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Hail damage to New Zealand kiwi production limited

According to Oliver Broad, Communications Manager for Zespri
Hail damage to New Zealand kiwi production limited

During early November, three kiwifruit-growing regions in New Zealand were struck by hail, Although it was feared that the hail may have adversely affected the kiwifruit growing season, the damage to the country’s largest horticultural export should be limited, according to Oliver Broad of Zespri.

“We expect the loss to be less than 1%,  so not a significant loss of the total crop. According to many growers, hail at this time of year is unusual, so it did come as a surprise. For green kiwifruit in particular we are pre-fruit set, so we don’t have fruit on the vine yet, so where there has been an impact it is due to buds being knocked off, or damage to the leaf cover.

“The two main regions affected were Nelson and the Bay of Plenty, in the Tauranga and Welcome Bay areas. We’ve had notifications from growers that 110 orchards were affected by the hail damage. Whilst this can be significant for the individuals, we don’t expect significant impact on a national scale. The hail insurance scheme we have for Zespri has however kicked into place for our growers and we are working through that now.

“The rest of the season so far has been good, and we are looking forward to a December estimate, which will give us a more accurate forecast of production volumes. In the large scheme of things, as a company, we are expecting to increase our production this year, and to continue to do so with significant volumes over the next few years, especially with Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit.

“The total supply from Zespri during 2014 was over 90 million trays of kiwifruit, and the outlook for this season is to the tune of 100 million trays, with strong increases in volume over the coming years.

The main driver of our volume growth is the increase in supply of gold kiwifruit, which will reach around 30 million trays in 2015 and over 50 million trays by 2018.”

For more information:
Oliver Broad
Zespri International Limited
Tel: +64 27 509 1839
[email protected]
www.zespri.com

Publication date: 11/18/2014
Author: Katja Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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More Than 100 People Sickened by Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in New Zealand

More than 100 people across New Zealand are sick from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and at least 35 people have been hospitalized.

Most cases have been in the Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington areas.

Outbreaks of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, which are not common, have previously been associated with the consumption of contaminated food, especially raw or undercooked pork products, and sometimes fresh produce.

Toi Te Ora — the public health unit for the Bay of Plenty and Lakes District Health Boards — suspects that pre-packaged carrots and lettuce are to blame, but health officials have not yet confirmed the source of the outbreak.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infection with Y. enterocolitica occurs most often in young children. Common symptoms in children are fever, abdominal pain and diarrhea, which is often bloody. Symptoms typically develop four to seven days after exposure and may last one to three weeks or longer.

In older children and adults, right-side abdominal pain and fever may be the main symptoms and may be confused with appendicitis. In a small proportion of cases, complications such as skin rash, joint pains, or spread of bacteria to the bloodstream can occur.

Health officials are reminding people to take extra care with personal hygiene when preparing and consuming food and to thoroughly wash any raw fruits and vegetables before eating them.

Food Safety News

New Zealand kiwi season starts in Europe

New Zealand kiwi season starts in Europe

New Zealand’s kiwifruit season has officially started, as marked by the arrival to Europe of the first reefer ship loaded with the fruit. Approximately 120,000 tonnes of kiwis will enter Europe this season via the port of Zeebrugge. The novelty this year will be the large volumes of Sungold kiwifruit; a sweeter variation of the traditional Zespri Green kiwifruit. As of today, the first New Zealand kiwis are on the shelves.

Exactly thirty years ago, the first reefer ship from New Zealand arrived at Zeebrugge. Ever since, the port of Zeebrugge has become the European hub for Zespri kiwifruit.

From the warehouse at the Kiwiweg in Zeebrugge, the first of thousands of tonnes of kiwifruit will be shipped in the coming days to countries in North, Central and Western Europe. “Our terminal in Zeebrugge has some unique features, such as a central location in Europe, excellent accessibility and a reliable quality control system. This year, between May and October, over twenty reefer ships will be mooring at Zeebrugge, which is the equivalent of about 120,000 tonnes of kiwifruit,” says Bert Barmans, CEO of Zespri Europe.


New sweet version 

Zespri has kicked off the season with a new, 100% natural, kiwi variety: the Zespri Sungold; a sweeter version of the well-known green kiwi, which will become widely available this year in Belgium. New Zealand’s harvest of Zespri Green and Gold, as well of the new Sungold, are all already on the shelves.


Publication date: 5/26/2014


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“Smooth sales for New Zealand onions”

Gerard Hoekman, Mulder Onions:
“Smooth sales for New Zealand onions”

New Zealand onions are selling well. So says Gerard Hoekman from Mulder Onions in Kerkrade. However statistics show that volumes have never been this big in the run up to week 18 and there are few supplies on the market. “The big difference to the same period last year, is that everything is being sold quickly,” said the importer.


 
He explains that the good sales are partly due to the Dutch onion becoming more expensive, while quality, in many cases, left a lot to be desired. “I expect that the German market will also swap over to New Zealand onions. We have also sold them to Sweden which is unusual for the time of year.” 


 
There is not a lot of competition from other imported onions. “There are some Tasmanian onions but not enough to keep up with demand. Chile have also only produced a few onions and there is nothing from Argentina. They make more money locally and that is a more attractive proposition rather than risking the quality issues when sent over from Europe. South African onions are still exported to Spain but it is actually too late for that. It should have started in March and only for a brief period,” concluded Gerard. 

Publication date: 4/15/2014
Author: Caroline de Rooij
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Enzafruit starts New Zealand apple season

first container of Cox Orange Pippin in Antwerp port around April 11
Enzafruit starts New Zealand apple season

Enzafruit is opening the New Zealand apple season this week with the new harvest of Cox O.P. The first containers are on their way and are expected in the port of Antwerp around April 11 2014. The Cox Orange Pippin has become a popular dessert apple over the course of the years. “This is because of it’s crunchy flesh and aromatic taste.”

 

Enzafruit can also export the first Doyenné du Comice pears with the arrivals of Cox Orange Pippin. “The weather gods were good to the New Zealand growers this year: enough sun during the day and cool nights produced optimal colour, delicious taste and good calibres.”

For more information:
Enzafruit New Zealand Continent
Tongersesteenweg 135
B – 3800 St- Truiden                                                         
BTW BE 425 134 568
www.enzafruit.be
www.jazzapple.eu  
[email protected]                                     
 

Publication date: 4/9/2014


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Enzafruit starts New Zealand apple season

first container of Cox Orange Pippin in Antwerp port around April 11
Enzafruit starts New Zealand apple season

Enzafruit is opening the New Zealand apple season this week with the new harvest of Cox O.P. The first containers are on their way and are expected in the port of Antwerp around April 11 2014. The Cox Orange Pippin has become a popular dessert apple over the course of the years. “This is because of it’s crunchy flesh and aromatic taste.”

 

Enzafruit can also export the first Doyenné du Comice pears with the arrivals of Cox Orange Pippin. “The weather gods were good to the New Zealand growers this year: enough sun during the day and cool nights produced optimal colour, delicious taste and good calibres.”

For more information:
Enzafruit New Zealand Continent
Tongersesteenweg 135
B – 3800 St- Truiden                                                         
BTW BE 425 134 568
www.enzafruit.be
www.jazzapple.eu  
[email protected]                                     
 

Publication date: 4/9/2014


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Asian markets looking very good for New Zealand apples

Asian markets looking very good for New Zealand apples

The New Zealand apple season is well under way and general volumes are expected to be slightly down on last year. Richard Hill from Mr Apple says there are less apples on the trees this year, but the fruit size is bigger and there are enough new trees coming into production to just about make up the difference.

“It is a great season for Brix levels and the apples have great pressure. The levels of dry matter are the best I’ve seen in years, this relates to great flavour and texture and in turn quality,” explains Hill.

It has been a very mild winter in New Zealand and according to Hill there was no single occasion where they had to carry out frost protection, compared to 26 times the year before. “This has led to a very early season, 1 week earlier than last year, there is less russet and great sugar levels.”

As one of New Zealand’s largest exporters, Mr Apple have a large range of varieties. The Royal Gala types are already being harvested as well as NZ Queen, Jazz and Fuji which are just starting.

Mr Apple is also growing a new variety Opal, last year was the first year when some commercial volumes were available. “This is a very interesting variety, good to eat and great from a consumer point of view,” says Hill. “But we must be sure we can manage it from a grower’s perspective. We need to look at quality, yield, russeting and also cost structure. It needs to be viable and have good market potential.”

The export market is better than had been anticipated, New Zealand apples no longer pay a tariff going into Taiwan, making that a very attractive market. Hill explains that Europe has become less popular among New Zealand exporters due to bad exchange rates in recent years. On the other hand Asian markets are looking very attractive, there are many growing economies in Asia, and they take all sizes of fruit.

Mr Apple are changing their varietal mixes to suit the Asian pallet.

Publication date: 3/21/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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First arrival of New Zealand onions for Van der Lans International

“Higher priced Dutch onion makes change to import easier”
First arrival of New Zealand onions for Van der Lans International

The imported onion season has begun again at Van der Lans International. The first containers from New Zealand have arrived at onion sorting and packing station Jonika in Oostdijk, to be followed by the first red New Zealand onion, yellow Tasmanian and white onions from India and mainland Australian route. In addition the importer supplies Baarn still Grano type onions from Chile. 

Export figures show that there are fewer New Zealand onions coming to Europe over the past year up until now. “Last year New Zealand had a poor season. There were too many exported which resulted in bad prices at the end of the season,” said Jan van der Lans. “People are now looking for alternative markets. The Indonesian market and New Zealand market are offering the same sizes as Europe. The focus is to find the New Zealand exporters alternative markets.”

According to Jan the outlook is positive for these first onions. “Weather conditions were good and I hear the quality should also be good. The onions arriving these first three weeks are already sold, but those amounts are limited. By mid April the onion import will really be busy.” Main buyers for these New Zealand onions are retailers in Benelux, France, Germany and Austria. The UK are traditionally served directly by New Zealand. 

Van der Lans says that the market situation of Dutch onions has only limited impact on the market of New Zealand onions. “The price of Dutch onions is a lot higher than last year which makes the switch to imported onions easier, but the import price is always considerably higher. Imported onion are not sold because of price, but because retailers like to offer a new harvest.”

For more information:
Van der Lans International B.V.
Jan van der Lans
Gerrit van der Veenlaan 18
3743 DN Baarn
Tel: +3135 6422622
Fax: +3135 6422644
www.vanderlans.com

Publication date: 2/27/2014


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New Zealand Company Recalls Cream for E. Coli Contamination

The New Zealand company Fonterra is recalling 8,700 of bottles of cream distributed in-country for E. coli contamination.

The recalled products include 300ml and 500ml bottles of Anchor and Pams fresh cream with a best before date of Jan. 21. The products were distributed to retail and foodservice outlets on New Zealand’s North Island.

“We are sorry for the inconvenience and concern this recall might cause but food safety and quality are our top priorities,” Fonterra Brands NZ Managing Director Peter McClure said in a statement.

Consumers are advised not to consume this product and should return it to the place of purchase for a refund.

This recall comes five months after Fonterra, the world’s largest dairy processor, said its whey protein concentrate used in baby formula was found to be contaminated with potentially deadly botulism and Sri Lankan health authorities said they found a toxic agricultural chemical in two batches of milk powder.

Food Safety News

New Zealand Fruit Tree Company has significant national variety share

New Zealand Fruit Tree Company has significant national variety share

With 17 years under its belt, the New Zealand Fruit Tree Company (NZFTC), operating out of Hawkes Bay and Central Otago, is the nation’s largest private importer of commercial fruit varieties. According to John Morton, NZFTC company executive officer, it now represents many of the major breeding programs both within New Zealand and overseas. NCFTC is responsible for the administration, introduction, development and commercialization of the varieties it represents.

Operating its own level-two quarantine facility and research orchards, the NZFTC can efficiently and quickly establish the development of new varieties, maintaining control and security throughout the process. “As the nation’s horticultural industry develops and becomes more sophisticated, the NZFTC has forged strategic partnerships with leading nurserymen and marketing organizations,” Morton says. “These strategic partnerships allow the company to develop market strategies for new variety releases and the flexibility to operate a tree or production-based royalty system. The company is now operating several managed programs.”

The companies that John Morton Limited currently represents include New Zealand Fruit Tree Company and Shennong Variety Management Limited (SVM). SVM develops new concepts and appreciation of intellectual property in China.

Morton has also been appointed as global manager of the Papple® pear brand, an exciting new pear variety launched in 2011. The Papple has gained international recognition as a new brand of pear – www.papplepear.com

In 2000 New Zealand Fruit Tree Company was accepted as a member of the Associated International Group of Nurseries (AIGN®). Morton is now an AIGN® director.
   
For more information:
Cristy Warnock
Brands Fruit Trees
Tel: +64 509-307-1947
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 10/11/2013


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