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Health & wellness categories will experience unprecedented growth in 2015

Customers walking through your doors are looking for solutions whether they know it or not. They might be wanting to feed their family healthier options. Some may want to feel better, to have more energy, to improve their performance in their day to day life, to boost their sports performance, and last but not least, to age youthfully. Most of them are tired, stressed out and short on time. Plus, given that our country is in an unprecedented healthcare crisis with diseases like diabetes, heart disease and obesity on the rise, most of them might be battling an illness…or two as well.

The already “health and wellness enlightened” will only want to continue making healthy choices. How can we make it easier for them to do so? And, everyone is looking to accomplish all of the above on a budget. The bottom line is, we can help.

Opportunity knocks

We have a huge opportunity to impact our customers’ lives for the better in the coming year. Health can be positively impacted with lifestyle change, and with our current health crises, we can all rise to the occasion and be part of the solution for our customers, our children, our country. Together, let’s fuel the solution.

Get real

Stock up on organics and non-GMO whole foods and products. Consumers will be looking for ingredients they recognize and can pronounce while shopping for food. These consumers also want to see the words “real,” “100% real,” “fresh,” “made from scratch” and “natural.” Products made with high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavors/preservatives, MSG, artificial colors, and growth hormones are not part of a health and wellness solution. It would be beneficial, in the long run, to support companies that support our nation’s health.

Sip on this

The demand for functional and vitality beverages is on the rise. Make sure to have plenty of those beverages to choose from like cold-pressed fruit and vegetable juices, pressure pasteurized young coconut waters, kombuchas and kefirs. These products contain enzymes, antioxidants and probiotics that are good for you. And, yes — they taste good too. A functional and vitality beverage cooler near the checkout is a great idea.

Fit to eat

A nice assortment of organic grass fed lean meats, plant-based proteins and high-quality protein powders are a must as consumers continue to look for healthy options to build lean muscle and recover from resistance training. Plus, vegetarian and vegan shoppers are always on the lookout for non-animal protein sources that will help them meet their daily requirements for protein in a healthful, ethical and environmentally friendly way.

Food for thought

These are just a few ideas to chew on, and make sure to be on top of your game with nutritional supplementation, super foods and specialty grains as well. Visit the health and wellness trade shows like Expo West to stay on top of these trends. And, make sure to bring a person or two who actually eats and drinks these items, so they can provide firsthand, real world insights for you and your team.

How can we make it easy for customers to shop healthier? How can we band together, buy in quantity, and work with manufacturers to keep prices affordable? Anything is possible.

Beyond 2015

Education on all of the above should be a constant drip. Little nuggets of beneficial information delivered consistently over time to inspire and empower your customer toward health and wellness. Gentle reminders in the right direction will strengthen that customer’s trust in your brand and seal the bond of your relationship. That’s how you win a lifestyle customer, not just for a year, but for a lifetime.

There is always room for improvement. How are you going to resolve to evolve your health and wellness business and capture this market growth in 2015?

Supermarket News

Health & wellness categories will experience unprecedented growth in 2015

Customers walking through your doors are looking for solutions whether they know it or not. They might be wanting to feed their family healthier options. Some may want to feel better, to have more energy, to improve their performance in their day to day life, to boost their sports performance, and last but not least, to age youthfully. Most of them are tired, stressed out and short on time. Plus, given that our country is in an unprecedented healthcare crisis with diseases like diabetes, heart disease and obesity on the rise, most of them might be battling an illness…or two as well.

The already “health and wellness enlightened” will only want to continue making healthy choices. How can we make it easier for them to do so? And, everyone is looking to accomplish all of the above on a budget. The bottom line is, we can help.

Opportunity knocks

We have a huge opportunity to impact our customers’ lives for the better in the coming year. Health can be positively impacted with lifestyle change, and with our current health crises, we can all rise to the occasion and be part of the solution for our customers, our children, our country. Together, let’s fuel the solution.

Get real

Stock up on organics and non-GMO whole foods and products. Consumers will be looking for ingredients they recognize and can pronounce while shopping for food. These consumers also want to see the words “real,” “100% real,” “fresh,” “made from scratch” and “natural.” Products made with high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavors/preservatives, MSG, artificial colors, and growth hormones are not part of a health and wellness solution. It would be beneficial, in the long run, to support companies that support our nation’s health.

Sip on this

The demand for functional and vitality beverages is on the rise. Make sure to have plenty of those beverages to choose from like cold-pressed fruit and vegetable juices, pressure pasteurized young coconut waters, kombuchas and kefirs. These products contain enzymes, antioxidants and probiotics that are good for you. And, yes — they taste good too. A functional and vitality beverage cooler near the checkout is a great idea.

Fit to eat

A nice assortment of organic grass fed lean meats, plant-based proteins and high-quality protein powders are a must as consumers continue to look for healthy options to build lean muscle and recover from resistance training. Plus, vegetarian and vegan shoppers are always on the lookout for non-animal protein sources that will help them meet their daily requirements for protein in a healthful, ethical and environmentally friendly way.

Food for thought

These are just a few ideas to chew on, and make sure to be on top of your game with nutritional supplementation, super foods and specialty grains as well. Visit the health and wellness trade shows like Expo West to stay on top of these trends. And, make sure to bring a person or two who actually eats and drinks these items, so they can provide firsthand, real world insights for you and your team.

How can we make it easy for customers to shop healthier? How can we band together, buy in quantity, and work with manufacturers to keep prices affordable? Anything is possible.

Beyond 2015

Education on all of the above should be a constant drip. Little nuggets of beneficial information delivered consistently over time to inspire and empower your customer toward health and wellness. Gentle reminders in the right direction will strengthen that customer’s trust in your brand and seal the bond of your relationship. That’s how you win a lifestyle customer, not just for a year, but for a lifetime.

There is always room for improvement. How are you going to resolve to evolve your health and wellness business and capture this market growth in 2015?

Supermarket News

SOLD! on health and wellness real estate

Last year we dedicated real estate in our stores to our Living Well health and wellness initiative. Here’s what we learned…

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

The endcaps that performed the best were in the front of the store, facing the checkouts near Starbucks or the main entrance and marked with substantial signage (see image). Not only were we able to sell more product, but it communicated to our customers, as soon as they stepped in the door, that we are committed to health and wellness.

EASY STREET

Customers are hunting for wholesome solutions. Curate these products together in one consistent and dependable location, making it easy for them to fill their carts with nutritious choices.

LESS IS MORE

We select only 3-5 products at a time and used large groupings of the same items so the display would have a dramatic impact (see image).

CURB APPEAL

Keep it neat and tidy. Minimize clutter. Use woven baskets on the shelves to hold smaller items like spices or protein bars. Fill in any gaps that are created when using shorter items alongside taller ones by stacking the shorter items on granite slabs. Radius shelving takes the edge off and gives your display an interesting dimension. And, freestanding, galvanized bucket pedestals in front of the display maximize selling space, while still keeping it easy on the eye.

TURNOVER

Update the display on a monthly basis to keep it fresh. Use a different theme every month for example, healthy: Back to school, comfort foods, snacking and holiday. Or, pull together key ingredients for a nutritious recipe each month, making sure to also supply a copy of the recipe at the display (see Easy Street).

PRICE

Although most customers know that spending their shopping dollar on healthy food choices is the best investment they can make, bottom line is everyone wants a deal. Coordinate with your buyers to ensure that whatever is being displayed is also on sale.

OPEN HOUSE

Pick a two-hour window one day each month to sample a few of the products on the display. We found 4-6 p.m. on a Friday very effective and called it a “Healthy Happy Hour.” It was then promoted in a fun and casual way via social media.

THE CLOSING

Your associates are the best ambassadors for a health and wellness initiative. Let them sample these items. Get them excited about feeling healthy. They are an invaluable asset and the ones that end up closing the deal with the customer.

Are you already in the market? If so, please share your health and wellness real estate tips with us.

Supermarket News

Supermarkets urged to take high road on wellness

Supermarkets need to step up their games in the face of mixed consumer reactions to their health and wellness efforts.

That’s the opinion of Phil Lempert, The Supermarket Guru, who urged new approaches during a presentation at SN‘s educational event during Natural Products Expo East in Baltimore.

Phil Lempert tells an Expo East audience that supermarkets need to “take the lead” in health and wellness. (Photo by Kate Patterson)He outlined the mixed results of a recent consumer survey his organization conducted for SN Whole Health. In the survey, about half of respondents rated their supermarkets only fair in selection of natural, organic and better-for-you products and in servicing their desire to eat healthier.

“Where’s the disconnect, we’re only delivering fair,” he said.

Supermarkets need to act at a time when they are facing a range of challenges across their businesses, from shrinking store sizes to increased retail competition and the growth of online-only rivals.

“I’ve never seen in my career as many changes in the supermarket industry,” he said. “And it’s going to get worse in the next five years.”

Part of the solution on the wellness front is for supermarkets to embrace the role of being the trusted party because consumers are confused about the facts, on issues such as GMO labeling, he said.

“Supermarkets have the opportunity to offer unbiased, factual, traceable information, and very few are doing it,” he explained.

“Some huge chains with thousands of stores have only one or two registered dietitians for the entire chain. So the message isn’t getting out to consumers.”


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Supermarkets also need to be honest and proactive in communicating their local products initiatives, he added.

“Consumers are confused about sustainability, local and fresh,” he said. “We need clearer definitions. Supermarkets need to be truthful.

“Let’s take the lead on health and nutrition traceability.”

Lempert said the industry can learn from Walmart’s tough approach in making sure it meets sustainability goals.

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Supermarket News

Four crucial wellness questions for supermarkets

Supermarkets are making big advances in health and wellness but haven’t figured it all out.

Natural Products Expo East, which runs Sept. 17-20 in Baltimore, is a good place to make progress.

That’s because Expo’s exhibition and educational sessions bring together important insights for retailers. Moreover, SN will hold a half-day educational event there on the morning of the 17th. Our event will help answer a number of timely questions related to supermarkets and wellness. Here are four I would especially point to:

1-What do shoppers think about supermarket performance?

I’ll give you a hint: The news isn’t all good. Shoppers are sometimes quite critical of how supermarkets execute on wellness strategies, pointing to high prices and associates who aren’t always knowledgeable about products, according to a newly released SN consumer survey. Shoppers are trying to step up their own health behaviors and they expect stores to do the same. At SN’s event this week, Phil Lempert,  The Supermarket Guru and contributing editor for SN, will present the results of this survey, which he conducted for SN Whole Health.

2-What’s hot at retail and what’s next?

Wellness trends would be a lot easier to understand if they weren’t moving so quickly. Retailers need to react fast because emerging categories can peak and wane in a short period of time. To help supermarkets respond, SN’s event will include a presentation that showcases the trajectory of trends ranging from protein to special diets, using proprietary tools. The focus will be on the current status of these trends and where things are headed. Speakers include those from FoodEssentials and New Hope Natural Media.

3-How can wellness strategies help transform a supermarket retailer?

Many retailers are trying to figure out whether merchandising healthy products and services  can make a significant and sustained difference in their businesses.

There are some good case studies to point to, and one of the best is Wakefern Food Corp., the winner of SN’s 2014 Whole Health Enterprise Award. That wholesaler and its member retailers have infused wellness strategies into their operations using their knowledge of local shoppers. Attendees at SN’s event will see a Wakefern executive accept the award and a follow-up panel spotlight the company’s achievements.

4-What are the latest opportunities for natural and organic brands at supermarkets?

Small- to medium-sized brands have a lot to learn about working with supermarkets. It’s a lot different than supplying natural food stores. In fact, terms like partnership and collaboration have very specific meanings in the supermarket space. SN’s event will include a session in which distribution and brokerage executives will explain the supermarket retail territory to brands.

Expo East is actually produced by SN’s parent company, Penton. I encourage you to attend SN’s event and stay over for Expo East. We’ll be reporting the news from Baltimore in the coming days so stay tuned.

Supermarket News

Connecting with customers on wellness

It’s an exciting time to be in the grocery business, as food retailers have the opportunity to make a measurable difference in consumers’ lives. Grocers have truly become a destination for health and wellness.

As a registered dietitian for Wakefern, I witness innumerable opportunities that demonstrate the intersections among food, nutrition and pharmacy at the retail level. I am excited to partner with the Food Marketing Institute (FMI) to help bring these big ideas to life at the FMI Health & Wellness Retail Zone at FMI Connect in June, a dedicated area showcasing how retailers can make their store a health and wellness destination for shoppers.

At ShopRite stores, we’re witnessing a surging momentum and interest in health and nutrition among consumers that our retail dietitians can help encourage. Specifically, FMI research demonstrates that the majority of shoppers across age groups do put some effort into eating healthily, while only six percent don’t try at all. Among those consumers making the effort, 74 percent report success with eating healthily more than half the time, which is the highest rate since 2007 [Shopping for Health 2013].

Before I came to Wakefern in 2005 I spent many years in the clinical setting. This experience enables me to help customers shop better and influence merchandising strategies in order to make healthy choices more accessible and convenient. The good news is that through surveys that we’ve done through FMI, we see an upward trend in the number of dietitians in supermarkets: Eighty-five percent of companies surveyed have a corporate dietitian, 30 percent have an in-store dietitian and 25 percent have regional dietitians [FMI 2013 Retailer Contributions to Health & Wellness Survey].

These dietitians work in parallel with pharmacists in order to help educate and counsel on food allergies; offer health screenings; counsel on drug interactions; emphasize weight management courses; and even develop specialty recipes. I work closely with ShopRite pharmacies on in-store programs, such as diabetes management, lectures and screenings, drug-nutrient interaction counseling and medication management. We also create events and in-store programs featuring cooking classes; Facebook chats; recipes; lifestyle choice labels and one-on-one consultations.

By implementing and leveraging a strong health and wellness strategy, retailers can tailor programs to their unique customer bases and serve as a community resource. At FMI Connect in June, we’ll be introducing various screenings and new applications to the exhibit floor at the Health & Wellness Retail Zone. These screenings will serve as engagement tools and will help to identify ideas for retailers who wish to augment their wellness initiatives.

Complementing the health screenings, we’ll also feature retailers and vendors presenting case studies and solutions at a demo stage in the Zone. The demo topics include inspiring concepts such as how to implement a corporate wellness program, to the role of the dietitian in stores.

Reflected in our work as an industry, food retail has proved to be a physical hub for health and wellness and food retailers represent the future of health care. Neighborhood supermarkets are now destinations for food, pharmacy and healthy living.

Join the #FMIConnect conversation or engage us via #FMIHealth. Visit www.FMIConnect.org for more information.

Supermarket News

Supermarkets need health and wellness partners: panelist

Margaux Drake, the “Living Well’” lifestyle expert for D&W Fresh Market.

Supermarket operators can boost health and wellness sales by partnering with companies that serve consumers interested in healthy lifestyles, a speaker told the Supermarket News at Expo West conference in Anaheim, Calif., Thursday.


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Margaux Drake, the “Living Well’” lifestyle expert for D&W Fresh Market, Grand Rapids, Mich., said operators need to think outside the box. “You can’t force someone to decide to be health- and wellness-minded. You have to go into the community to find people who have already made that decision and let them know you have the products they are looking for,” she advised.

Drake said she has worked with sports retailers, automotive dealers and others whose customers lead an active lifestyle and invited those customers to events geared to healthy living, such as spin classes — “anything where you can meet face-to-face with potential customers. And then you need to invite them on store tours immediately after the special events.”

Read more: SN’s coverage of Natural Products Expo West

Speaking at the same session, John Creed, category manager for natural, frozen and dairy for Unified Grocers, Los Angeles, said independents are looking for ways to take advantage of new trends, and setting up wellness centers in their stores with the help of CPG companies and food brokers is one way to create a “signature” or “personality” for the store Creed said he expects such partnerships to grow “as retailers look for ways to set themselves apart.”

The SN event was held just prior to the start of the Natural Products Expo West, which is sponsored by New Hope. Both SN and New Hope are divisions of Penton Media.

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Supermarket News

Health and wellness must be storewide: retail panel

Retailers interested in pursuing health and wellness programs at their stores must be willing to make a total storewide commitment to the concept, a panel of industry executives said Thursday during a discussion at Supermarket News at Expo West in Anaheim, Calif.


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“Too often companies can be close-minded and keep doing the same old/same old,” Raymond McCall, SVP of pharmacy and HBC for Ahold USA, Quincy, Mass., said. “But there’s been a paradigm shift, with consumers telling us they’d prefer we focus on health and wellness on endcaps, and that’s something we have to educate our category managers and merchandisers about.

“You can’t simply be tactical about it. You must be very strategic.”

Stephanie Steiner, director of sales and marketing for Unified Grocers’ Market Centre, added. “Health and wellness can’t stop with the center store. You can’t be authentic and still sell reheated frozen macaroni and fried chicken that’s become tough in your service deli without also offering leafy greens. That approach is what gets in the way of the kind of health and wellness programs we’re trying to build.”

Read more: SN’s coverage of Natural Products Expo West

During the same session, entitled “Leveraging the Total Store Health Experience,” Thomas Honer, owner of two Harvest Market IGA stores in Northern California — in Mendocino and Fort Bragg — said while it may be difficult to change the attitudes of adults toward healthier eating, it is possible to start with schoolchildren. He said his company started a program with the local school district seven years ago to feature a fruit or vegetable every month that kids can take home — an effort that has helped increase produce sales at his stores.

Supermarket News at Expo West was held just prior to the Natural Products Expo West, sponsored by New Hope. Both SN and New Hope are owned by Penton Media.

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Supermarket News

Audio slideshow: Talking wellness

SN’s annual Whole Health survey of industry professionals illustrated demand for health and wellness products.

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Supermarket News

Produce for Kids campaign to benefit health and wellness classroom projects

Last fall, Produce for Kids teamed up with ACME Markets, Meijer Stores, Publix Super Markets and more than 20 fruit and vegetable suppliers for the second annual Healthy Families, Helping Kids campaign. During the 2013 campaign, more than $ 190,000 was raised to benefit local health and wellness classroom projects through DonorsChoose.org.

Funds raised during the campaign are now sponsoring health and wellness classroom projects within participating grocers’ markets to be matched by public donations made to the site over the coming months. The match funding will include projects like Ms. Soble’s, in which students will be learning about nutrition by making smoothies in the classroom, and Mrs. Hester’s, which needs materials to grow a garden with her class to teach them more about where their food comes from.

“We are extremely pleased to announce the success of our Healthy Families, Helping Kids campaign to benefit local classroom projects in each of our participating retail partners’ local communities,” John Shuman, president of Produce for Kids, said in a press release. “Together, we’ll be able to help support hundreds of classroom projects across the country and help students make healthier choices.”

The 2012 Healthy Families, Helping Kids campaign raised more than $ 169,000 to support 652 classroom projects. The 2013 campaign is on track to support even more classroom projects this year. Teachers in participating grocers’ markets are encouraged to upload their health and nutrition-based classroom projects to receive funding from the Healthy Families, Helping Kids campaign.

Produce for Kids will be enlisting the help of the public to match donations to all projects that meet these requirements. For more information on teacher eligibility, please visit http://www.donorschoose.org/donors/viewChallenge.html?id=242936.

From September through October 2013, participating fresh fruit and vegetable companies made a donation to DonorsChoose.org, an online charity aimed at helping public and charter school teachers across America, based on the support of their fresh produce items at participating grocery stores. The more items shoppers added to their shopping lists, the more local classrooms would benefit.

Participating produce companies include: Acosta Sales & Marketing; Amco Produce; Bolthouse Farms; Crunch Pak; Del Monte Foods; DOLE Salads; Earthbound Farm; Fresh Express; Georgia Pecan Commission; Highline Mushrooms; JOH; Mastronardi Produce; Michigan Apple Committee; Oppenheimer; POM Wonderful; Potandon Produce; Stemilt Growers; Shuman Produce; T. Marzetti Co.; Ventura Foods; Village Farms; Westmoreland Sales; and Zeigler’s.

For more information about the Healthy Families, Helping Kids campaign visit produceforkids.com.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Health and wellness needs storewide approach, speakers tell NGA

Retailers interested in making their stores a health and wellness destination need to be sure to let customers know they are in that business through signage and other point-of-sale materials, speakers told a workshop session Tuesday during the annual convention of the National Grocers Association in Las Vegas. Jonathan Tucker, VP, pharmacy, for Wakefern Food Corp., Keasbey, N.J., said the cooperative’s ShopRite stores have adopted “a whole-store strategy for health and wellness to …

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Supermarket News

A new approach to health and wellness

An interview with Margaux Drake is always a lively and educational one.

Drake is D&W Fresh Market’s energetic and enthusiastic Living Well Lifestyle Expert. Her mission: “to spread the gospel of health and wellness one day at a time.”

I have interviewed her several times over the last year. Each time we talk, she is more than eager to share the latest and greatest D&W wellness offerings. My discussion with her last week was no different.

“Wait until you hear what we’re doing now!” she exclaimed.

When she was hired about one year ago, her main responsibility was to host in-store health workshops. While she continues to do that, she now has become a liaison between D&W and the community. She reaches out to area businesses to form co-sponsored events.

Some of these events have taken place at D&W stores. Take the free spin class that was held in November in the parking lot of one of its stores. A local bike shop provided the equipment, and participants exercised to DJ’d songs.

D&W just built on its relationship with the bike company by sponsoring its bike club. The D&W logo will be emblazoned on the back of the bikers’ riding jerseys. And Drake will offer refreshments and health information at the bike company’s in-house workshops.

Drake calls such partnerships a “win-win” because D&W gets access to the bike company’s customers, and vice versa.

Drake has also made herself known off-site as well. She attends business and community events to explain D&W’s commitment to health and wellness. For example, she recently visited Gazelle Sports, a healthy lifestyle clothing and equipment store, where she hosted a “Happy Hour” featuring infused-water.

She can also be found at community walks and 10k runs, where she works the “D&W Fresh Market Re-Hydration Station.”

D&W has the right idea.

Since most retail stores don’t have the scale to compete with large national chains on price, D&W can differentiate itself in a different way, Jim Hertel, managing partner at Willard Bishop, Barrington, Ill.

Likewise, by partnering with a local business, as opposed to a big national company, D&W makes it known that it wants to be part of the community, Hertel said.

As younger consumers become more influential, retailers need to show they appreciate their likes and interests.

D&W is doing just that.

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Supermarket News

Study Reveals Trends of Wellness ‘Superusers’

NEW YORK — Just 26% of the population accounts for more than 61% of spending on health and wellness products, according to a study by AlixPartners here.

Such “superusers” spend four times per month more than the average consumer on health and wellness products but can be challenging to target as their willingness to pay more for product attributes tends to vary widely and they often shop in unexpected channels, Alix said.

The study found that superusers allocate more than four times as much of their monthly health and wellness-related expenditures on fresh fruits and vegetables ($ 81.93 vs. $ 19.12), more than three-and-a-half times as much on fresh meat and seafood ($ 56.01 vs. $ 15.58) and more than five times as much on dairy products ($ 31.15 vs. $ 5.65).


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However, it also finds that superusers on average spend almost seven times as much on prepackaged foods ($ 18.70 vs. just $ 2.70); over five times as much on frozen foods ($ 16.34 vs. $ 2.90); almost five times as much on non-alcoholic beverages ($ 12.99 vs. $ 2.75); almost five times as much on prepared/ready-to-eat foods ($ 10.50 vs. $ 2.11) and over five times as much on snack foods ($ 8.50 vs. $ 1.61). T

he study found that superusers were willing to pay more for products with certain characteristics than others. For example, just 2% said they would pay greater than 10% more for gluten-free items, vs. 15% who said they would pay 10% more for locally sourced products.

Supermarkets are capturing no less than 43% of superusers’ health and wellness spending, the study added, noting that was a higher percentage than mass retailers (17%), club stores (12%) and large health-food stores like Whole Foods (16%). In dollar terms, that equates to superuser spending on health and wellness products of $ 101.94 per month at traditional grocers, $ 39.37 at mass retailers, $ 38.51 at large health food stores and $ 29.04 at club stores, Alix said.

However, supermarket channel health and wellness shoppers tend to skew older, with shoppers 48 to 66 years old spending 47% of their health and wellness budget in that channel. By comparison, shoppers aged 18-24 purchase only 31% of their health and wellness products from traditional grocers.

“These trends point to continued pressure on traditional grocers and highlight the channel diversification of health and wellness spending,” said Richard Vitaro, a director in AlixPartners’ consumer products practice. “At the same time, large health food stores are attracting more than their overall market share of superusers as well as Millennials.”

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Supermarket News

Hannaford Opens Wellness Center

ALBANY, N.Y. — Hannaford has opened a community wellness center here that offers group exercise, weight management programs and personal training.

The 5,277-square-foot “Healthy Living Center,” located inside a Hannaford supermarket at 900 Central Ave. here, is the result of a partnership between the retailer, the Capital District YMCA and health insurer CDPHP.

In addition to fitness, the center offers programs that address specific health needs, such as Pedaling for Parkinson’s and diabetes prevention.


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“We look forward to welcoming our shoppers to this pioneering facility which will undoubtedly serve as a new model for community health services,” Rudy DiPietro, vice president of retail operations for Hannaford, Scarborough, said in a statement.

While many of the services are free, there are charges for some, including massage.

The Healthy Living Center features a group exercise room, fitness equipment, personal lockers and shower facilities.

Representatives from CDPHP will be available daily to answer questions regarding health and insurance needs, Medicare and New York State Health Exchange options.

The Center is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

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Supermarket News