Blog Archives

Seafood Processors From Around the World Receive FDA Warning Letters

Foreign seafood processors in Ecuador, Portugal, Malaysia, Spain and Vietnam have, in the past month or so, have received warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

All face the possibility of having their fish or fish products detained at the U.S. border without any physical examination unless FDA’s concerns are addressed. And, while the alleged violations differ, almost all involve the U.S. requirement that the processor of fish or fishery products adhere to a specific Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan.

Two seafood processors in Ecuador received warning letters. The Guayaquil-based Star Company S.A. was subjected to FDA inspection last June 2-3, 2014, and was afterwards provided with a copy of the FDA 483 form containing inspector observations.

Star Company responded in writing on July 4, 2014, with corrective measures it planned to take, but the company did not provide FDA with a copy of its HACCP plan.

In the Sept. 24 warning letter, FDA told the company that it must have a HACCP plan with a hazard analysis for each kind of fish or fish product it processes. Star Company is a processor of both wild- and farm-raised shrimp, and FDA said that each of those must be addressed in the HACCP plan.

While in Ecuador, FDA also inspected Duran-based Crimasa Criaderos De Mariscos, S.A. on June 5-6, 2014. It is also a processor of both farm-raised and wild-caught shrimp, and it, too, was provided with the written observations of the inspectors. Crimasa responded in writing on June 27, 2014, but FDA said the responses were not adequate because the company did not revise its HACCP plan to include aquacultured shrimp products.

The Nov. 24 warning letter says the company must address biological, chemical, or physical properties that may cause its farm-raised shrimp on-shell product to become unsafe.

The earliest date for this series of warning letters was Oct. 2, when Gialmar-Produtos Alimentares S.A. was contacted about an FDA inspection of its seafood-processing plant last Feb. 11-12, 2014. The agency was not satisfied with the HACCP plan the Portuguese company provided. An inadequate plan means the company’s fresh and frozen sardines, mackerel, and horse mackerel are adulterated, according to FDA.

Malaysian seafood processor QL Figo Foods SDN BHD received a Nov. 5, 2014, warning letter stemming from an FDA inspection that occurred last May 21, and 22, 2014. Figo provided FDA with written changes to its HACCP plan involving several of its fish and lobster products, but the agency found that the revisions violated HACCP regulations. For example, in its revisions, the Malaysian seafood processor did not take into account the food safety hazard of botulism growth and toxin formation, FDA stated.

FDA also had concerns about temperature controls and monitoring, along with the use of color additives and labeling. It also listed several of the seafood processors’ products that are misbranded.

FDA sent a Nov.  14 warning letter to Spain’s Balfego and Balfego S.L. about the adequacy of its HACCP plan for processing sashimi-grade Bluefin tuna. The company sent a revised HACCP plan to FDA in August after the agency conducted as inspection last April 7-8, 2014.

“Review of the documentation provided by your firm revealed that responses were not adequate as further described in this letter,” the FDA warning states. The agency indicated it viewed the Bluefin tuna produced by Balfeo and Balfeo as adulterated. FDA provided the company with six pages of detailed corrections it is requiring covering temperatures, monitoring, and vessel records, among other topics.

A Ho Chi Minh City seafood processor is the latest of the foreign counties to get an FDA warning letter. Cau Tre Export Goods Processing  Joint Stock Company produces frozen shrimp dumplings, snow crab with garlic butter, frozen shrimp and other fishery products.

FDA stated that it found HACCP violations at Cau Tre during an inspection conducted last April 14-15, 2014.  The company then provided FDA with documentation on changes, but the warning letter states that those changes are “serious deviations” from HACCP regulations.

FDA pointed out that the cooking critical control point suggested by Cau Tre was not sufficient to control pathogen growth and its catching critical control point never insures any checks for heavy metals.

Two domestic seafood processors also received FDA warning letters during November. Detroit-based Sherwood Food Distributors was warned on Nov. 19 about failures with HACCP implementation and inadequate sanitation controls.

Finally, the Hickory Smokehouse of Las Vegas was the subject of a Nov. 14 warning letter about its refrigerated and frozen vacuum-packaged, ready-to-eat hot and cold smoked salmon and trout. The Las Vegas company must address both seafood HACCP and mislabeling concerns, according to FDA.

Warning letters require responses to FDA within 15 days.

Food Safety News

Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’

Animal teeth, bones and plant remains have helped researchers from Cambridge, China and America to pinpoint a date for what could be the earliest sustained human habitation at high altitude.

Archaeological discoveries from the ‘roof of the world’ on the Tibetan Plateau indicate that from 3,600 years ago, crop growing and the raising of livestock was taking place year-round at hitherto unprecedented altitudes.

The findings, published today in Science, demonstrate that across 53 archaeological sites spanning 800 miles, there is evidence of sustained farming and human habitation between 2,500 metres above sea level (8,200ft) and 3,400 metres (11,154ft).

Evidence of an intermittent human presence on the Tibetan Plateau has been dated to at least 20,000 years ago, with the first semi-permanent villages established only 5,200 years ago. The presence of crops and livestock at the altitudes discovered by researchers indicates a more sustained human presence than is needed to merely hunt game at such heights.

Professor Martin Jones, from Cambridge’s Department of Archaeology, and one of the lead researchers on the project, said: “Until now, when and how humans started to live and farm at such extraordinary heights has remained an open question. Our understanding of sustained habitation above 2-3,000m on the Tibetan Plateau has to date been hampered by the scarcity of archaeological data available.

“But our findings show that not only did these farmer-herders conquer unheard of heights in terms of raising livestock and growing crops like barley and millet, but that human expansion into the higher, colder altitudes took place as the continental temperatures were becoming colder.

“Year-round survival at these altitudes must have led to some very challenging conditions indeed — and this poses further, interesting questions for researchers about the adaptation of humans, livestock and crops to life at such dizzying heights.”

Professor Jones hopes more work will now be undertaken to look at genetic resistance in humans to altitude sickness, and genetic response in crop plants in relation to attributes such as grain vernalisation, flowering time response and ultraviolet radiation tolerance — as well as research into the genetic and ethnic identity of the human communities themselves.

Research on the Tibetan Plateau has also raised interesting questions about the timing and introduction of Western crops such as barley and wheat — staples of the so-called ‘Fertile Crescent’. From 4,000-3,600 years ago, this meeting of east and west led to the joining or displacement of traditional North Chinese crops of broomcorn and foxtail millet. The importation of Western cereals enabled human communities to adapt to the harsher conditions of higher altitudes in the Plateau.

In order to ascertain during what period and at what altitude sustained food produced first enabled an enduring human presence, the research group collected artefacts, animal bones and plant remains from 53 sites across the late Yangshao, Majiayao, Qiija, Xindian, Kayue and Nuomuhong cultures.

Cereal grains (foxtail millet, broomcorn millet, barley and wheat) were identified at all 53 sites and animal bones and teeth (from sheep, cattle and pig) were discovered at ten sites. Of the 53 sites, an earlier group (dating from 5,200-3,600 years ago) reached a maximum elevation of 2,527m while a later group of 29 sites (dating from 3,600-2,300 years ago) approached 3,400m in altitude.

Professor Jones believes the Tibetan Plateau research could have wider and further-reaching implications for today’s world in terms of global food security and the possibilities of rebalancing the ‘global diet’; at present heavily, and perhaps unsustainably, swayed in favour of the big three crops of rice, wheat and maize.

He said: “Our current knowledge of agricultural foods emphasises a relatively small number of crops growing in the intensively managed lowlands. The more we learn about the rich ecology of past and present societies, and the wider range of crops they raised in the world’s more challenging environments, the more options we will have for thinking through food security issues in the future.”

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

‘Big data’ takes root in world of plant research

Botanists at Trinity College Dublin have launched a database with information that documents significant ‘life events’ for nearly 600 plant species across the globe. They clubbed together with like-minded individuals working across five different continents to compile the huge database of plant life histories, for which data have been gathered over a near 50-year span.

At a time in which climate change and increasing human populations are rapidly re-shaping plant distributions, the researchers hope their COMPADRE Plant Matrix database will foster collaborations between scientists and allow them to better answer questions such as how we can conserve the species that are critical for ecosystem services, and which may provide food for billions.

The researchers have just published an article in the international, peer-reviewed publication Journal of Ecology that describes the database. By making the precious data it contains free to download, they hope to inspire and accelerate important global research on plant biology.

“We hope that other scientists will use these data to answer questions such as why, unlike humans, some plants don’t deteriorate as they age, why some environments are better for agriculture than others, and how fast plant populations will move in response to climate change,” said Professor of Zoology in Trinity’s School of Natural Sciences, Yvonne Buckley.

She added: “Making the database freely available is our 21st Century revamp of the similarly inspired investments in living plant collections that were made to botanic gardens through the centuries; these were also set up to bring economic, medicinal and agricultural advantages of plants to people all over the world. Our database is moving this gift into the digital age of ‘Big Data’.”

We are used to shops, websites and companies keeping track of our purchases, what we eat, who we date, and even when and how we exercise. Keeping track of the most intimate details of life, death and reproduction should not be unique to human populations, though.

We rely on plants for some of our most basic needs like food, shelter and clothing. It is therefore vital that we know the ‘hows’, ‘whys’ and ‘wherefores’ governing the success of a diverse range of plant species so that we can protect them and put them to use for the good of the world.

The COMPADRE database contains far more information than one person could ever hope to pull together over a lifetime. The data have been collected over the past 48 years by many scientists on five continents, with sites ranging from the searing heat of deserts to the freezing cold of arctic and alpine plant communities. As a result, there are almost infinite questions for researchers to explore.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Trinity College Dublin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

China drives world pear production

China drives world pear production

World pear production has increased about a third over the last decade, and China, the world’s leading producer of pears, is the main driver of that growth.

For the 2002-2003 season, world pear production was just under 15 million MT. That rose to over 21 million MT in for the 2012-2013 season, and the majority of that production can be attributed to Chinese growers. All of the world’s growers outside of China account for a little over five million MT of the world’s production. By contrast, Chinese growers account for over 16 million MT of pears.

Outside of China, Argentina and the United States are the biggest growers of pears, with Argentina producing just over 800,000 MT during the 2012-2013 season and the US producing just under 800,000 MT. Italy accounted for over 700,000 MT for the same period, and Spain, Turkey, South Africa and Japan all produced under 400,000 MT for the year. 


Publication date: 6/26/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

PMA 2014: Brave new produce world

It’s not everyday you hear a reference to Waterworld at a food industry conference.

“At out technology event in May in San Diego, Joe Quirk of the Seasteading Institute, gave what I found a fascinating presentation on his organization’s plans to create floating cities that would be self sufficient in food production,” said PMA CEO Bryan Silbermann at the Fresh Summit state of the industry address in Anaheim, Calif.

“Think about that for a second, and if your mind works anything like mine, this might conjure up images of Kevin Costner in the movie Waterworld.”

In the floating island’s case, the project has financial backing from a founder of Paypal, according to Silbermann.

While Silbermann was using Waterworld to point out that these floating cities may seen farfetched at first glance, I would argue that Waterworld is an interesting metaphor for those grappling with scarcity. As Silbermann and Burns said, we do indeed have less water available in some parts of the world and limited resources on things like land.

“Shrinking natural resources are changing the business model for growing produce. We’re mostly talking about greens, tomatoes, berries, herbs and the like, but when you combine the demand that the consumer will have for food and the challenge of high cost refrigerated transportation, you can really understand why there is additional investment going on in protected agriculture,” said PMA president Kathy Burns.

During the state of the industry address, the PMA leaders urged the industry to adapt a change of perspective and to utilize Jack Uldridge’s concept of “unlearning” what they know in order to consider new changes in technology.  Silbermann and Burns told the produce industry to be open to adopting technology used in other industries. The use of drones on farm fields is one example Burns gave of an innovative adoption by the produce industry of existing technology.

Supermarket News

European suppliers maintain presence at World Food Moscow

European suppliers maintain presence at World Food Moscow

Despite the restrictions imposed on European goods by the Russian government, there was a healthy European presence at the recent World Food Moscow. Though it’s uncertain when the current situation between Russia and the European Union will be resolved, European fresh produce suppliers want to maintain their relationships in Russia for when the situation improves.

“There were quite a lot of Europeans attending,” noted Irina Koziy, general director of «FruitNews» News Agency in Russia. Koziy attended the event and noted that although the attendees were more nervous than usual, given the current political climate and embargo on food products, European participants made a strong impression.

“For me, personally, their attendance left a very good impression,” said Koziy. “Because even though they’re not able to send their products to Russia, it shows they’re serious about this market.” That European suppliers are willing to make an effort to maintain the relationships they have in Russia is a testament to the importance the Russian market has for European shippers. But the relationship is a reciprocal one, and many Russian buyers are also eager for a resolution to the current situation.

“Some Russian companies have been able to find new partners and change their sources,” noted Koziy. “For other companies, it’s a big challenge if they focused on products that came from the European Union.” Programs that could be used to wean Russians off foreign imports may pay off in the long run, but they currently aren’t much help because it takes more than just one season for local producers to make up for the deficit brought on by the European ban.

“You can’t plant an orchard to have a peach harvest in less than one year,” explained Koziy. “So we just have to survive with the changes that have happened and hope that those changes will be played back in the next few months for the good of the Russian market and Russian customers.” It’s hard to tell the full impact that the ban on European goods has had on supplies of food or prices because the fresh produce market is always in flux. For consumers, who often deal with price fluctuations and changing inventories, current market conditions could be just a more pronounced version of a typical year. But the effects are there, and even if consumers can’t quantify them exactly, they see fewer options and higher prices. That the effects are apparent to everyone in the country, however, doesn’t guarantee that the cause of those effects – the ban on European goods – will be lifted any time soon.

“We know a lot of people are complaining about the current prices and even the Russian government has recognized that prices went up because of restrictions implemented on food products,” said Koziy. “But we are not in Europe, so the Russian government is not going to change its decisions immediately just because prices went up. So I really don’t know what the Russian government is planning.”

Publication date: 9/26/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Keep Food Penalty-Free at Your World Cup Party

Whether you’re rooting for Argentina or Germany in the World Cup final on Sunday, make sure that your match-viewing is penalty-free by following the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s food safety advice. The agency has even made the eye-catching graphic below to help you out.

Unless you are the goal keeper, using your hands is not permitted in soccer. The same goes for food handling in order to keep everything safe. Before and after preparing or handling food, always wash hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds. Use clean platters to serve and restock food, and keep surfaces clean.

Avoid cross-contamination by keeping raw meats separate from other foods. Make sure raw meats do not come in contact with other foods on the buffet. Never place cooked food back on the same plate that previously held raw food unless the plate has been first washed in hot, soapy water.

Always use a food thermometer to make sure meat and poultry are cooked to the right temperature. Color and texture are not indicators of doneness. Ground beef should be cooked to 160 degrees F, poultry should be cooked to 165 degrees F and steaks should reach a 145 degrees F, with a three-minute rest time.

Keep hot food hot and cold food cold. Bacteria multiply rapidly between 40 degrees F and 140 degrees F. Do not keep food on the buffet at room temperature for more than two hours. Hot foods need to have a heat source to keep them out of the danger zone, and cold foods need to be nestled in ice to remain safe for guests. When in doubt, throw it out. Replenish with fresh servings.

As USDA says, when it comes to food safety, there are no yellow cards, only red ones.

If you have any burning questions concerning food safety, USDA’s virtual representative, “Ask Karen,” is available at AskKaren.gov. Food safety experts are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT at the USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854).

Food Safety News

Keep Food Penalty-Free at Your World Cup Party

Whether you’re rooting for Argentina or Germany in the World Cup final on Sunday, make sure that your match-viewing is penalty-free by following the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s food safety advice. The agency has even made the eye-catching graphic below to help you out.

Unless you are the goal keeper, using your hands is not permitted in soccer. The same goes for food handling in order to keep everything safe. Before and after preparing or handling food, always wash hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds. Use clean platters to serve and restock food, and keep surfaces clean.

Avoid cross-contamination by keeping raw meats separate from other foods. Make sure raw meats do not come in contact with other foods on the buffet. Never place cooked food back on the same plate that previously held raw food unless the plate has been first washed in hot, soapy water.

Always use a food thermometer to make sure meat and poultry are cooked to the right temperature. Color and texture are not indicators of doneness. Ground beef should be cooked to 160 degrees F, poultry should be cooked to 165 degrees F and steaks should reach a 145 degrees F, with a three-minute rest time.

Keep hot food hot and cold food cold. Bacteria multiply rapidly between 40 degrees F and 140 degrees F. Do not keep food on the buffet at room temperature for more than two hours. Hot foods need to have a heat source to keep them out of the danger zone, and cold foods need to be nestled in ice to remain safe for guests. When in doubt, throw it out. Replenish with fresh servings.

As USDA says, when it comes to food safety, there are no yellow cards, only red ones.

If you have any burning questions concerning food safety, USDA’s virtual representative, “Ask Karen,” is available at AskKaren.gov. Food safety experts are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT at the USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854).

Food Safety News

“A lot less restaurant visits due to World Cup craze”

John van Laethem:
“A lot less restaurant visits due to World Cup craze”

At first glance, one wouldn’t think that the football World Cup would influence the fruit and veg or herb trade in any way. Yet companies, especially those that deliver to restaurants, do notice the difference. John van Laethem from Belgian company Van Laethem says that at the moment, sales are reasonably good. “The only thing bothering us at the moment is the World Cup craze, which translates to less visitors with the restaurateurs.”


According to John, a lot of managers in the restaurant trade are coping with fewer guests. “And of course we also notice that in sales. Last week in particular, we felt the impact of that strongly. A lot of our buyers tell us that customers do come in, but they just eat one dish and then they’re gone again. Most people want to watch the match at home, or on a big screen. The first part of the match is not that important, but nobody wants to miss the end. Some big screens, like at ‘t Zand in Bruges, attract 15,000 people. There, matches of the Belgian national team, as well as the final, are shown on a big screen. In addition, there are a lot more places where the World Cup is being watched by large groups. It’s likely that many of those people would normally be sitting in restaurants.”


Increasing consumption
The diverse product range of Van Laethem consists of culinary herbs, edible flowers, mini vegetables, sea vegetables and salads. “This season, we haven’t expanded our product range very much, but we do look forward to a growing market. With our products, we now also try to reach the consumer directly.” He does expect the restaurant sector to catch up within two weeks. “We had a difficult spring, but are doing a bit better now. All in all, consumption has increased slightly compared to last year.”  


For more information:
John van Laethem
Van Laethem Bvba
[email protected]
www.bellaroma.eu

Publication date: 7/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Tops, Winco push World Cup promotions

Who says Americans don’t care about soccer? Retailers across the country are betting on the World Cup with contests, events and other promotions.

Tops partnered with Coca-Cola to donate soccer balls to local schools.

WinCo customers have the chance to win official gear from the U.S. soccer team.

At Mi Pueblo, customers can fill out a World Cup bracket for a chance to win $ 2,500.

Northgate Gonzalez Markets has been holding in-store events with giveaways and games.

Earth Fare created a special savings offer tied to the U.S. team’s performance.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

More male bugs in a warmer world? Temperature influences gender of offspring in bugs

Whether an insect will have a male or female offspring depends on the weather, according to a study led by Joffrey Moiroux and Jacques Brodeur of the University of Montreal’s Department of Biological Sciences. The research involved experimenting with a species of oophagous parasitoid (Trichogramma euproctidis), an insect that lays its eggs inside a host insect that will be consumed by the future larvae. “We know that climate affects the reproductive behaviour of insects. But we never clearly demonstrated the effects of climate change on sex allocation in parasitoids,” Moiroux explained.

The study was carried out in collaboration with Guy Boivin of the Horticulture Research and Development Centre of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and published in the May issue of the journal Animal Behaviour.

Cold impairs gender selection

As in bees, wasps, and ants, the gender determination of Trichogramma parasitoids is called “haplodiploid,” that is, fertilized eggs produce female offspring, while unfertilized eggs produce male offspring, summarizes Moiroux. “It is possible to predict whether the parasitoid will lay a son or daughter by observing the presence or absence of a pause in its abdominal contractions at the time of spawning,” he says. “A pause means the egg will be fertilized. Conversely, the absence of a pause means the egg will not be fertilized.”

To know whether this particular behaviour is modified by climate, the researcher exposed female Trichogramma to three different temperatures: 34°C (high), 24°C (medium), and 14°C (low). The study found that when it was hot, females deliberately produced more males than at medium temperature — at 34°C, the number of males produced increased by 80%.

The ability of Trichogramma to “program” the sex of their offspring is compromised, however, when the temperature is cold. “There was a physiological stress that was not related to the females’ choice,” notes Moiroux. “They intended to spawn as many females as during medium temperature, but the eggs were not fertilized after all. There were therefore more males produced at low temperature.”

Increasing fitness

In insects, fitness is positively correlated with the size of an individual, and this relationship is greater in females than in males. “Larger females live longer and have higher fertility, whereas males are relatively less penalized than females when they are small,” Moiroux said. “It is therefore advantageous for mothers to have the largest female offspring possible and use hosts that will produce smaller offspring for males.”

However, in a hot environment, offspring are smaller. This is why females tend to use hosts found in hot areas to produce males and reserve hosts in colder areas (e.g., in the shade of hedges) to produce females.

Biocontrol

As part of this study, which was funded by the Ouranos Consortium, Moiroux tried to understand the possible role of global warming on the relationship between crop pests and their natural enemies — parasitoids and predators. Among the issues addressed, he sought to determine whether there is an effect of “phenological asynchrony” between parasitoids and their hosts, and therefore an impact on the availability of host eggs and on pest control by their natural enemies. “Predators and parasitoids are more sensitive to climate change, and this is why many researchers expect an increase in episodes of phenological asynchrony. This could be very harmful to crops if hosts escape the control of their natural enemies,” he said.

In Quebec, the European corn borer is a pest that farmers face every year. The parasitoid Trichogramma, for its part, is an ally since its larvae kill this insect host. “It is of the utmost importance to clearly identify harmful and beneficial insects in the field in order to adopt an appropriate strategy for integrated pest management,” Moiroux said. He will now be looking at which species of soybean pests could come to Quebec in the coming years due to climate change.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universite de Montreal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Moonlight joins Sun World stone fruit program

Sun World International LLC has named Moonlight Sales Corp., headquartered in Reedley, CA, as its newest licensee, enabling the Moonlight family of companies to access and expand Sun World’s renowned peach, plum, nectarine and apricot varieties along with marketing its premiere brands.

Moonlight is an industry-leading farming company specializing in product branding and retail merchandising strategies. It is owned by brothers Russ and Ty Tavlan, who also manage the company’s growing, packing, marketing and distribution of product grown on its farm holdings.

Moonlight’s primary focus is on high-input, capital-intensive peaches, plums, nectarines and apricots in the summer, along with oranges, lemons, mandarins and pomegranates.

The appointment follows recent decisions by Sun World to bolster its stone fruit breeding program and to expand its California presence by licensing its proprietary plum, peach, nectarine and apricot varieties to selected California grower marketers. Moonlight joins three other California licensees and 22 companies worldwide that comprise Sun World’s stone fruit licensing network.

In addition to distributing stone fruit from new varieties developed by Sun World, Moonlight has been awarded a license to use Sun World’s brands, including Black Diamond, Honeycot, Super Star and Black Giant, in the marketplace, according to David Marguleas, executive vice president at Sun World.

“Sun World is excited about the opportunity to share its unique line of red and yellow fleshed plums, aromatic apricots and flavorful peaches and nectarines with Russ Tavlan and the Moonlight organization,” Marguleas said in a press release. “He brings vision and creativity as well as the commitment to quality and scale that retailers appreciate.”

Sun World’s fruit licensing program involves more than 1,000 producers and marketing companies in most of the world’s major fruit-growing regions.

In addition to creating new and better tasting peach, plum, nectarine and apricot varieties, Sun World’s new variety development program focuses on a full range of fresh grapes with extraordinary characteristics such as enhanced flavor, distinctive taste, larger berries and clusters, earlier and later ripening times and availability, and increased productivity.

Sun World, a longstanding U.S.-based producer and marketer of fresh fruit, operates one of the world’s largest table grape and stone fruit breeding programs. Since its inception in the mid 1970s, the company’s Variety Development Center has released countless varieties with improved flavor, size, color, shelf life and extended seasonality. In addition to production on its own California properties, Sun World and/or its licensees grow these proprietary varieties in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Europe, South America, Israel and South Africa.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.