottle-full of eve™ apples!,” Mr Osborn added.

The guest of honour at the launch of eve™ Juice, New Zealand Trade Commissioner, Mr Matt Ritchie emphasized the growing demand for natural, honest products that New Zealand is renowned for. “Research in New Zealand reveals that consumers are moving towards natural additive-free products, and are willing to pay a higher price for a quality product. Our apples, much like our other fruits are sought after globally for its superior quality and this comes essentially from the earth, climate and environment they are cultivated in, and of course, the methods passed down through generations.”

The Heartland Fruit group is made up of four passionate apple orchadists based in Nelson, New Zealand. Together they produce a range of apples called Luv’ya™ apples. The Luv’ya™ apples range include old favourites such as Royal Gala, and Braeburn. Heartland are also growers of proprietary varieties such as the sweet, tart and popular Pink Lady™, sweet, crunchy and flavourful Ambrosia™ and the juicy and firm Smitten™ which is another variety from New Zealand’s apple breeding programme.  Heartland owns the growing rights for the bright red and juicy crisp eve™ and the strong and sweet Divine™.

According to Mr Osborn, the company chose to launch the juice in Malaysia first, as the market had shown a demand for good quality pure apple juice amongst the discerning consumers according to its exclusive retail partner in Malaysia GCH Retail Malaysia.

“We pride ourselves in delighting our customers with new arrivals in gourmet gastronomy from all over the world. Having the world launch of eve™ Juice at Jason’s Food Hall is indeed an honour and an endorsement of our mutual commitment to top quality products,” said Mie Shareen, Store Manager of Jason’s Food Hall.
Each bottle contains the juice of eight apples and will be available at an introductory price at RM19.99 at Jasons Food Hall, Mercato and Cold Storage.
As part of the launch, Chef Roizz from Berjaya University College of Hospitality gave an interesting food demonstration using eve™ apples, eve™ Juice and a range of Luv’ya apples from Heartland Fruit. He showed how to make delicious, mouth-watering Waldorf Salad, Apple Crumble and a smooth apple mocktail using eve™ Juice.

For more information:
Retna Malar
All About Fresh Produce
Tel: +60 122339571
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 9/11/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Packaged produce means less time, less waste, more variety

U.S. Market Trends:
Packaged produce means less time, less waste, more variety

More than 70% of U.S. households consume bagged/packaged salads. Considering the hectic pace of the average American’s daily routine, reliance on the convenience and variety offered by bagged salads and other types of ready-to-eat vegetables and fruit will be a key factor spurring the U.S. market for these products from $ 5.5 billion in 2013 to $ 7 billion by 2018, according to Branded Packaged Produce and Salads: U.S. Market Trends, a recent report by market research publisher Packaged Facts.

Consumers can incorporate these healthy bagged foods into their diets without the washing, peeling, trimming, chopping, and other steps often required when preparing fresh produce. Waste and spoilage are minimized. Value-added products packaged with condiments or toppings that complement the specific blend of fruits or vegetables take the guesswork out of how to serve the dish or the meal.

Interestingly enough, bagged/packaged salad consumers are exceptionally likely to exhibit foodie attitudes and behaviours, notes Packaged Facts research director David Sprinkle. Consumers with adventurous palates have the opportunity to sample foods they may be unfamiliar with, such as quinoa, soba noodles, edamame, and especially greens like those often found in spring mix (e.g., mizuna, tango, arugula, radicchio, lolla rosa, tatsoi, chicory, frisee, mache).

Furthermore, the report reveals that consumers of branded packaged produce and salads are well above average in many health-related respects. They are trend-setters as well, trying any new diet or health food, and knowledgeable, as friends seek their advice about health and nutrition.

For more information on Branded Packaged Produce and Salads: U.S. Market Trends and other reports in Packaged Facts’ industry-leading catalogue of food and beverage market research reports please visit: www.packagedfacts.com/.

Publication date: 8/22/2014


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Rijk Zwaan introduces new endive variety at demo days

Rijk Zwaan introduces new endive variety at demo days

Rijk Zwaan held this year’s demo days in Fijnaart from 16 June to 4 July. Growers, nursery owners, processors and other business partners were once again cordially invited to inspect the trial field and to discuss the latest developments in open field crops with Rijk Zwaan’s specialists.

One particular highlight was the new endive variety, 11-602. While sharing the same characteristics as its predecessors, this variety can also be grown in the summer. Also on display in the demo field were new varieties of celery, iceberg lettuce and Crunchy cos, which is a flavoursome cross between iceberg and romaine lettuce.

“Visitors came from a wide range of different countries, including the USA, Spain, France and New Zealand, and their feedback was very positive”, says trial field coordinator Arno van Oers of Rijk Zwaan. “We noticed that many people value the fact that visits are by appointment only. That means that we have plenty of time to show our customers round the demo field properly.”
 
For more information:
Sabrina van Kester
Rijk Zwaan
Tel: +31 (0) 174 532 123

   
 

Publication date: 7/7/2014


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New Galia variety changes skin colour when ready to harvest

Nunhems:
New Galia variety changes skin colour when ready to harvest

With a taste of the traditional Galia melon, the new variety “Kirene” combines the high sugar level of a Galia with an extended shelf life that allows it to ship throughout Europe. “Kirene is a Galia variety, but with a nice, yellow appearance,” said Claude Guérin of Nunhems Produce Chain Specialist. Nunhems is the vegetable seed business of Bayer CropScience, and Guérin said they developed Kirene to specifically meet consumer desires. “In the past you could get melons that were yellow but weren’t ripe,” said Guérin. “But the color of the Kirene lets you know when it’s ripe, and it makes life easier for everyone along the supply chain.”

To secure the supply chain, it’s bred so that it matures from green to yellow when it’s ready to harvest, making it easy for growers, retailers and consumers to know for certain when the fruit reaches maturity. This happens at a time during the summer season when no other melons on the European market can boast such an appearance.

On top of that, Kirene has a wonderful scent which engages shoppers to buy it more than any others. “Kirene is good for retailers because during June and July, when it’s available, it’s the only variety that has all the external signs of maturity,” said Guérin. Growers also appreciate the resiliency of the plants during the growing season and the yields during harvest. But most importantly, the fruit always turns yellow when mature, and it’s never yellow before then. That’s important for growers because they know exactly when to harvest their melons, it’s important for retailers because they know what fruit to display, and it’s important for consumers who know they’ll get fruit that is at its peak of flavor.

“We know that people want more flavor from melons,” said Guérin. “So we worked on ways to improve that.” In addition to a sweet taste and attractive appearance, having a sufficient shelf life was also key so the variety could be shipped from production area  to retail shelves without any hassle. That’s exactly what Nunhems got with Kirene.
 
Going forward, Guérin noted they’re working on extending this galia concept to come up with melons that can grow before and after Kirene’s window of June and July, but the reception the melon has received so far has been encouraging.

“The biggest production right now is in Spain, and the fruit is shipping throughout Europe,” said Guérin. “It’s now in the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and probably Russia.

For more information please visit www.nunhems.com
 

Publication date: 6/21/2013


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IPC poster helps operators with variety selection

Varieties-PosterVarieties-Poster 2014The state of Idaho produces more than 25 potato varieties, and the Idaho Potato Commission promotes them all. For operators who need help selecting just the right potato for their needs, the IPC has developed a “Our Most Popular Varieties” Web page with a link for a downloadable Idaho Potato Varieties poster to take the guesswork out of purchasing.

Visitors can click on each photo and description to find out more about the variety’s appearance, flavor profile and recommended usage. The printable poster is also suitable for display in prep areas or culinary education classrooms.

From the Russet Burbank to the Cal Red and Russian Banana Fingerling, Idaho produces a potato to meet every recipe requirement. For example, the Russet Burbank — with a distinctive, earthy flavor and high solids content — makes the ideal baking potato and is a popular variety for French fries, while many chefs chose the waxy, firm textured Cal Red to boil or steam for potato salad.

After purchasing Idaho potatoes, operators can visit foodservice.idahopotato.com to browse the IPC’s comprehensive recipe database, refer to a helpful size guide and Idaho potato preparation tips, and find answers and solutions to operational and culinary FAQs.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

IPC poster helps operators with variety selection

Varieties-PosterVarieties-Poster 2014The state of Idaho produces more than 25 potato varieties, and the Idaho Potato Commission promotes them all. For operators who need help selecting just the right potato for their needs, the IPC has developed a “Our Most Popular Varieties” Web page with a link for a downloadable Idaho Potato Varieties poster to take the guesswork out of purchasing.

Visitors can click on each photo and description to find out more about the variety’s appearance, flavor profile and recommended usage. The printable poster is also suitable for display in prep areas or culinary education classrooms.

From the Russet Burbank to the Cal Red and Russian Banana Fingerling, Idaho produces a potato to meet every recipe requirement. For example, the Russet Burbank — with a distinctive, earthy flavor and high solids content — makes the ideal baking potato and is a popular variety for French fries, while many chefs chose the waxy, firm textured Cal Red to boil or steam for potato salad.

After purchasing Idaho potatoes, operators can visit foodservice.idahopotato.com to browse the IPC’s comprehensive recipe database, refer to a helpful size guide and Idaho potato preparation tips, and find answers and solutions to operational and culinary FAQs.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Stellar Distributing has a Tiger by the tail with new fig variety

If last year’s inaugural marketing season is any indication, retailers will continue to pounce on opportunities to move Tiger figs to customers.StellarDistributing

The exclusive variety was added to the production manifest of Stellar Distributing Inc. several years ago, and Sales Manager Kurt Cappelluti said marketplace excitement would not diminish in 2014.

“We have a beautiful crop,” he told The Produce News in mid-April. “It’s our second good season.”

The trees have been maturing for the past five years, and Cappelluti said product quality is exceptional. Tiger Figs are eye-catching with their striped green and yellow skin and bright red flesh. Cappelluti said they also have a unique flavor, which distinguishes them from other figs.

The company is headquartered in Madera, CA, and boasts an extensive fig program. Varieties marketed include Sierra, Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Calimyrna and Kadota.

Brian Lapin, a salesman for Stellar, said production alternates several times each season between acreage in California’s southern desert and Madera, giving Stellar the opportunity to market figs eight months out of the year.

“Nature staggers [our growing seasons and locations] for us,” Lapin said. “We’re trying to get our fig program to be year-round.”

In addition to figs, Stellar also markets chestnuts, limes, apricots, pomegranates, persimmons and kiwi to its customers. As a company, Stellar is vertically integrated, working with an extensive network of growers and suppliers in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

Speaking of its overall fig program, Cappelluti said Stellar markets 3 million two-pound equivalents of figs annually. The 2014 fig season will kick off April 28 — two weeks earlier than it did last year. Sierra, Black Mission and Brown Turkey will be the first varieties out of the gate.

Because Stellar uses underground wells to irrigate figs, Cappelluti said there has been no impact to the crop associated with California’s ongoing drought.

“The way the crop is looking right now, we will have good amounts of figs,” Lapin added.

Lapin said last year’s Tiger fig volume was sold to retailers, and pricing was good. Looking forward, Lapin predicts that consumer interest in Tiger figs will continue to increase, and production will step up in the coming years in response.

He described consumer demand for figs this way: “Figs are crazy. They’re always in demand regardless of time of year.”

Stellar offers traditional packaging for figs and continues to innovate with a variety of clamshells. This season, Stellar will introduce 16 six-ounce and 32 six-ounce clams. Shaped to gently cradle individual figs, new nine-count 12-ounce and 12-count 22-ounce clams will also be available.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Stellar Distributing has a Tiger by the tail with new fig variety

If last year’s inaugural marketing season is any indication, retailers will continue to pounce on opportunities to move Tiger figs to customers.StellarDistributing

The exclusive variety was added to the production manifest of Stellar Distributing Inc. several years ago, and Sales Manager Kurt Cappelluti said marketplace excitement would not diminish in 2014.

“We have a beautiful crop,” he told The Produce News in mid-April. “It’s our second good season.”

The trees have been maturing for the past five years, and Cappelluti said product quality is exceptional. Tiger Figs are eye-catching with their striped green and yellow skin and bright red flesh. Cappelluti said they also have a unique flavor, which distinguishes them from other figs.

The company is headquartered in Madera, CA, and boasts an extensive fig program. Varieties marketed include Sierra, Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Calimyrna and Kadota.

Brian Lapin, a salesman for Stellar, said production alternates several times each season between acreage in California’s southern desert and Madera, giving Stellar the opportunity to market figs eight months out of the year.

“Nature staggers [our growing seasons and locations] for us,” Lapin said. “We’re trying to get our fig program to be year-round.”

In addition to figs, Stellar also markets chestnuts, limes, apricots, pomegranates, persimmons and kiwi to its customers. As a company, Stellar is vertically integrated, working with an extensive network of growers and suppliers in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

Speaking of its overall fig program, Cappelluti said Stellar markets 3 million two-pound equivalents of figs annually. The 2014 fig season will kick off April 28 — two weeks earlier than it did last year. Sierra, Black Mission and Brown Turkey will be the first varieties out of the gate.

Because Stellar uses underground wells to irrigate figs, Cappelluti said there has been no impact to the crop associated with California’s ongoing drought.

“The way the crop is looking right now, we will have good amounts of figs,” Lapin added.

Lapin said last year’s Tiger fig volume was sold to retailers, and pricing was good. Looking forward, Lapin predicts that consumer interest in Tiger figs will continue to increase, and production will step up in the coming years in response.

He described consumer demand for figs this way: “Figs are crazy. They’re always in demand regardless of time of year.”

Stellar offers traditional packaging for figs and continues to innovate with a variety of clamshells. This season, Stellar will introduce 16 six-ounce and 32 six-ounce clams. Shaped to gently cradle individual figs, new nine-count 12-ounce and 12-count 22-ounce clams will also be available.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

CMI releases apple variety performance report

Top-performing retailers generate up to three times more apple category dollars even after equalizing for store size, according to a new analysis released by CMI. The report assesses the key differences between top- and bottom-performing retailers in U.S. markets, identifying strategies used by leading supermarket chains to drive sales and volume growth.variety-performance-report

“We looked at three years of apple category performance data for retailers all over the U.S.,” Steve Lutz, vice president of marketing for CMI, said in a press release. “There are some fairly basic approaches used by top retailers to drive apple sales that the guys at the back of the pack miss. It appears that the specific tools consistently used by top supermarkets can be implemented by just about any retailer of any size, but are missed by low-performing supermarkets.”

Lutz said the study reveals how consumers follow retailer cues in making apple purchase decisions at the point of sale. “The research shows that when consumers reach the retail shelf they actively shop the category but ultimately purchase a single variety,” he said. “Regular apple buyers are very cognizant of retail price promotions, which can actually create incentives to trade-down from a regular planned purchase at full price to a discounted item, reducing dollar performance.”  

Lutz said the most successful retailers actually boost performance by strategically using variety selection, shelf position and merchandising to shift consumers away from low-priced varieties to higher-priced mainline and niche brands.

The study also shows that the most successful retail chains offer much more variety to consumers. “The data shows that the top-performing supermarkets carry an average of 40 unique apple SKUs every week, said Lutz. “That makes for a very dynamic category and allows retailers to mix the promotion and merchandising to drive sales. The low-performing chains averaged only 22 SKUs per week.”

The study results indicate that another key factor in driving apple category performance is how well the chain utilizes niche and branded apples. According to Lutz, the study shows retailers with the strongest apple category performance “maintain a larger assortment of niche and branded apples such as Ambrosia or Kiku, actively working to entice consumers to switch their purchases from lower priced segments into these more expensive but very flavorful apples.

“When you drill down on the store-specific data, it is very apparent that decisions made at the management level are influencing category sales success or even failure,” said Lutz. “One national chain had three banners in the bottom 10 nationally in apple performance primarily as a result of corporate directives in terms of assortment, pricing and promotion. With some fairly simple shifts, they could have an immediate positive impact on their apple sales performance.”

Lutz said that the report has been released and is being used now with CMI retail customers.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.