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US: Strawberry volumes to pick up in January

US: Strawberry volumes to pick up in January

Volumes of strawberries coming from Mexico are expected to increase at the start of next month, and berries from Florida are also expected to increase in volume during that time. California production will likely increase shortly after, making for robust volumes for the first month of 2015.

“Oxnard should kick into some good volume mid-January,” said Cindy Jewell, vice president of marketing for California Giant Berry Farms. “With all three districts in production, our sales group is looking forward to having promotable volume on strawberries in January.” To date, California production for the year has trailed slightly behind that from last year, with over 151 million flats picked as of December 17 of this year. Production in the state topped 155 million flats by the same date last year.

Florida has also trailed slightly behind last year’s pace, with production for that state at 1.2 million flats as of December 17. But volumes from Mexico are slightly ahead of imports from last year. While 3.9 million flats have been shipped here as of December 17, 3.7 million flats had been shipped by the same date last year.

As of December 18, 2014, the price for a flat of medium-to-large berries out of the Oxnard district was between $ 26.00 and $ 28.00. The price range for a flat at the Mexico crossing through Texas was slightly lower, with prices for a flat falling between $ 24.00 and $ 26.00. With supplies out of Central Florida still light, a flat from that region went for between $ 24.90 and $ 28.90.

For more information:

Cindy Jewell

California Giant Berry Farms

+1 831 728 1965

Publication date: 12/19/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com