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South African grapes again hit by the weather

South African grapes again hit by the weather

The export of South African grapes has been further reduced as a disappointing season for the growers continues. Exports to the UK are down 2 million boxes according to the latest SATGI figures. But a representative from SATGI said the drop in volumes to the UK was the consequence of high winds at the port which stopped the vessels from sailing, and things should even out this week.

Exports to other destinations are almost on par with last year, with South East Asia seeming to win volumes from the Middle East.

Before Christmas the Orange River Region was hit by hail and floods and the already reduced crop estimates have again been dropped 10-15%. Intake is down around 1.6 million cartons compared to last year.

Rain showers have been affecting harvest in the other regions this week with heavy showers reported in the Hex River Valley which led to packing being stopped. In Olifants River and Berg River the quality is reported as being good.

Publication date: 1/9/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Supermarkets Withstand Weather Challenge

ST. LOUIS — Heavy snowfall and subzero temperatures sent Midwesterners scurrying to local grocery stores to prepare, but it was a challenge that didn’t send retailers adrift.

“We’re faring well,” Chon Tomlin, spokeswoman for Save-A-Lot, headquartered here, told SN Monday.

Tomlin said the company prepared in advance for the storm, front-loading stores with staples like canned goods, bread and milk, with each receiving two additional truckloads of goods.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Although all Save-A-Lot stores opened Saturday, corporate stores in St. Louis closed at noon Sunday due to heavy snow.

Schnuck Markets, also in St. Louis, likewise heeded the advance warning by ordering as much merchandise as possible to handle additional demand.

“We have an extensive supply chain and transport our own goods so we could keep pace with regular shipments to stores,” spokeswoman Lori Willis said.

In Dayton, Ohio, it was frigid temperatures, not snow that brought customers to Dorothy Lane Market, said store director Fred Pfeiffer.

“On Saturday, [business] was up 75%,” Pfeiffer said.

“We were pretty well prepared,” he added. “The only thing we ran out of was our artisan breads because there wasn’t enough time for the dough to rise. But we had all the staples.”

Read more: ‘Perfect Storm’ of Cold, Bengals Leads to Record Sales at Kroger

Pfeiffer said that some of the store’s delivery trucks were delayed due to snow in Indiana and that on Monday it may have been temporarily out of a few items.

Elsewhere in the Midwest, Rainbow Foods in Minneapolis said it would close at 8 p.m. Monday due to the intense cold. And Whole Foods Market closed Chicago stores early due to record low temperatures.

In Indianapolis, Kroger distribution centers were running 24 hours behind in stocking stores because employees were unable to make it to work, according to a published report.

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Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Marketing efforts help Georgia peaches wrap up a very sweet season despite rainy weather

When people think of Georgia, they think of peaches. And while the Peach State has not been the nation’s top producer in many years volume-wise, when it comes to quality and name recognition, Georgia still earns its nickname. And this year’s Georgia peach season looks like it may have been one for the record books.

Each year, Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches between mid-May and mid-August. And despite above-average GA-Peaches-1Georgia produces more than 130 million pounds of peaches each year. This season was one for the record books, despite rain throughout July. rainfall during the month of July that hampered harvesting, the Georgia Peach Council said the majority of its members picked and shipped 90 percent of full-crop estimates.

“One of the biggest challenges in a wet summer is consistency, and we managed to have not only excellent consistency but excellent quality from start to finish,” said Will McGehee of the Georgia Peach Council. “Although a final tally is still being determined, from our standpoint as growers, 2013 will wind up being a great year.”

Increased marketing efforts by the Peach Council paid off in retail and media recognition for its “Sweet Georgia Peaches” program.

“All in all, we believe that our marketing and public relations efforts, combined with the sweet and delicious flavor and reputation of Georgia peaches led to an extremely successful 2013 season,” McGehee said.

For retailers, a “Georgia in July” marketing kit available for use by strategic partners in target markets throughout the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest was a hit. The kit included point-of-sale merchandising display bins highlighting freestone peaches, Sweet Georgia Peaches farm market bags, recipes and nutritional information.

Retailers were also encouraged to share the Sweet Georgia Peaches Facebook app with consumers. It allows consumers to send a ‘virtual’ Georgia peach to sweeten someone’s day and can still be accessed by logging onto www.facebook.com/SweetGeorgiaPeaches.

On the consumer front, the council worked extensively to extend its awareness and education efforts from the Midwest to the East Coast. Registered dietitians promoted the versatility of Georgia peaches during televised healthy eating segments in select Southern markets. Sweet Georgia Peaches spokesperson and cookbook author Gena Knox appeared in cooking demonstrations for television stations in major Southeastern markets.

Social media played an increasingly important role in this year’s campaign. In addition to regular Facebook and Twitter posts throughout the season, the council created a YouTube channel to tell the story of Georgia peach farmers, many of whom are fourth- or fifth-generation farmers. A series of videos is available online that highlight the state’s peach producers, explain why Georgia peaches taste so sweet and provide consumers advice on how to pick the perfect peach.

To coincide with the YouTube channel launch and the first day of summer, the council scheduled Sweet Georgia Peach deliveries to television weathercasters in select cities. The result was a flurry of media mentions, as well as Facebook and Twitter posts showing pictures of meteorologists posing with their sweet treats.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Weather takes toll on Northwest cherry crop

James Michael, vice president of marketing-North America for Northwest Cherry Growers and the Washington State Fruit Commission, said the 2013 cherry season was a challenge in every sense of the word. Regional production, originally set in the 16 million to 18 million box range earlier in the season, was recently downgraded to 14.2 million boxes. And weather is the culprit.

“The weather this year is exactly what a cherry grower doesn’t want to see,” Michael told The Produce News Sept. 25. “This is the biggest variation from normal in the past decade.”

Most of the reported damage occurred with the industry’s early crop, which growers began to harvest later than is typical.

The Pacific Northwest experienced significant rainfall at the end of May and beginning of June. Rain was then followed by extreme heat in early August. “The summer rains and heat make cherries more susceptible to damage,” Michael said.

Cherries are neat and tidy packages from a physiological standpoint. But Michael said water can collect at the stem end, and the cherries begin to absorb the excess water. With their skins already stretched tight over the fruit, higher temperatures can increase absorption, and the skins can eventually split.

Michael said there was no discernible pattern to the damage. “Damage was extremely localized in orchards,” he said.

To illustrate, he said, in one case, a gravel road divided orchard locations. On one side of the road, extreme damage was reported. On the other, damage was minimal.

In terms of production and marketing, Michael said the season “was a challenge in both ways. Cherries are an iconic seasonal fruit. Spring came early, and consumers were excited.”

Cherry crops in the Pacific Northwest have steadily grown in volume. Last year’s crop was a record-setter for the industry. Despite the downgrade in 2013 cherry volume, Michael said this season’s crop is still classed as one of the top 10 largest crops.

The region’s cherry growers have increased plantings of both early- and late-season varieties, which has resulted in the extension of the overall cherry season from traditional timeframes. Michael said this new-normal has also pushed out peak volume dates, which are coming later in July.

“It is difficult for the industry and retailers to get a handle on volume during the early season,” he said. “It created an interesting dynamic.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines