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What Are the Best Tomato Varieties?

Tomatoes are a favored food of lots of as well as are fantastic by themselves, in a salad, or accompanying any meal. Although practically a fruit, most people – consisting of cooks – categorize tomatoes as a vegetable. Tomatoes grow on a creeping plant that frequently reaches ten feet in size.

Benefits of Consuming Tomatoes

In the far-off past tomatoes were believed to be hazardous in nature and also a contributing consider the development of conditions such as cancer cells, brain fever, as well as appendicitis. Study, nevertheless, has shown proof on the contrary.

Tomatoes have actually been located to be rich in vitamin A, including 15% of the daily demand, and vitamin C, with some 40% of your everyday demand. These vitamins, likewise called antioxidants, are understood to combat off the results of free-radicals, recognized to cause cell damages in the body.

Tomatoes are a superb food for aiding in vision enhancement due to its high focus of vitamin A. Tomatoes additionally include a high amount of chromium which has actually been proven to be valuable in regulating your body’s blood sugar level degree. Therefore, diabetics will absolutely benefit from eating tomatoes.

The visibility of potassium as well as vitamin B aid to reduced high cholesterol levels as well as blood pressure. This will certainly aid in the prevention of cardiovascular disease as well as strokes.

Tomatoes likewise have high degrees of lycopene, which is a substance that behaves in a comparable way as an antioxidant, making it another free-radical fighter. Researches have actually shown that consuming regarding 1 1/2 servings of tomatoes weekly can bring about a decreased danger of prostate cancer cells growth.

Types of Tomatoes

There are lots of variations of tomatoes and each offers the benefits listed above as well as much more. Below are the five most common types of tomatoes.

World Tomatoes

These are your basic variant of tomatoes and are frequently referred to as Beefsteak tomatoes or Slicing tomatoes. They are easily identifiable since they are big, rounded, and also red. They could likewise weigh up to two pounds.

Cherry Tomatoes

These tomatoes belong to the Collection variation. Cherry tomatoes tend to be just about the exact same dimension as a cherry, however they are much sweeter and juicier than the bigger ranges, such as World tomatoes.

Antique Tomatoes

This selection is gaining in popularity with chef. This is because Heirloom tomatoes are available in a huge selection of shapes as well as shades. Their greatest failure is that they have the tendency to continue to be ripe for a really brief time period.

Roma Tomatoes

Likewise known as plum tomatoes, they are the least juicy of all tomatoes. Due to the fact that they are thick and also contain fewer seeds than other tomato variants, Roma tomatoes are a favored for pasta sauces.

Pear Tomatoes

Another member of the Cluster tomato variation, Pear tomatoes get their name from their shape, which appears like a pear. They are just the dimension of a Cherry tomato, however without the high juice degrees

What Sort of Tomato Should I Expand?

ROM North to South, and coast to coastline, tomatoes are continually the most popular veggie in American yards. However, for most garden enthusiasts, just any old tomato will not do.

Finest Tomatoes for Pots as well as Planters

Some like them red, some like them yellow, orange or even purple. Some choose tomatoes as little as a dime and also some want them as huge as a melon. Some like them juicy, some like them dense and pulpy. The good news is, there are mroe than 700 various tomato ranges in cultivation today. A lot of selections for everybody.

If you’re aiming to determine which tomato selections to expand, below’s what I consider:

  • disease resistance
  • development behavior
  • time to maturity
  • flavor as well as structure

Illness resistance is essential, since tomatoes are vulnerable to a variety of diseases that can deteriorate the plant and reduce yields. Consider the seed package or plant label to see if the selection has resistance to verticillium as well as fusarium wilt, 2 very common soil-borne illness that influence tomatoes. Resistance to these conditions is designated by a V or F after the selection name. If tomatoes in your area struggle with root-knot nematode (N), Cigarette Mosaic virus (T) or Alternaria (A), try to find resistance to these conditions too. Late affliction is a problem in many locations, so choose a selection that’s immune.

Development routine is necessary to think about due to the fact that to obtain a bumper tomato crop, you need to offer adequate area for the plant and also sufficient assistance. Tomato plants have either growth routines:

Determinate ranges expand to a certain elevation (typically 2 to 3 feet), established fruit, then concentrate on ripening that fruit.

Indeterminate selections maintain expanding taller and taller, establishing as well as ripening fruit till they’re killed by frost. These ranges need even more support (from cages and also risks) as well as extra a little bit a lot more attention from the garden enthusiast.

If you have a restricted amount of growing room– or will be growing tomatoes in a pot or a planter– you must most likely select a determinate variety. Determinate selections are also good for cold-climate garden enthusiasts who should gather their whole plant within a pair weeks. If you have a lot of room, favor to select your tomatoes over numerous months, as well as are prepared to supply tough support with risks, cages or ladders, choose an indeterminate range.

ost varieties of paste tomatoes are determinate. Since most of the fruit ripens within two or 3 weeks, I invest those couple weekends canning, making sauce for the freezer, and running the dehydrator. After that it’s over! Because these determinate plants just get about 2 feet high, they do fine with little or no assistance. I just make use of plastic or straw mulch to maintain the fruit off the ground.

A lot of cherry and beefsteak tomatoes are indeterminate. This suggests the plants get significant, yet it also implies they produce fruit constantly from very early July right to frost. See to it you have a tomato assistance and some tomato connections if you select and indeterminate selection.

Time to maturation is important if you have a brief growing period. Where I live, I need to gather my tomatoes by very early September, prior to the light fades as well as frost comes. So I try to find varieties that will start ripening fruit in less than 75 days. A number of the really big beefsteak selections call for 90 days to mature. Check the seed packet or plant label for days-to-harvest. Not sure when you normally obtain frost in loss? Utilize a zip-code look-up for frost days.

Fruit features are just what I appreciate most. I utilize tomatoes in salads, on sandwiches, and also simply to eat in restaurants of hand. I dry them, could them and also use them in fresh and frozen sauces. So I choose tomato ranges based upon how well they’re matched to these usages.

Ideal Kinds Of Tomatoes Verdict

Even if you do not have a lot of area, you can expand a crop of juicy tomatoes. The secret: select a variety that matches the sort of planter and also assistance you’ll be utilizing. With a growing number of options readily available every year, here’s our guide to choosing the best plant:

As a whole, it’s best to select determinate (bush) selections, which are extra compact. Indeterminate kinds can get quite tall– as much as 10′ or a lot more! Nonetheless, there are also much shorter indeterminate varieties so check plant tags for fully grown heights.

  • Take into consideration ranges that have “patio area,” “dwarf” or “mini” in the name, which means the plant is probably portable.
  • Choose a range with a mature height that is equal to or much less compared to the height of the cage or other assistance you’ll be using.
  • Our Garden enthusiast’s Change ® planters have integrated supports; you could add an extension to enhance the elevation of the assistance so you can expand taller varieties.
  • For the widest series of option, start from seed. The Dwarf Tomato Task uses dozens of options, identified by gardeners from around the globe.
  • Small-fruited varieties don’t always expand on portable plants. Some cherry tomato plants could end up being substantial; others are smaller sized in stature. Check the plant tag initially.
  • Obtain garden-tested recommendations. Deborah in our examination yard recommends Shrub 506, a small hybrid that develops early. Extra excellent choices are listed here.
  • Ask long time garden enthusiasts in your community for their faves. The most effective advice frequently encounters the fence.
  • Consider trimming the vines, which can increase performance and also minimize bulk.

When you have the right plant, see to it you use potting soil that’s made for pots and also planters. Do not make use of regular garden dirt, which does not drain well when utilized in containers. Choose a tomato support that will suit the growth of your plant. In high winds, a mature plant could act like a sail. Discover a method to secure the planter so it’s protected.

Innovate today for tomorrow’s success

Foodservice operators are increasingly thinking “innovation first” as they move to capture market share and deliver exciting culinary options that appeal to today’s marketplace and consumers.

This year, the Produce Marketing Association’s Foodservice Conference & Expo will give attendees an opportunity to hone their skills, discover strategies that have direct real-time impact on delivery, close gaps and build important relationships for the future.ConventionOV4Consumers are increasingly becoming experimental in their own kitchens as they learn more about meal preparation and flavor handling through cooking shows and magazines. Photo courtesy of the Produce Marketing Association.

The conference is being held in stunning Monterey, CA, at the Hyatt Regency Monterey Hotel & Spa, July 29-31. Last year, the conference saw 1,870 attendees, including more than 200 operators and over 480 distributors/wholesalers at the convention’s intimate atmosphere.

The 2016 conference promises to deliver new insights and help solidify relationships between the foodservice sector and the fresh produce industry.

Attendees will have a chance to take advantage of some social pre-convention activities sponsored by the Center for Growing Talent by PMA. These include the Talent Tournament and Joe Nucci Memorial Golf Tournament. Activity kicks into high gear on July 29 with the 5K Race for Talent, designed to get the juices flowing.

This year’s educational sessions have been designed to focus on foodservice trends. “Hands-On Fruit & Vegetable Training” will provide attendees with some of the latest menu trends, as well as tips on care, handling and usage of fresh fruit and vegetables items that can help restaurants “innovate the plate” with global flavors.

The emcee for this session is Jill Overdorf, corporate executive chef and director of business development, Coosemans LA Shipping.

Attendees should prepare for a full day of intensive activity on Saturday, July 30 with four sessions available.

The session, “Turning Your Customers Into Advocates” will be presented by Professor Jonah Berger of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Find out why the marketing landscape is changing and discover strategies that companies can use to solidify consumer relationships.

Tim York, chief executive officer of Markon Cooperative Inc., will moderate a discussion on “Food Safety: Positioning Yourself as a Trusted Source.”

During this session, you’ll learn about the latest best practices in food safety and gain real-world strategies for sharing information with consumers while positioning your company as a source for high-quality fresh produce. You’ll learn how to communicate effectively with buyers and consumers, using the right channels and the right information, to build a trusted brand. Session speakers are Bob Whitaker, chief science & technology officer, Produce Marketing Association; Lance Donny, chief executive officer of On Farm; Robert Stovicek, president of Primus Labs; and Chef Kyong Carroll, executive chef, Bon [email protected]

The world of flavor explosion will be discussed at “Fascinating Flavors: Enticing Customers with Tastes and Trends.” Consumers are increasingly exploring new and exciting flavor options as they dine out and are becoming more experimental in their own kitchens as they interact with the world of cooking shows and magazines. Session speakers are Patty Johnson, global food and drink analyst; Mintel Carol Christensen, director of institutional advancement, Monell; and Chef Tony Baker, Montrio Bistro.

And finally, attendees will learn what will be hot when it comes to the rising stars of fresh produce. The session, “Menus of Change: From Seed to Stalk” will discuss factors influencing fine and casual dining, and trends consumers are taking advantage of today. This session, presented by Celebrity Chef Richard Blais of Juniper and Ivy, is designed to be both fun and educational.

PMA will host its Women’s Fresh Perspectives Reception the evening of July 30.

The convention will wrap up on July 31 with a number of activities including the Foodservice Produce Expo.

Networking opportunities will be available throughout the course of the conference.

For further information, visit http://www.pma.com/events/foodservice.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

NZ: KVH looks at new “Far North” exclusion zone Psa protection

The board of Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has said it will consider a proposal for a new “Far North” exclusion region that could potentially form part of its National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP).

In a release last Thursday, KVH said it would discuss the matter this week.

“This proposal was requested by an industry body operating in the far north area and follows consultation with local interested parties,” the group said in a release.

“The proposed new region would extend from Ahipara on the West coast across to Taipa in on the East coast and up to Cape Reinga.”

The proposal looks to establish a high level of protection for new commercial growing areas where new commercial orchards are starting to be established, as well as for other areas of importance to the industry such as sites that supply plant material that is free of the disease Psa.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

Chile pepper grower seeks support for improved grades and standards for category

A Florida-based grower-shipper of chile peppers is lobbying the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Specialty Crop Division to establish a USDA Grade and Delivery standard for the category, positing that it will benefit the industry at large.IMG 3585

Steve Veneziano, vice president of sales and operations for Oakes Farms, based in Immokalee, FL, said the company grades its own chile peppers as everyone else does Bell peppers, with grades of Fancy, No. 1 and No. 2 quality. He believes that if all shippers followed similar guidelines, the chile pepper category would benefit.

“With no grade contract established, the chile pepper category is fairly stagnant because they don’t have the proper sell-through, they have a lot of shrink, and produce managers don’t want to merchandise them because it’s a high-shrink category,” he said. “And especially during transitional times, some shippers mix No. 2s and poor-quality peppers in the box and they get away with it. Having a grade contract would eliminate that and help the entire industry. The chile pepper category has evolved tremendously over the past five years, and this is what it needs to continue moving forward.”

Veneziano said he recently contacted Jeffrey Davis, business development specialist with the USDA’s specialty crop program, who confirmed that grades and standards currently exist only for sweet peppers, and was told he would need to drum up support from the industry to move forward with his petition.

John Guerra, head of Eastern vegetable sales for S. Katzman Produce in the Bronx, NY, said he is in “100 percent in support of the petition.”

Guerra said the lack of quality standards for various hot peppers has really affected what the consumer thinks a hot pepper or varietal pepper should look like because there is very little restriction.

“Particularly from a terminal market point of view, on a tightly allocated market, everything goes into a box without any consideration on quality or grading, and you pass this along to a consumer who is expecting a certain quality, and it is frustrating,” said Guerra. “We went through a winter of some very unusual weather patterns in Florida, which created some limited availability. While many other grower-shippers were putting anything and everything into a box, Steve was separating them and giving us differentiated product. I feel very lucky that we had Oakes in our portfolio. It’s all about integrity, and Oakes is upholding something that isn’t being followed by all of the industry.”

Guerra said he would be interested in petitioning USDA in support of this movement.

Alan Goldberg, owner of A&B Tropical Produce in Miami, is another proponent of the concept, stating it is “long overdue” to have grading standards for the chile pepper industry.

“When issues come up, there needs to be something solid that people can rely on,” said Goldberg. “The chile pepper category is a growing category and the industry needs this. Really, every item should have a grade standard.”

Asked what benefit the grading standards would bring to the chile pepper industry, Goldberg said, “I think it will create confidence all across the board with both buyers and sellers, who will feel better that there is some protection down the line when it comes to settling disputes. It will limit the grey area. To me, anyone not in favor of implementing grade standards is unscrupulous. Why wouldn’t you want law and order?”

Goldberg said that he, too, is planning to contact USDA in support of this initiative. “I’ll do whatever I can to help promote this situation,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Could “Comic Contracts” help protect vulnerable workers?

South African group Indigo Fruit Growers thinks they can.

The company, which produces, packs and supplies ClemenGold mandarins to local and international markets, developed the concept in a bid to make contracts easier to understand for farmworkers.

The registered idea Comic Contracts was originally put forward by Robert de Rooy, a South African lawyer based in Cape Town and legal counsel for ClemenGold for many years. Comic Contract

The concept uses visualization to improve the understanding of contractual terms: the parties are represented by characters and illustrations are used to explain the terms of the contract.

The company said the contracts challenge the “taken-for-granted assumption” that only text can capture the terms of a contract”, by using mainly pictures instead of words for a binding agreement.

“It is based on the fact that pictures are easier to understand and easier to remember. The purpose of a Comic Contract is to empower the parties to understand each other, to understand what they expect from each other, and what they are committing to,” de Rooy said in a release.

Indigo Fruit Growers said the contracts were especially designed to address the needs of vulnerable employees: employees who either cannot read well or have difficulties understanding the language in which the contract is written.

Whilst the legal system requires that all employees have an employment contract, it assumes that everyone can read proficiently and understand the contractual terms presented to them.

However, the company claimed this was rarely the case in South Africa, especially in sectors employing low-skill workers such as agriculture, mining, manufacturing and domestic work.

“The way in which most contracts are drafted and presented (‘this is standard, sign it or leave it’) does not support a good relationship. Most employees don’t read it, nor would they be able to understand it if they tried,” de Rooy said, adding the situation perpetuated the power imbalance between employers and employees.

The release said under these circumstances employees were bound to terms which they don’t understand, couldn’t live up to, and could not use to hold their employers accountable, which meant misunderstanding and conflict in the workplace should come as no surprise.

“We are really excited about the transparency this contract brings to our employee relations,” said ANB Investments CEO Abs van Rooyen, whose company owns Indigo.

“It creates a more equitable situation, which can only be the start of a more ‘honest’ relationship with our employees. I believe that workers can only commit fully to the content of a contract if they understand what they are signing.”

Indigo recently initiated the implementation of the Comic Contracts, which were first presented to 50 fruit pickers who had previously worked for Indigo. Indigo. Following the successful induction of these 50 workers, the contract was presented the next day to a further 163 fruit-pickers.

“The feedback was positive. No picker asked for the old contract,” said farm manager Faan Kruger.

“Although everything was new and there were many questions, the process went much faster than with a traditional contract.”

www.freshfruitportal.com

 

 

FreshFruitPortal.com

Second wave of California figs brings more volume

The California fig season started strong with great sizing and quality. While bigger sizing brought optimism to retailers looking for a premium at checkout, a lack of volume kept figs from being promotable.

The second season is also sizing well with the bonus of more volume, according to Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager for Stellar Distributing, based in Madera, CA.KurtKurt Cappelluti

“It could be the best one we’ve ever had as far as growth and production on our 300 plus acres of young trees,” Cappelluti said. “That means we’ll have figs as late as anyone. The young trees will give us a ton of production, which was missing during the first season, and sizing looks to be better. That’s good news for retailers looking to satisfy fig fans.”

Regular rain through California’s 2016 spring season benefitted the young fig trees, according to Cappelluti. After several years of severe drought, routine rain pushed growth on the young trees and is now pushing good volume.

“This year’s quality will be as good as our 2015 season and the great volume will give us strong supply into November,” he added. “It’s exciting when nature and our plans come together for a season like this. The people who love figs will love the 2016 season.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Produce industry praises Senate for immigration vote, urges House to act

WASHINGTON—The agricultural industry wasted no time hailing the Senate for passing, by a 68-32 vote, an immigration reform bill on June 27, but the focus quickly shifts to the House and a July 10 meeting where the House Republican leadership will carve out next steps for immigration reform.

The “Gang of Eight” Senators spearheaded this bill, and Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) worked behind the scenes to forge an agreement between the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and the United Farm Workers on the agricultural provisions that producers and farm workers could live with.

For the produce industry, immigration reform has been a number one issue for years and the Senate vote was nothing short of historic.

“This bill will ease the burden on agricultural employers, create more jobs along the entire supply chain and boost the economy,” said Tom Stenzel, chief executive officer of the United Fresh Produce Association. “We appreciate the efforts of our allies in the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and United Farm Workers with whom we worked to advance provisions that will provide a legal and stable workforce for fruit and vegetable growers.”

“The hardworking farmers, farm workers and workers from every affected industry deserve a new immigration system from its elected representatives,” said Western Growers CEO and President Tom Nassif, who thanked lawmakers for their leadership in approving S. 744.

United Farm Workers said the bill “fulfills the urgent need for an earned legalization program that enables undocumented farm workers who are the backbone of the nation’s agricultural industry to swiftly obtain legal immigration satus,” as well as stablize the farm labor workforce by providing incentives for workers to continue jobs in agriculture.

All eyes turn to the House, which is scheduled for a weeklong break in their districts before returning to Capitol Hill for a much-anticipated July 10 meeting with House Republican leadership on the best ways to tackle immigration reform legislation. Chances of considering the Senate-passed bill in the House are slim.

“The Senate’s passage was remarkable in a lot of ways, but it’s just the next step in a journey,” said Mike Stuart, president of the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association. The House needs 218 votes to pass a bill that can go into conference and work out differences on the agricultural provisions, he said.

“We need to get to conference or we won’t have any bill,” Stuart added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Produce industry praises Senate for immigration vote, urges House to act

WASHINGTON—The agricultural industry wasted no time hailing the Senate for passing, by a 68-32 vote, an immigration reform bill on June 27, but the focus quickly shifts to the House and a July 10 meeting where the House Republican leadership will carve out next steps for immigration reform.

The “Gang of Eight” Senators spearheaded this bill, and Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) worked behind the scenes to forge an agreement between the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and the United Farm Workers on the agricultural provisions that producers and farm workers could live with.

For the produce industry, immigration reform has been a number one issue for years and the Senate vote was nothing short of historic.

“This bill will ease the burden on agricultural employers, create more jobs along the entire supply chain and boost the economy,” said Tom Stenzel, chief executive officer of the United Fresh Produce Association. “We appreciate the efforts of our allies in the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and United Farm Workers with whom we worked to advance provisions that will provide a legal and stable workforce for fruit and vegetable growers.”

“The hardworking farmers, farm workers and workers from every affected industry deserve a new immigration system from its elected representatives,” said Western Growers CEO and President Tom Nassif, who thanked lawmakers for their leadership in approving S. 744.

United Farm Workers said the bill “fulfills the urgent need for an earned legalization program that enables undocumented farm workers who are the backbone of the nation’s agricultural industry to swiftly obtain legal immigration satus,” as well as stablize the farm labor workforce by providing incentives for workers to continue jobs in agriculture.

All eyes turn to the House, which is scheduled for a weeklong break in their districts before returning to Capitol Hill for a much-anticipated July 10 meeting with House Republican leadership on the best ways to tackle immigration reform legislation. Chances of considering the Senate-passed bill in the House are slim.

“The Senate’s passage was remarkable in a lot of ways, but it’s just the next step in a journey,” said Mike Stuart, president of the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association. The House needs 218 votes to pass a bill that can go into conference and work out differences on the agricultural provisions, he said.

“We need to get to conference or we won’t have any bill,” Stuart added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Produce industry praises Senate for immigration vote, urges House to act

WASHINGTON—The agricultural industry wasted no time hailing the Senate for passing, by a 68-32 vote, an immigration reform bill on June 27, but the focus quickly shifts to the House and a July 10 meeting where the House Republican leadership will carve out next steps for immigration reform.

The “Gang of Eight” Senators spearheaded this bill, and Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) worked behind the scenes to forge an agreement between the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and the United Farm Workers on the agricultural provisions that producers and farm workers could live with.

For the produce industry, immigration reform has been a number one issue for years and the Senate vote was nothing short of historic.

“This bill will ease the burden on agricultural employers, create more jobs along the entire supply chain and boost the economy,” said Tom Stenzel, chief executive officer of the United Fresh Produce Association. “We appreciate the efforts of our allies in the Agriculture Workforce Coalition and United Farm Workers with whom we worked to advance provisions that will provide a legal and stable workforce for fruit and vegetable growers.”

“The hardworking farmers, farm workers and workers from every affected industry deserve a new immigration system from its elected representatives,” said Western Growers CEO and President Tom Nassif, who thanked lawmakers for their leadership in approving S. 744.

United Farm Workers said the bill “fulfills the urgent need for an earned legalization program that enables undocumented farm workers who are the backbone of the nation’s agricultural industry to swiftly obtain legal immigration satus,” as well as stablize the farm labor workforce by providing incentives for workers to continue jobs in agriculture.

All eyes turn to the House, which is scheduled for a weeklong break in their districts before returning to Capitol Hill for a much-anticipated July 10 meeting with House Republican leadership on the best ways to tackle immigration reform legislation. Chances of considering the Senate-passed bill in the House are slim.

“The Senate’s passage was remarkable in a lot of ways, but it’s just the next step in a journey,” said Mike Stuart, president of the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association. The House needs 218 votes to pass a bill that can go into conference and work out differences on the agricultural provisions, he said.

“We need to get to conference or we won’t have any bill,” Stuart added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Peruvian grape production continues to climb

Peruvian grape production continues to climb

Despite exporting virtually no grapes as recently as 13 years ago, Peruvian grape exports were worth $ 365 million last year. That rapid growth has been driven by increasing production by the nation’s growers.

Although, according to a report by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service, the cost of planting new vineyards remains high, good prices and good returns on investment keep growers planting more acreage. That’s contributed to strong growth in production, with an estimated 305,000 MT for the current year. Of that production, it’s estimated 150,000 MT will be exported.

The primary markets for Peruvian grapes are the Netherlands and the US. Last year, 27,516 MT were shipped to the Netherlands and 25,420 MT were shipped to the US. The value of grape exports last year was estimated at $ 365 million.

Publication date: 6/28/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Pink Lady celebrates 21 years in the UK

Pink Lady celebrates 21 years in the UK

Pink Lady® is marking its 21st year in the UK with a large scale consumer promotion taking place this summer. An on-pack giveaway of 21 prizes over 21 days will be promoted on all bags and tray packs and in most major retailers[1] from 1st July with a prize a day being given away from 12th July – 1st August.  

The promotion will involve Pink Lady® giving away its ‘Birthday Wish List’ of prizes including:

  • A weekend for two in New York (the Big Apple!)
  • Orient express experience for two
  • A week-long family holiday in Tuscany
  • An overnight stay in London with tickets to a West End Show
  • A personal shopping experience in Selfridges

The 21st prize will be selected by the brand’s fans on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Print advertising titles such as Marie Claire, BBC Good Food, Tesco and Sainsbury’s Magazine will run alongside online activity, including a Mumsnet sponsored discussion and Yahoo takeover. The brand’s social channels – Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest – will be employed to boost direct consumer engagement and to promote the winners. In-store support includes radio and shelf barkers in Morrisons and shelf barkers in Waitrose.

Michelle Toft, Marketing Manager for Pink Lady® in the UK comments:

“We are really excited about this promotion. Our 21st birthday is a perfect opportunity to celebrate the success of the Pink Lady® brand with our customers and, of course, to further boost awareness and sales. We’ve been delighted by the support we’ve had from our retail customers across the board, which will help to ensure the promotion is as successful as it can be.”

The first shipment of 500 boxes of Pink Lady® apples were introduced to the UK market in 1992. With over 3.5 million boxes now sold every year, the UK has become one of the most important and successful markets for the Pink Lady® brand globally.

Andy Macdonald, Managing Director of Coregeo Ltd, Master Licensor for Pink Lady® in the UK, comments:

“Since entering the UK market in 1992, Pink Lady® has enjoyed impressive success, having carved out a market share of 11% – making the apple one of the top 3 by value in the UK.”

“We’re particularly proud of the sales gains and household penetration increase we have made during the challenging economic conditions of the last couple of years, during which time sales and penetration of other apples have been falling.”

“Our commitment to a high quality product, alongside a proactive marketing campaign, has been fundamental to the success of the brand, and we look forward to celebrating this success with our consumers through this promotion.”

Promotional packs of Pink Lady® apples – each containing a unique code – go on sale in Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, Waitrose, Co-op, Aldi, Asda, Ocado, Costco, Booths and Budgens from 1st July. Entry will be via a dedicated microsite on the Pink Lady® apples website at www.pinkladyapples.co.uk/21.

 

Publication date: 6/28/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

Mexican mangos to US ahead of last year’s shipments

About halfway through the window during which Mexican growers export mangos to the US, the rate at which mangos have arrived in the US is ahead of last year’s pace.

The National Mango Board projects that total shipments of Mexican mangos into the US will reach 42.1 million boxes this season. Shipments for the season reached 35.6 million boxes during the week ending on June 15, and that’s about three million more boxes than were shipped at the same time last year. Last season’s shipments from Mexico were at 35.7 million boxes for mid-June last year. The week ending June 15, 2013 saw Mexican growers ship 3.3 million boxes of mangos into the US, which means this is when shippers approach peak volumes for the season.

The most popular varieties this season have been the Tommy Atkins and Ataulfo, with those two varieties representing almost 70 percent of the mangos coming into the US from Mexico.

Publication date: 6/28/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Letter From the Editor: No Celebrity Chefs, Please

Before turning back east, I stopped off in Seattle for 25 years during a period when the Emerald City seemed closer to Tokyo than New York. I remember learning from two Asahi Shimbun newspaper reporters of a TV show sweeping up in Japan called “Iron Chef.”

It would probably be another year before it was picked up on the Food Network on cable TV in Seattle so I could see “Iron Chef” for myself. It turned out to be the best group-watching since “Dallas.” Who can forget Chairman Kaga shouting out, “Allez cuisine!” (“Go cook!”) to get it all going in “Kitchen Stadium”? And, which “Iron Chef” would be up that night?

For a short time, it was all great fun. And, just as Larry Hagman, who played J.R. Ewing on “Dallas” was one of those “all hat, no cattle” type of guys, so, too, was Takeshi Kaga, who played Chairman Kaga of “Iron Chef” fame. Before “Iron Chef,” he was already a well-known stage and movie actor in Japan, but he was not at all associated with cooking.

As the host, he had a corral of “Iron Chefs” who were the genuine talents, along with those brought into compete with them during any of the 92 episodes. Nevertheless, with all the lights and smoke, it was a really big show. It was ground-breaking in raising awareness about chefs in a way those more static cooking shows never did.

I’ve not seen “Top Chef,” which has been running for a decade or so on Bravo. It also features a competitive format but moves to a different location each season. It has apparently outdistanced the original “Iron Chef.” Meanwhile, the Food Channel has revived the Japanese program with “Iron Chef America.”

With food being both a segment topic for some networks and the complete package for others such as The Cooking Channel and the Food Network, the “celebrity chef” has become a fully developed phenomenon in popular politics and culture.

I could not care less about what they have to say. Beyond saying, “Thank you very much,” I think celebrities should be seen, but not heard. Act, or sing, or cook. Show me what you are known for and be gracious about it, but spare me your opinions about most anything.

Adding celebrity status to someone wearing a chef’s white hat also does not do much for me. Maybe if there were a long line of chefs, or even one or two, who have been known as food-safety leaders, I would think about it differently. But I cannot name one.

I know many chefs earn the title through extensive academic training and on-the-job experience. Also, I know others get the title from their brother-in-law, who owns the restaurant chain.

In preparing to write this, I’ve watched a number of interviews of celebrity chefs, and they share a common danger sign. I’ve not seen one that included a tough, or even unexpected, question. I’ve seen people asking the questions whose main concern is their access to the “celebrities.”

So spare me your press releases about what some celebrity chef thinks about this or that. Some chefs do entertain, and some chefs do know how to cook. Just do whatever you do in the kitchen, and we’ll have no problems.

Unless, of course, the health department shuts you down for unsanitary practices. Then we will be interested in what you have to say.

Food Safety News

Retailers, producers gear up for Year of the Goat

Retailers can be assured that produce departments will be well stocked with fresh Asian items during Chinese New Year. The Year of the Goat officially begins on Feb. 19.

Patsy Ross, marketing director for Christopher Ranch LLC, said the Gilroy, CA-based company offers a variety of products to add flavor to any meal. “We handle fresh ginger year-round,” she told The Produce News. “We also have some processed ginger items, chopped ginger and garlic ginger stir fry.”

At the current time, Christopher Ranch is transitioning from South American-grown ginger to its Hawaiian ginger crop.Asian3Lakeside Organic Gardens grows Asian vegetables in California’s Imperial Valley. The company plants sweet alyssum to attract beneficial insects such as hover flies which eat aphid larvae. Seen here is a cabbage field in which this pest control practice is used. (Photo courtesy of Lakeside Organic Gardens) “The Hawaiian ginger season normally runs from December through June,” she said. “The Hawaiian ginger is grown in the Hilo, Hawaii, area. We have worked with ginger growers in Hawaii for over 25 years.”

Trends at the consumer level have been favorable for Asian produce. “Interest in Asian cuisine has moved from every town in America having a Chinese food restaurant to Japanese, Thai, Korean and Vietnamese foods both in restaurants and in grocery stores,” she commented. “Ginger is an important flavor profile in all types of Asian cuisine.”

Jim Provost, owner of I Love Produce in Kelton, PA, agreed. “Ginger is really growing in demand for its flavor and health benefits,” he stated. “Peru has become a major player in the world ginger market, and I Love Produce has helped significantly contribute to that growth. After China, Peru exported more ginger to the United States in 2014 than any other country. The quality of Peru ginger is the best in the world in terms of skin condition and flavor, and they have an excellent crop this year.”

I Love Produce also moves a variety of Asian pears, including Gingo, Golden and Ya, from China. “Asian pears are also growing in popularity,” he said, adding that the company is packaging Asian pears under the “Eat Brighter!” campaign. “We are the only company using Eat Brighter! to help sell Chinese pears,” he went on to say. “Kids love the juicy sweet flavor of Asian pears, so the Eat Brighter! campaign is a great way to promote this product to both children and their parents.”

The company also markets oriental sweet potatoes.

Lindsey Roberts, who handles marketing communications for Lakeside Organic Gardens, said the company grows organic Asian produce on 800 acres in California’s Imperial Valley. “Volume is on par, and quality looks great,” she told The Produce News. “As kimchi and other fermented foods grow in popularity, so does the demand for Napa cabbage. We supply many organic fermented food producers with bok choy, green cabbage, carrots and Napa cabbage. Carrots complement Asian cooking very nicely as well.”

The Santa Cruz, CA-based company helps consumers incorporate Asian produce into menu planning and preparation. “On our social media platforms, we encourage people to learn about all the vegetables we grow and give easy ideas to incorporate vegetables into everyday menus,” Roberts noted. “The Asian items are popular in stir frys and soups. In January, we will share our rendition of a delicious California cole slaw recipe.”

Paul Boris, co-owner and vice president of Agritrade Farms LLC in Deerfield Beach, FL, said the company specializes in okra branded under the “Gumbo-Licious” label. Okra accounts for approximately roughly 50 percent of Agritrade’s total sales, and 40 percent of okra is marketed in Europe. “Okra is extremely healthy and is experiencing tremendous growth among Americans and Europeans as they become more concerned about eating healthy,” Boris commented.

Agritrade imports Asian vegetables from the Dominican Republic and Honduras. The line includes items such as banana flower, Chinese bitter melon, Chinese eggplant, curry leaves, green long beans, Thai eggplant and tindora.

“There are approximately 18 million Asians and Asian Americans living in the U.S. representing about 5 percent of the population,” Boris stated. “Major cities with Asian demographics include New York, Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. There are approximately 5 million Asians and Asian Canadians living in Canada representing approximately 15 percent of the population. Major cities with significant Asian populations include Toronto and Vancouver.”

Boris said Asian vegetables are becoming more popular with American consumers. “Many Americans are first introduced to the flavors of Asian vegetables in restaurants,” he observed. “Look at the American growth of guacamole, salsa and others via the American growing Hispanic demographics. Asian vegetables are experiencing similar growth on a smaller scale with new American customers enjoying the great taste of Asian cooking.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

DOJ Food-Safety Enforcement Role to Continue in 2015

When producers of such staple foods as beef, eggs, and peanut butter found they were the targets of federal criminal prosecution, it became a top food-safety story of 2014. But is it likely that food-safety enforcement will continue to rely on these U.S. Department of Justice-led (DOJ) criminal cases in 2015?

You can bet on it. Not only is it going to take 2015 and maybe beyond for the courts to fully adjudicate the cases that are underway, it’s likely we will see a new case or two involving criminal charges filed in the new year.

One additional possible criminal case we know about — and usually DOJ can prevent disclosure about a case until charges are actually filed — involves the 2006-07 Salmonella Tennessee outbreak caused by contaminated Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butters.

We know something might be stirring in that case because DOJ began contacting outbreak victims under the Crime Victims Rights Act last August, and also because Omaha, NE-based ConAgra Foods Inc. disclosed in its 10-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that a federal criminal misdemeanor stemming from the eight-year-old tainted peanut-butter incident remains possible.

The peanut-butter brands were produced by the $ 17.7-billion food conglomerate at a plant in Sylvester, GA. That Salmonella Tennessee outbreak, which ran from Aug. 1, 2006, to Feb. 16, 2007, sickened 425 people in 44 states. About one in five of them required hospital care, but none died.

When tainted peanut butter turned out to be the source of another Salmonella outbreak originating in Georgia, the manufacturer would not be so lucky. Nine deaths were attributed to the outbreak strain out of about 750 confirmed cases in that 2008-09 outbreak.

About 100 days have passed since a jury in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia found Peanut Corporation of America executives guilty of nearly 100 criminal charges. Post-trial action has included motions for directed verdicts of not guilty, or, as an alternative, motions for new trials.

For reasons not entirely clear or known, evidentiary hearings have been held in secret, and numerous motions made in the past 14 weeks were sealed by the judge. One possible reason for the post-trial secrecy could be defense attorney concerns that some jurors may have used the Internet to do their own research on PCA’s history during the course of the trial.

Stewart Parnell, who owned PCA; Michael Parnell, his peanut-broker broker, and Mary Wilkerson, the quality-assurance manager at Blakely, GA, were found guilty in mid-September and have been awaiting sentencing ever since, along with two other former PCA managers who pleaded guilty before the trial in a plea agreement with the prosecution.

K. Alan Dasher, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, has asked to have until Friday, Jan. 2, to respond to defense motions, some filed jointly, for a new trial. Meanwhile, defense attorney Thomas G. Ledford, who represents Wilkerson, wants to introduce yet another sealed motion.

Court documents apparently do not yet include filings of Pre-Sentence Investigative Reports (PSIRs) or dates for sentencing.

An ending may be closer for 71-year-old Austin “Jack” DeCoster, his 51-year-old son, Peter DeCoster, and their Quality Egg LLC, a family trust. The sentencing hearing for the trio will begin Feb. 9 in U.S. District Court for Northern Iowa in Sioux City.

Whether there should be any kind of jail or detention, even home detention, is the major issue separating government and defense attorneys. The father and son have each pleaded guilty to individual misdemeanors and agreed to pay fines of $ 100,000 each. Quality Egg LLC pleaded guilty to bribing a federal egg inspection and agreed to pay a $ 7.8-million fine.

The government is contacting victims of the 2010 Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak about the February sentencing event.

What could be the most-watched food-safety trial of 2015 begins with jury selection on July 16 in San Francisco. Former Rancho Feeding Corporation co-owner Jesse J. (Babe) Amaral Jr., 76, will be tried alone, as other defendants in the federal criminal conspiracy case have reached plea deals with the government on charges that they conspired to sell cattle known to have eye cancers and other problems for human consumption.

Others charged in the case will likely appear at the trial, but probably as government witnesses. They are Felix Sandoval Cabrera, 55, who was the foreman of Rancho’s slaughterhouse at Petaluma, CA; Eugene D. Corda, the 65-year-old former Rancho yardman, and 77-year-old Robert Singleton, who was Rancho’s other co-owner.

Those three have entered guilty pleas to one misdemeanor count each involving the illegal distribution of adulterated, misbranded and uninspected meat.

Two other trials are scheduled in Iowa’s Halal beef cases. The Cedar Rapids-based Miramar Corporation, Islamic Services of America (ISA), and brothers Jalel Farris Aossey and Yahya Nasser Aossey are scheduled for trial on Feb. 17.

The two men are the sons of Miramar and ISA founder William B. Aossey Jr., who is scheduled for a separate trial on March 9. Both trials will take place in U.S. District Court for Northern Iowa in Cedar Rapids.

Charges of conspiracy, forgery, wire fraud, and money-laundering all stem from alleged misrepresentation of Halal beef shipments to south Asia. While the charges are not strictly food-safety related, they do involve mislabeling and violations of statutes that are usually seen as essential to food-safety enforcement.

Halal meats are prepared according to specific standards of the Muslim faith, including those for slaughter.

Food Safety News

Subway Investigating Reports of Doctored Expiration Dates in China

Chinese media are reporting that workers at a Subway sub-sandwich fast-food chain outlet in Beijing were doctoring expiration labels and serving meat and vegetables beyond their expiration date. Subway officials stated on Monday that they were investigating the claims, according to Reuters.

Subway is just the latest in a recent string of fast-food chains with alleged problems related to expired food in China. In July, a Chinese TV report exposed the same practice apparently occurring at Chinese McDonald’s and KFC outlets.

That scandal traced back to a subsidiary of U.S. food supplier OSI Group. McDonald’s made a high-profile decision to cut ties with the company for its Chinese operations. Ultimately, six employees of the subsidiary were arrested for their alleged involvement in mixing outdated meat with fresher supplies.

The subsidiary, Shanghai Husi Food Co., also supplied food to Chinese franchises of other big-name chains, including Pizza Hut, Starbucks, Burger King and 7-Eleven.

Subway would not confirm or deny the reports on Monday, stating that the company needed more time to investigate the claims. Regulators in Beijing have also launched an investigation.

Food Safety News

Retailers have opportunity in ‘sharing economy,’ analyst says

The rise of the so-called “sharing economy” led by the Uber car service app will challenge retailers to respond to customers increasingly demanding similar convenience and delivery speed for all things they consume, according to a new report from analyst Deborah Weinswig of Fung Business Intelligence Center (FBIC).

“Inspired by Uber’s business model and the concept of sharing and an on-demand economy, start-ups are increasingly seeking to ‘Uberfy’ the world with convenient mobile services that match demand with supply conveniently via software,” Weiswig wrote. “From laundry and medical marijuana to in-home massage and the outsoyrcing of errands, there is an app that will get it for you with just one click.

“Those who have experienced these services are going to demand faster turnaround times on everything at the convenience levels they have become accustomed to,” she added. “This new consumer mindset challenges retailers to be more responsive.”

The FBIC report cited startups in dozens of categories that, like Uber, utilize mobile apps aligning supply and demand and facilitate payment allowing for convenient execution of services ranging from babysitting (Urban Sitter) to medical needs (Pager, Medicast) to private jets (Blackjet).


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Launched in San Francisco in 2009, Uber is now available in 200 cities worldwide and has a current market valuation of $ 40 billion, Weinswig noted. Leveraging its drivers has allowed the company to diversify into experimental delivery-on-demand services including UberFRESH, a lunch delivery option now available in certain California markets and Uber Corner Store, which enables delivery of convenience items now testing in the Washington, D.C. area.

Some traditional retailers are already responding to to the on-demand economy with similar services, the report said, citing the British shirt retailer Pink, which has introduced a new app enabling home or office delivery of a shirt within 90 minutes of an order.

The success of Uber and pricing that varies by demand has also highlighted consumer willingness to pay for convenience, Weinswig said.

“An Uber ride is not always chaper than a cab ride, which means that consumers are willing to pay a premium for on-demand services,” she wrote. “Armed with this insight, retailers can identify other areas where customers are willing to pay more for convenience.”

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Supermarket News

Retailers have opportunity in ‘sharing economy,’ analyst says

The rise of the so-called “sharing economy” led by the Uber car service app will challenge retailers to respond to customers increasingly demanding similar convenience and delivery speed for all things they consume, according to a new report from analyst Deborah Weinswig of Fung Business Intelligence Center (FBIC).

“Inspired by Uber’s business model and the concept of sharing and an on-demand economy, start-ups are increasingly seeking to ‘Uberfy’ the world with convenient mobile services that match demand with supply conveniently via software,” Weiswig wrote. “From laundry and medical marijuana to in-home massage and the outsoyrcing of errands, there is an app that will get it for you with just one click.

“Those who have experienced these services are going to demand faster turnaround times on everything at the convenience levels they have become accustomed to,” she added. “This new consumer mindset challenges retailers to be more responsive.”

The FBIC report cited startups in dozens of categories that, like Uber, utilize mobile apps aligning supply and demand and facilitate payment allowing for convenient execution of services ranging from babysitting (Urban Sitter) to medical needs (Pager, Medicast) to private jets (Blackjet).


CONNECT WITH SN ON FACEBOOK

Like the Supermarket News page for updates throughout the day.


Launched in San Francisco in 2009, Uber is now available in 200 cities worldwide and has a current market valuation of $ 40 billion, Weinswig noted. Leveraging its drivers has allowed the company to diversify into experimental delivery-on-demand services including UberFRESH, a lunch delivery option now available in certain California markets and Uber Corner Store, which enables delivery of convenience items now testing in the Washington, D.C. area.

Some traditional retailers are already responding to to the on-demand economy with similar services, the report said, citing the British shirt retailer Pink, which has introduced a new app enabling home or office delivery of a shirt within 90 minutes of an order.

The success of Uber and pricing that varies by demand has also highlighted consumer willingness to pay for convenience, Weinswig said.

“An Uber ride is not always chaper than a cab ride, which means that consumers are willing to pay a premium for on-demand services,” she wrote. “Armed with this insight, retailers can identify other areas where customers are willing to pay more for convenience.”

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

North Bay Produce partners with the Produce Mom

The Produce Mom announced the addition of North Bay Produce Inc. to her family of trusted partners. North Bay offers its customers a year-round supply of a variety of fresh produce, thanks to its network of domestic and Latin American growers.The-Produce-Mom-North-Bay-Produce-Infographic

“There’s so much culture represented in this company,” Lori Taylor, The Produce Mom, said in a press release. “Together we will raise consumer confidence and understanding of import produce.”

“Fresh from the Farm, Year Around” is more than a slogan to North Bay. The company currently offers customers a year-round supply of apples, asparagus, blackberries, snow peas, sugar snap peas and blueberries, one of North Bay’s signature items.

The company’s ready-to-eat blueberry snack packs were featured during one of The Produce Mom’s Indy Style segments this summer. North Bay supplies customers with blueberries from its domestic growers spring through fall, then imports fresh blueberries from its Latin American growers during the winter months. Raspberries are offered seasonally, September through June.

“North Bay Produce is committed to providing the world with an uninterrupted supply of high-quality produce,” Sharon Robb, national marketing manager for North Bay, said in the press release. “Partnering with The Produce Mom will allow us to better educate consumers on the year-round freshness, availability and safety of produce.”

The “Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools” initiative, a public health campaign to increase salad bars in schools across the country, is another common goal for the two companies. Mark Girardin, President of North Bay Produce, is a Midwest campaign co-chair for the initiative and serves as a captain for the state of Michigan. Taylor takes every opportunity to promote the initiative, whether it’s on her Indy Style morning show segment, her blog or at a speaking engagement such as The Indiana School Nutrition Association Conference.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Meeting top-quality buyers, suppliers and service providers in one place is a challenge. But consider the number and value of the business opportunities that present themselves when that challenge is met. Asia Fruit Logistica is the unique fresh fruit and vegetable business hub to achieve this goal in Asia.

Asia’s leading trade show for the fresh fruit and vegetable business, which takes place at AsiaWorld-Expo Center in Hong Kong on 4-6 September 2013, is seeing more demand for stand space than ever before.

Companies from 34 countries and all five continents have already registered to exhibit at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, with exhibitors from Ecuador, Morocco and Cyprus making their debut appearance at the show.

Vietnam will also have a national pavilion at this year’s event for the very first time. Coordinated by the country’s fruit and vegetable association, Vinafruit, the Vietnam pavilion will feature eight exhibitors including exporters and importers from the country.

“We believe that exhibiting at Asia Fruit Logistica is a great opportunity to promote Vietnamese fresh fruit to the world and to all our partners in Asia,” said Vinafruit’s Nauyen Van Ky. “Our exporters are looking forward to securing contracts, and to meeting potential quality partners and clients in Asia and worldwide as well as exchanging experience and know-how.”

With its diverse climate and capacity to produce a wide variety of fruit and vegetables year-round, Vietnam boasts significant export potential. The country has set an ambitious target to increase the value of its overall fruit and vegetable exports to US$ 1.2bn by 2020, from US$ 829m last year.

Dragon fruit, pomelo, mangoes and pineapples as well as sweet potato and other vegetables will be among the key products displayed at the Vietnam pavilion.

Many countries are joining Vietnam with national pavilions at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, including Argentina, Australia, China, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, Taiwan and the US.

“It’s amazing how big Asia Fruit Logistica has become and how quickly it’s grown,” said Joon Hong Choi of major South Korean importer Sooil Commerce, a regular visitor to the trade show. “Many Korean importers and retailers are visiting to meet with Asian buyers and suppliers as well their suppliers from other parts of the world like Chile and the US. They can meet everybody they need to see at this event.”

With only a few stands still available at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, book now to secure your access to Asia’s leading buyers. Visitors who register online now (www.asiafruitlogistica.com/tickets) save up to 35 per cent on their admission fee.

For more information:
Sinenart Baramirattanachai
Tel: +66 2 941 4600
[email protected] 
www.asiafruitlogistica.com

Publication date: 6/27/2013


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